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REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 

FOR THE MUNICIPAL TEAR 1880, 



Commencing Monday, January 5th, 1880, and ending Monday, 

January 3d, 1881. 



BE ING RE P RINTS 0F REp0RTS A8 p(JBLISHED By coNTRicT ^ me __ BogToN 

EVENING TRANSCRIPT." 



Second Series Volume 1. 



m 



X^ CONDITAA.D. CW 



BOSTOI: 

PRESS OF ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS 

(KEPRINTS OF REPORTS FROM THE TRANSCRIPT PRESS.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Board of Aldermen, October 11, 1880. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Printing be requested to have the index of 
the volume of "Proceedings" for the current year prepared on the system adopted 
by the Clerk of Committees for the general index of all the preceding volumes. 

Passed in Common Council. Came up for concurrence. 

Read and concurred. 

Approved by the Mayor, October 12, 1880. 



In accordance with the above order of the City Council, and a vote of the 
Committee on Printing, the following index for 1880 has been prepared under 
supervision of the Superintendent of Printing. The present volume is issued as the 
first of a new series, a consolidated index of the twelve previous volumes being 
now in preparation by the Clerk of Committees. 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL, 



FOR THE MUNICIPAL YEAR 1880. 



[Preceding the figures indicating page, a signifies Aldermen, c Common Council.'] 



A street — 

Telegraph posts a 29 
"Wooden building : petition c 694, a 700 
Abbott street — 

Petition to put in order a 59 
Abbott, Charles A. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Abbott, L. B. et al.— 

Clarence st. (ward 20) , edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 443 
Albany st. (ward 20), crossing, petition a 443; report 467 
Abbott, L. B.— 

15 Clarence St., sidewalk, petition a 499 
Abbott, \V. E. etal.— 

Blue Hill av., petition a 43 
Abbott, William F.— 

Coaches from Neponset av. to Upham's Corner, transfer of 
license a 519 
Accounts — 

Joint standing committee a 2, c 4, 10 

Examination by expert c 532, a 533 ; pay a 586, c 601 

Auditor of Accounts — 

Alfred T. Turner nominated and elected a 280, c 292 
Monthly Exhibits, Jan., 5; Feb., 72; March, 125; April, 
206; May, c 274; June, a 330; July, c 396; Aug., 
a 427; Sept., a 457; Oct., c 503; Nov., a 554; Dec, c 635. 
Authorized to make closing transfers a 111, c 121. 
Estimates for 1880-81 c 117, a 125, c 162, 182, a 189, c 200 
Detailed estimates of annual appropriations c 138, a 139, 

216, 243, c 249, 272 
Annual report a 246, e 249, 272, 374 
Leases owned by the city a 265 

Verification of payment of interest and bonds — see Treas- 
ury department. 
Information relating to Back Bay improvements — see 
Parks. 
Adams street — 

Middlesex Railroad Co., tracks a 43, 93, 198 
Adams street (ward 20) — 

Opening into Orchard park a 77, c 86, a 212, c 220 
Adams street (ward 24) — 

Relocation between Ashmont and Minot sts., damages a 94, 124, 

197.352 
Relocation between King and Ashmont sts., damages a 97, 112, 

124,197 ' 

Watering : between Fields Corner and Bowdoin st. a 213 
Wooden building : removal from Dorchester av., petition 

a 241 ; permit 483 
Sewer: hearing a 276; between Park and Lincoln sts., order 

passed a 282 
Paving, macadamizing, from Pierce av. to Minot st. also 

edgestones and gutters, order passed a 317 
Track: Metropolitan R. Co., extension through Bowdoin st. to 
Geneva av., report and order of notice a 350 ; hearing 400; 
permit 417 
Stable : corner Ashmont St., petition a 365; permit 388 
Telegraph poles: petition a 383; between Dorchester av. and 

Neponset av., permit a 589 
Crosswalk : corner Park st., petition a 533 ; report 574 
Edgestones : abatement and assessment a 666 
Adams, Ebenezer — ■ 

Nominated and elected director of E. B. ferries a 29, c 31, 55, 
147, a 15G ' ' 

Adams, Francis M. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Adams, George L., trustee — 

Blue Hill av., edgestones, assessment a 618 



Adams, George Z. — 

Geneva av. near Warren st., edgestones, etc., petition a 443 
Geneva av. extension, $1900 damages a 534 
Adams, Isaac — 

South st. widening, $8200 damages a 446 
A'dams, J. E. & Co. — 

Wharf corner Albany and Swett sts., lease a 94, c 99, 106 
Adams, Mary M. — 

Cazenove place, edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 518 ; order 
passed 546 
Adams, Mary M.— 

Columbus av., sidewalks, petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
Adams, O. F. et al. — 

Myrtle St. (ward 23) , sewer, petition a 124 
Adams, Samuel — see Statues. 
Ahem, John — 

Movement of wooden buildings from Union av. to Washington 
st. (ward 23), petition a 443 ; permit 458 
Ahern, John J. — 

Movement of wooden buildings: from 912 E. Second st. to rear 
of 582 E. Third st. (ward 14) ; from P St., near E. Second 
st., to 582 E. Third st. ; petition a 209 ; permit a 217 
Ahern, Timothy- 
Movement of wooden buildings: from Hampshire st. to Vernon 
St., permit a 145; from Plympton St., near Albany St., to 
street near Harrison av., petition a 209; permit a 248; 
from Howard st. (ward 20) across street, permit a 248 ; 
across Dudley st., permit a 447 
Alaska street- 
Erection of bank wall, petition to occupy sidewalk a 209; per- 
mit a 217 ; also six feet of roadway a 248 
Sidewalks : Nos. 27 and 29, petition a 276 ; order passed 317 
Albano street — 

Grading, gravelling, order passed a 430 
Albans street — 

Grading, etc. a 59 
Albany street — 

Portion of wharf let to J. E. Adams & Co. a 94, c 99, 106 

At Stearns' wharf, erection of wooden building, petition a 93, 

c 99 ; permit a 126, c 130 
Stables : petition a 109 ; permit a 159 ; petition a 425 ; permit 446 
No. 796, taxes remitted c 123, a 125, 159, c 160 
Claims : personal injuries a 189, c 200 
Removal of sidewalk, substitution of stone driveway, petition 

a 189; permit a 350 
Telegraph poles: a 209, 217, 468, 534, 535 ; at 390, removal, pe- 
tition a 568 
Sprinkling: between Eustis and Hampden sts., petition a 241 
Temporary occupation : petition of Boston Water Works a 25S ; 

permit a 281 
Reduction of rent of wharf property, petition a 297, c 307 
Steam engine: corner Dedham St., petition and order of notice 

a 327; hearing 365; permit 3S8 
Crossing : petition a 443 ; report 467 
Sidewalks : corner Dedham st., petition a 51S ; order passed 

574 
Driveway : No. 549, petition a 568 

Wooden' building: movement to No. 728, petition a 5S6 ; per 
mit 650 
Albemarle street — 

Grading a 47, c 49, 71 
Albion street — 

Sidewalk: petition a 213; order passed 24S ; petition a 456; 
order passed 467 
Albrecbt, Nicholas et al. — 

Washington st., crosswalk at Lotus place, petition a 209 



IV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Alden, Morton — 

Appointed : inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 ; meas- 
urer of wood and bark a 125 
Aldermen, board of — 

Organization 1 

Notice of organization of common council 2 

Regular meetings, Mondays, 4 P.M., assigned 2 

Contingent fund 2, a 663, c 6^0 

Special meetings 442, 456, 485, 663 

Conventions with school committee — see Schools. 

Death of Alderman George E. Bell a 231, c 232 

Method of filling vacancies a 404, c 405, a 630; referred to next 
board of aldermen a 701 

Annual dinner 690 

The final proceedings 701 
Aldrich, Albert M.— 

No. 4 Faneuil Hall market, transfer of lease of cellar, petition 
a 327 ; permit 367 
Aldrich, George A.— 

No. 4 Faneuil Hall market, transfer of lease of cellar, petition 
a 327 ; permit 367 
Alexander avenue — 

Crosswalk to Taylor av. a 189 
Alexander, Alexis et al. — 

Appointed undertaker a 174 
Alexander, Thomas — 

Release refused a 388 
Alford street — 

From Maiden bridge to Everett line, paving a 189 

Tracks: Middlesex R. Co., petition a 297 ; report and order of 
notice 367 ; hearing 400 ; permit 430 

Seawall between Maiden bridge and poorhouse estate, fence, 
plank walk, a 430 

Wooden building : petition c 565, a 568 
Alger street — 

Lamps : petition a 468 
Alleghany street — 

Edgestoues, sidewalks: No. 10, petition a518; order passed 546; 
No. 14, petition a 518; order passed 546 
Allendale Springs — 

Passenger wagons: from Monument sq. through Centre St., 
petition a 327 ; permit 352 
Allen, A. II.— 

560J Main St. (Charlcstown), lantern, petition a 124; permit 
"a 144 
Allen, George H. — 

Appointed superintendent of lamps a 59 
Allen, Isaac I). & Co. — 

21 Winter St., crosswalk, petition a 400 
Allen, John A. et al — 

East Eighth St., between Dorchester and Lowland sts., side- 
walks, petition a 189; order passed 388 
Allen, Loring & Co. — 

Damages by fire, petition a 116, c 120 ; leave to withdraw a 158, 
c 160 
Allen, Timothy — 

Movement of wooden building from Hampshire to Vernon sts., 
petition a 124 ; permit 145 
Allston street (Dorchester) — 

Sewer : order of notice a 415 : hearing 426 ; order passed 446 

Telephone pole : near Ceutie st., permit a 589 
Alpine street — 

Telegraph pole, a 15 
American Bell Telephone Co. — see Telephone wires 
American Rapid Telegraph Co. — see also Telephone wires 

Brazer's Building, State St., projection of lantern, petition 
a 258; permit 300 
American Screw Co. — 

Jeffries point, ward 2, stable, petition a 442 ; permit 446 
American Steam Gauge Co. — 

Chardon st., steam-pipe, permit a 516 
American Union Telegraph Co. — see Telephone wires 
Ames, Hiram — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155. c 161 

Falmouth st , (limestones, petition a 425 
Ames, .lames li., trustee, et al. — 

Corner Lincoln and Summer sts., telegraph pole, petition a 551 
Ames, S. & H. — 

Bills allowed a 588, c 601 
Amory, Elizabeth J. — 

Washington St., land taken for Broadway extension, petition 
a 4*0 ; leave to withdraw 515 
Amory, Thomas C. — 

Nominated and elected overseer of the poor a 144, c 147, 172 
Anawan avenue — 

Laying out, damages a 28 

Edgestoues : petition a 400 ; order passed 416 

Grading, gravelling: from Park st. to Providence railroad, order 
passed a I 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company — 

Faneuil Hall, petition for use of a 241 

250th anniversarj of settlement of Boston, escort, resolution of 
thanks, c 475. a 480 

Election da] : halt-holiday a 31S, c 319 
Anderson. Andrew — 

Release refused a 350 



Andrews, Richard F. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Anniversary of formation of state government — 

Communication from Mayor a 518. c 523 
Anniversary (250th) of Settlement of Boston— see Boston celebra- 
tions 
Angier, William Rotch, et al. — 

Washington st. (Dorchester), track of Metropolitan Railroad 

Co., remonstrance a 213 
Anthony, Benjamin — 

164 Haggles st. stable, petition a 586 ; permit 616 
Anthony, Benjamin F., councilman (ward 19) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on survey and inspection of buildings 
11 ; Stony brook 11 ; 250th anniversary 239 

Remarks : 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 354, 396, 398, 

407, 419 
Public parks 540 

Pay of laborers for thanksgiving 585 
Change in building laws 670 
Apoll mio, Caroline D. — 

Warren st. near Blue Hill av., relocation, $26.50 damages a 28 
Apollonio, Nicholas A. — 

Nominated and elected city registrar a 64, c 87 
Appleton, George C. it al. — 

Rockland av., edgestoues, petition a 456 
Appleton, Nathan — 

Petition that boats on public garden pond may be used on Sun- 
days e 396, a 400 
Appleton, W. C. — 

62 Clifford st., sidewalk, petition a 365 ; order passed 388 
Appleton, William S.— 

Appointed record commissioner a 125, c 131 
Appropriations — 

$118113 for school committee c 6, al3, 14, c 19, a 26, c 32, 

a 44 
$3000 for Austin farm buildings a 48, c 49. 172, a 174 
$5000 to board of health a 61, c 66, a 114, c 120, a 128, c 130, 

a 143, c 146 
$33000 for street commissioners a 97, c 106. a 111, c 121 
$12000 for Cochituate and $6000 for Mystic water works c 122, 

137, a 139, 143, c 146 
$3000 for bridges a 127, c 130, a 143, c 146 
$4000 for health department a 129, c 130, a 143, c 146 
$280000 for new main from Chestnut hill reservoir — see Water 
$400000 for Broadway extension — see Streets 
$17900 for Marcella-st. home c 172, a 174 
$1300 to Austin farm c 172, a 175 
$544. 78 to public buildings a 177, c 181, 201 
$1500 from printing to record commissioners c 250, a 258 
$2500 to printing a 514 
$27000 for school-houses a 519, c 523, 536 
81200 for school-houses a 666, 681, c 692 
$500 to advertising a 568, c 576, 601 

$1300 to contingent fund joint committees a 568, c 576, 601 
$3000 for 250th anniversary a 573, e 576, a 587, c 601 
$2000 to registration of voters a 587, c 601: $2500 additional 

a 682, c 692 
$5500 for South end branch library a 587, 591, c 601 
$30000 for Koxbury canal a 666, c 670, a 681, c 692 
Archer, B. II . — 

$333.33 for services as superintendent north draw Chelsea 
bridge a 587, c 601 
Architect, city — 

George A. Clough nominated and elected c 87 
Arlington street — 

Poles : petition a 327 : report and order of notice 367 ; hearing 

postponed 400, 426; leave to withdraw 457 
Corner Boy Is too St., petition a 518 
Armories — see Militia 
Arnold, Albert E. — 

Lowell St., personal injuries, petition a 327, c 337 
Arnold arboretum — see Parks 
assessors — see Taxes 
Athens street — 

sidewalk : No. 150, petition a 543 
Atkinson, Edward — 

Plan for protection of high buildings from fire c 123, a 125, 
c 153, a 246, c 249 
Atkinson, Elizabeth R. — 

Putnam aud Lexington sts., abatement of sidewalk assessment, 
petition a 109 ; report a 145 
Atkinson, Isaac C. et al.— 

Tremont pi. (ward 24), lamps, petition a 533 
Atkinson, Sarah C. — 

Tremont, corner Church ft., personal injuries, petition c 137, 
a 139 ; leave to withdraw c 295, a 297 
Atlantic avenue — 

Central wharf and wet dock corporation, use of sidewalk, peti- 
tion a 43 ; permit a 65 
Change of rail, petition of Boston truckmen a 139 
Steam engine: corner Oliver st., petition and order of notice 

a 143; hearing a 189; permit a 211 
Metropolitan Railroad Co., connection with track, petition 
a 155 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



w« k «ko° rn To?? ufch Market ■'■• Petition a 241 
w™V 5 aad 2o ' ' P etit 'on a 276 ; ordar passed 317 
Hoisting apparatus: at 537, petition k 297 
Land damages : petition a 649 

SpSS^ raph Co - sce TeIeph <™ **- 

Aubu^ Kt'(KuS)- ^k^'- ° pera - boU?e > P ?titio " - 568 
Tree : removal, petition a 109 

Auburn street- 
Sidewalk and sewer abatement a 77 98 
Extension; damages a 111 197 ' 
Sewer abatement a 335 ' 
Sidewalk abatement a 467 

Auditor of accounts— see Accounts 

Austin, Charles F., councilman (ward Ill- 
Oaths of office 1 ; 
Elected : Finance committee c 7 

P siVne a rqi9r mi Kr e -° n • enKineer ' s department c 11 (re- 
signed 312) ; public institutions 11 ; new bridge to Char « 
town 21 ; improved sewerage 312 ° Ulailes " 

Kemarks : 

Appropriation bill 185 
Death of Joseph Kenney 203 
Stony brook 272, 288 

Austin, Gove & Ion- V ° 1UmeS ° f ancient reCOrds 250 

Ansti,rwnC„^ B - ) ' PaViDg ' Petiti0na77 

Forest Hills St., near Washington st. (ward 23), wooden build 
Avery toStF**"* * 2 ° 9 ' C 22 ° ' P ermit ° 238, aT *' 

.Fire-escape connection of buildings a 43 127 
Avery'Sn- tUi0U a 5<J j "^ PaSSed 404 ' 

Fairfield St., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 480 ; order passed 
Avery, Charles E._ 

Avery P Ge°orge a A i .- PeCt0r and TCigber ° f bund,e ^ a 12 * 
Fairfield and Newbury sts, sidewalk, petition a 499 
246 Commonwealth ay, sidewalk, peti'tion a S^order passed 

Avon street (ward 23) — 
Lamps: petition a 518 

Avon place — 

A y e«-vif D : .l etiti0n a 5iS > Pe ™ ifc 558 

Burroughs st. ( ward 23), stable, petition a 543 ; order passed 574 



Baalen, Flora— 

b-SSSojSt - ■*"■ SM8 ' 75 < " D " 1e ™ ' 482 

Grading etc. a 26, 43 
Badges — 

Badlam^^iam H f i° mm0 " C ° U ' 1Cil 41 > 57 > 138 > 152, 220 

Appointed constable a 456 
Bail, h. K. — 

Seventh St., edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 349 ; order passed 

Bailey, Amasa W.— 

„ 7 ""ml peS 665 gine ' PeHti0n ' ° raer D ° tke a 607 i '-anng 

Oath.°o d f e offi; J J'l COUQCilman (Ward «- 

Appointed: committee on legisl.itive matter? r- n „„„„ 1 10 

Elected: president pro ifm. 319,418 
Remarks : ' 

Hulea and orders of common council 7, 24 53 

■lomt rules and orders 10 ' 

Street and health departments 16 

-\ew court-house 22, 41, 107, 274, 29 

City hospital 50, 105 '>,"■' 

Harbor defences 51 

Assessors' department 58, 71 

Keccss during elections 67 

Inirteenth joint rule 74 

Krfi ai '-T/ aud nav * monument 90 
rvotices of committee meetings 99 
Bridge to Charlestown 99, 181 '06 
Mode of electing assessors 137 " 
Second assistant assessors 154, 100, 207 
City officers opposing legislation 206 
Excavating machinery 224 

Trustees of city hospital 273 
Charlestown almshouse 286 



Stony brook 288 
Barrel wagons 339, 356 
Fourth of July music 347 

New^S^S^^eS& entS 354 ' 398 > «" 

Law department 381, 392 

Truants and absentees from school 406 411 

Keducing motions to writing 411 

250th anniversary 436, 438, 450 

Rewards for detection and conviction of incendiaries 437 

Obstructions in Commercial st. 462 salaries i6l 

Revision of the ordinances 462, 627 641 654 

nance e s C 4 63 CerniDg j ° iat StaDdiDg committee °* °rdi- 
Treasury department 542 

SS o°f vS^er^' 61 ' 8 562 ' 578 ' 62i 

Voters 566^ Pr ° TiSi0n f ° r g — ' m * eti ^ of legal 
Management of police department 566 
Enlargement of city hospital 584 
School committee 693 
Care of neglected children 693 
Bailey, L. A.— 

Bailed R y c *-_i. StabIe ' P ° tition a 480 i Permit 500 

Bail e^wXni etalT t0 barge > Petiti0n c 4 '6. a «0 

Lee tio n b a e 9lf D ChiIdS and Ke - ves sts - (ward 23), sewer peti 
wTaSSSSr"* 8 ' ° rder0f " 0ti -282; h r eaS 

Bailey street (ward 24)— 

Primary school-house • order nnsso,i t^ „„ u -, 

o a 243; taxes remitted c 312^ 314 P ChaSe S ' te C 238 > 

BainS 1 Joh P n1"«?l 276iPermita317 

Bainard! John'-° m Trem ° nt 4 ° Ward '*- Spriokli ^, Petition a 276 

Bainbrge'stee^ 

Bain^dge : str e e a et- aIe "- ^'^ * 533 i permit 547 

Edgestones, sidewalks : petition a 663 
Baker, E. J. et al.— 

Bak^Ed:ar ( fK d ^/^' PetUi0na43 

Bake^rtt OV. ( R^ 20) ' IampS ' PetUi0Q a 59 

Petition to put in order a 26 

Lamps : petition a 456 
Baleh, William etal.— 

Balduf m KatSerine- eWalk ' PetUi ° n a 189 > order P as «ed 404 

307-9 West Third St., sidewalks, petition a 425; order passed 

Baldwin, Annie N.— 

Person^ injuries: petition c 346; leave to withdraw a 500, 

Baldwin, Henry et al. (ward 25)— 

Edgewood st. (ward 21), sidewalk, petition a 77 ; order passed 
Ballard, J.— 

^SS^iSVSS^T damages ' petHion a 568 

Bamrick, John T .— 

Banc^Tteiir/IV- 6 '" 6611 N ° S " 61 aud 63 > ,at "P. Petition a 456 

Essex st. extension from South to Federal sts., $3688 damages 
Bangs, William A.— 

Kingston st. , injury a 93, c 99 
Barbour John N. et al., trustees- 

Barke" Hiram- Dth "- SideWalk > petitio » a 5« 

Parso,,s_st. (Brighton), removal of trees, petition a 155 ; permit 
Barker, II. & Co.— 

Barke 2 r^eet r (W'.R0- a,k ' PeWti ° n " 518 ! °'' dUr PaSS6d 546 

Movement of iron boiler a 159 
Barling, Henry A. etal., trustees- 

liow L d t'' sidewa ' ks - sr^drng, petition a 124 

a 540 ' edStiSt0U ^ sidewalk - abatement and assessment 
Barnard, John P. rt al — 

m T. L^T^Z R) ' eDC,0SUre > PeHt -. C 206 ; leave 
Barnes & Dunklee— 

HOt rep B or?48l iCk ' ^ P ° StS ' permit a 29; petition a 468; 



VI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Barnes, Celia F. — 

92 Uoreland st. (ward 21), stable, petition a 213 
Barnes, II. W.— 

316 Marlborough St., sidewalk, petition a230; order passed a 248 
Barnes, Israel N. — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Harney, M. ('. — 

34 Pen-in st., sidewalk, petition a 468 ; order passed 500 
Barnstable Savings Hank — 

Beacon St., estate of Charles Burdetta433; leave to withdraw 
a 605, c 670 
Barrett, Andrew — 

Cheny st. (Roxbury), grade damages, petition a 568 
Barton, K rank J. — 

Appointed weigher of coal and measurer of wood and bark a 83 
Barron, .lames etal. — 

Petition for the division of labor a ! 
Harry, David !•'.. councilman (ward 16) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on health c 11 ; police 348 
Remarks : 

Visit of committee on fire department to other cities 825 
Advertising wagons 382 
Barry, .lames .1. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124; resigned c 490, a 

499 
10 Terrace st., lamp, petition a 109 ; permit 144 
Barry, John tt al. — 

Havre st., between Brooks and Porter sts., sidewalk, petition 
a 456 
Barry, John — 

199 Havre st. sidewalk, petition a 518 ; order passed 574 
Barry, .John R. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Barry, Michael — 

Charles st., damages, petition a 276, c 283 
Appointed undertaker a 481 
Barry, Patrick — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Barry, Thomas — 

Washington st. crosswalk at Lotus place, petition a 139 
Barsrow, R. I..— 

Pleasant st. ward 24, stable, petition a 533 ; permit 517 
Bartlett street (ward 21)— 

Stable: petition a 241 j permit 402 
Bartlett, K. I,, et al.— 

lis Lincoln St., removal of telegraph poles, petition a 568 
Bartlett, George N. <t al. — 

Kliot and Burroughs sts. (.Jamaica Plain) crossings, petition a 
211 
Bartlett, II. M.— 

Pope st. in arly opposite Chaucer St., erection wooden building, 
petition c 536, a 513 
Bartlett, .1. B. L.— 

Dinted measurer of wood and bark a 125: public weigher 
139 
Bartlett, Louis P.— 

Jeffries st., stable, petition a 456 ; permit 467 
Bartlett, W. E.— 

l'olk-st. school-house, pay for work, petition a 59, c 66, a 97, 
c 106 
Bassett, Joseph R. — 

400 to 418 Tremont St., 79 to 87 Albion St., and on Castle, Paul 
and Albion sts., sidewalks, petition a 213 ; order passed a 
248 
Basto place — 

Stable : near Salem St., petition a 414 ; permit 429 
Batchelder, Betsey K.— 

Blue Hill av. near Canterbury and Harvard sts., relocation, 
damages a 515 
Batchelder, Henry L. — 

2!)'.''.) Washington st., sidewalk, order passed a 24S 
Columbia st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 513: leave to with- 
draw 690 
Batchelder Joseph — 

Blue Hill av. near Canterbury and Harvard sts., relocation, 
$330 damages a 515 
Bates, Annie H. — 

318 Marlborough St., sidewalk, petition a 230 ; order 
a 248 
Bates, George C. el al. — 

Dix st. (ward 24), grading, edgestones, etc., petition a 209; 
order passed 408 

Bates, Joseph N.— 

357 North st., personal injuries, petition c 73, a 77 
Bathing — 

Bathing in ponds within city limits c 274, a 277, c 397, a 400 
Battery ma re h street — 

Paring : between Milk ami Broad sts., petition a 400 
Baxter, Francis J. — 

Appointed constable a 4S1 
Baxter >treet — 

Edgestones, sidewalks: No. 78, petition a480; order passed BOO 
70, petition a 499 

No. S3, petition a 543 ; order passed 558 

Edgestones : No. 77, petition a 



Bayley, Benjamin I*', et al. — 

Walnut av. at Bainbridge St., crosswalk, petition a 383 
Bayley, William B.— 

Appointed surveyor of marble, soapstono and freestone a 125 
Bay State Iron Co. et al.— 

First st., paving, petition a 93 ; order passed 317 
Bay State Iron Works — 

First st., near I st. (ward 14), stablo, ! ,potition a 174; permit 
a 198 
Bay State wharf (334-74 Albany St.)— 

Wooden building : erection, petition a 468, c 475 ; permit c 626, 

Beach street — 

'ween Washington St., Harrison av., and Essex St., 

petition a 139 ; leave to withdraw 402 
Running empty ears, petition a 174 
Widening in l s 71, land damages, petition a 26 ; order passed 

197 
Land corner Harrison av., sale authorized a 85, 95, c 99 ; change 

in terms of sale, petition a 414, c 418 ; order passed a 472, 

c475 
Lamp-posts in front of United States Hotel a 258, 281 
Widening : land damages, petition a 276 ; order passed a 446 
Steam engine: rear 112, petition and order notice a 426; hearing 

443 ; permit 447 
Telegraph poles a 468,511, 586, 561 
Cellar: No. 154-168, report a 
Tracks: to Federal st., permit a 018 ; connection with Harrison 

av. tracks, permit a618 ; near Lincoln st. to Kneeland St., 

petition a 649 
Claims : personal injuries, petition a 629, c 635 

nth Boston U.K. Co., additional cars, order passed a 630 
Middlesex R.It. Co., additional ears, petition a 649 
Beach street (ward 4) — 

i : near Hertford st., petition a 297 ; permit 335; license 
einded and reissued 352 
Beach street (ward 24) — 

Watering: petition a 209; " portion," order passed a 248 
Stable: near Centre st., petition a 349; permit 867 

in street — 
Steam engine : near Arlington a v. , petition and order of notice 

a 349; hearing 400; permit 402 
Temporary closing: south of West St., permit a 367 
Beacon Oil Company — 

Chelsea St., enlargement of wooden building a 175, c 181, a 209, 

c 220, 288, a 243; license to manufacture petroleum a 280 
43 India St., license to store and sell petroleum a 280 
Beacon street — 

Metropolitan Railroad Co., tracks a 124 

Sprinkling: from Hereford St. to Biooklino av. a 199; from 

Brool Brookline line a 199 

Claims: injuries to horse, petition a 241, c 249; injury to car- 
riage, petition a 543, c 548; personal injuries, petition c671, 

a 676 
Macadamising: from West Chester park to Brighton av., order 

passed a 248 
Sidewalks: corner Hereford st., petition a 276; order passed 

317 
Telephone poles : petition a 327 ; report and order of notice 367 ; 

hearing postponed 400, 426; leave to withdraw 457 
Bridge : building authorized a 416 
Edgestones, gutters : between Hereford st. and West Chester 

park, order passed a 430 
Estate of Charles Burdett: surrender by Barnstable Savings- 

Bank a 433; leave to withdraw a 065, c 670 
Grade: near \\ r park, damages, petition a 480 

Stall ■■ ' iiion a 414 ; permit 429 

Rear No. 347, petition a 586; remonstrance 613; permit 

No. 340, petition a 618; permil 
No. 342, petition a 613; permit 649 
Beal Julia A. it al. — 

Bainbridge St., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 663 
Bean, B. F.— 

12 Langdon st., sidewalk, petition a 124 

23 and 25 Clarence st., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 124 ; 

report and order a 281 
22 and 24 L tugdon st., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 124 
Bean, Mary B.— 

10'J George st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 139 ; order passed 

Becker, Louisa — 

42 Lagrange place, lantern, petition a 518 
Bedford street — 

Crosswalk, a 189 

At Chauncy st., permit to close a 198 

Widening: damages, a 281, 429 

High and Latin school-house and land, sale authorized c 411, a 
415 
. K. 1'ierson — 

Refunding tax, leave to withdraw c 228 
Beeching, William — 

61-0;s B lac ketone st., steam-engine, petition and order of notice 
a 415 : hearing 420 ; permit 447 
Bell, George Edwin, alderman — 

Oaths of office! 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



VJ1 



Appointed : committee on state aid a 2 ; county accounts 12 ; 
licenses 12 ; markets 12 : assessors' department 12 ; East 
Boston ferries 12 ; harbor 12 ; health 12 ; overseers of poor 12 ; 
public instruction 12 ; surveyor's department 13 ; treatment 
of poor 13 ; auditor's estimates 125 ; celebration June 17th 
139 
Decease : resolutions and orders passed 231 
Bell, William G. & Co. etal.— 

Clinton St.. paving, petition 314 ; order passed 367 
Bellevue street — 

Trees : petition a 241, e 249 ; report and reference a 280 

Removal, petition a 499 ; leave to withdraw 558 
Edgestones : petition a 543 ; order passed 558 
Bellevue avenue (ward 23) — 

Stable : petition a 327 : permit 350 
Belmont street (Charlestown) — 

Claims : personal injuries, petition a 97, c 99 ; leave to with- 
draw a 546, c 548 
Bennett, Caleb — 

Deceased, payment of dues e 695, a 700 
Bennett, Joseph, et al. — 

Sprinkling certain streets in ward 25, petition a 213 
Bennington street — 

Movements of wooden buildings a 155, 174, 179, 232 
Benson street — 

Claims : injuries to team a 26, c 31 
Bent, Joel W.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Benton street — 

Petition to put in order a 155 
Bergen, Patrick — 

Commercial-st. widening, $7500 damages a 111 
Berkeley street — 

South Boston R. Co., 12 cars per hour a 217 
Bridge repairs a 403 

Claims : personal injuries, petition c 581, a 586 ; leave to with- 
draw c 695 , a 700 
Fire-alarm box located near Columbus av. a 700 
Berry, Jacob W. — 

Cambridge st. rear Everett st. (ward 25), wooden building, peti- 
tion a 586, c 601 
Berry, Parker H. et al. — 

Hfth st. corner N st. (S. B.), crossings, petition a 413 
Bertram, John — 

2t>7 West Broadway (ward 13), wooden building, petition a 297, 
c 307 ; permit a 350, c 354 
Berwick park — 

Edgestones : corner Columbus av., petition a 383 ; order passed 

404 
Sidewalk : petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
Besarick, J. II. — 

Rear Virginia av. (ward 21), stable, petition a 649 ; permit 664 
Bessom court — 

Lamps : petition a 613 
Bessom, W. H., administrator — 

Bessom court, lamps, petition a 613 
Beverly street — 

Claims : personal injuries c 32, a 43 
Telegraph posts a 85 
Bianchetti, D. et al. — 

Hyde Park av., sidewalks etc., petition a 93 
Bibber, F. F.— 

East Sixth and Q sts., grade, petition a 514 
Bicknell, Thomas \V. et al. — 

Harvard, School, Abbott and Wales sts., petition to put in 
order a 59 
Bigelow, Austin, councilman (ward 25) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on treasury department c 11 ; treatment 

of poor 11 
Remarks : 

Salaries of city officers 149 
Trustees of City Hospital 273 
Bathing 274 
Decoration Day 325 
Fourth of July music 347 
Accounts of late treasurer of Brighton 405 
Visit to .Mystic water works 424 
Public parks 508 
Binney, C. J. F. et al. — 

Francis st., plank walk from Tiemont st. to Brookline av., 
petition a 124 
Binney, Charles E. — 

Passage-way from Concord to Rutland sts., removal of tree, 
petition a 456 ; leave to withdraw 534 
Birch street (W. R.)— 

Grading, gravelling, order passed a 403 
Bishop, Robert— 

157 West Sixth st. (S. B.), edgestones, sidewalks, crossings, 

petition a 97 
115 and 117 West Sixth st., sidewalks, petition a 276 ; order 
passed 317 
Bispham, E. J., II. N. Glover & A. K. Teele, trustees of Liversidge 
Institute of Industry — 
River st. widening, $50 damages a 415 



Bispham, E. J. et al, trustees — 

River St., grade damages, petition a 456 
Births, marriages and deaths — 

City registrar's department — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Nicholas A. Apollonio nominated and elected city regis- 
trar a 64, c 87 

Topics in mayor's address referred c39, a 44 

Iron doors a 48. c 49 

Vital statistics a. 62 

Report of committee on city registrar's department a 112, 
129, c 130, 148 

Old records of births, deaths and marriages a 217, c 220 

Annual report c 487 
Blackmore, William B. — 

Park St., near Pelton st. (ward 23), erection of wooden building, 

petition a 465, c 475 ; permit c 526, a 533 
Blackstone street — 

Steam engine : Nos. 61-63, petition and order of notice a 415 ; 

hearing 426 ; permit 447 
Blackwood street — 

Grading a 47, c 49, 71 
Blair, John — 

98 West Canton St., personal injuries, petition c 694, a 700 
Blair, John S.— 

Movement of wooden building from 454 Harrison av., petition 

a 443 ; permit 456 
Blakemore, John E., councilman (ward 23) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on elections c 4 ; city registrar's depart- 
ment 11 ; public parks 11 
Remarks : 

Mode of electing assessors 137 

Fourth of July 324 

Public parks 506 

Death of councilman Perkins 633 
Blakemore, John E. — 

Blakemore St., laying out, $279 damages a 466 
Junction Brown av. and Florence St., widening, $208.46 dam- 
ages a 466 
BlakemOTe street — 

Grading : petition a 400 
Laying out : damages a 402, 466 
Blaney, D. II. et al.— 

Prescott sq., petition a 241, c 249 ; report a 265, c 268 
Maverick and Central sqs., watering, petition a 297, c 307 ; 

leave to withdraw a 388, c 390 
Ferry approaches: remonstrance and petition for hearing a 314 
Bleiler, F.— 

Petition that Heath pi. be graded a 13 
Blossom street — 

Lamps : No. 10, petition a 485 
Blossom, William A. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Blue hill avenue — 

Between Warien and Columbia sts., petition to put in order 

a 13 
From Wales st. to Walkhill st., petition to put in order a 43 
Relocation, damages a 46, 159, 165, 352, 500, 515, 520, 617 
Grading : from Columbia to Walkhill sts. etc. a 59 
Pay for land taken a 174, 197 
Plan of laud between Warren st., Blue Hill av., Seaver St., 

Walnut av., Townsend St., petition a 174, c 181 
Sprinkling : between Dudley and Woodbine sts., petition a 213 
Sprinkling : " portion," order passed a 248 
Crosswalks : at Maywood st., petition a 43 

At Schuyler St., report a 248 
Grading, edgestones, gutters, macadamizing, from Warren St. 

to Columbia St., 'order passed a 2S1 
Wooden building : movement from junction of Blue hill av. 

and Norfolk st. to Milton line, petition a 327; permit 350 
Wooden building : corner Central av., permit a 350, c 354 
Primary school-house: between Glen road and McLellan av., 

order passed c 423, a 426 
Stables : petition a 241 ; permit 281 

At 91, petition a 349 ; permit 367 

Near Oakland St., petition a 414 ; permit 429 
Plank-walk : between Wales and Harvard sts., petition a 433 
Lamps : petition a 13, 365 

Corner Norfolk st., petition 499 
Edgestones: between Warren and Columbia sts., petition to 
rescind order a 297 

No. 193, petition a 297 ; order passed 317 

No. 169, petition a 349 : order passed 367 

Estate of Gowaid, petition a 468: order passed 500 

No. 175, petition a 514 : order passed 521 

No. 171, petition a 514 ; order passed 521 

No. 173, petition a 514 ; order passed 521 

Petition a 568 

Abatement and assessment a 618 
Edgestones, sidewalks : corner Hayward St., petition a 518; 

order passed 546 
Sidewalks: corner.Mt. Seaver av., petition a 456: order passed 467 

No. 49, petition a 518 ; order passed 546 

No. 5i, petition a 518 ; order passed 546 



VIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



No. 55, petition a 518 : order passed 546 
No. 57, petition a 518 ; order passed ">46 
No. 51, petition a 51ti ; order passed 540 

Nos. 1 to 25, petition a ,". 
Telegraph poles : a 535, 589 

rs : between Quincy st. and Lawrence av., petition a 551 
Blue, William — 

To Preble st. (ward 15), stable, petition a 93; permit a 112 
Board of aldermen — see Aldermen 
Board of health— see Health 
Boardmao, Arthur P. — 

Uerrimac st. near Haymnrket sq , injuries, petition a 297, c 307 
Boardman, .Joseph L. — 

Merrimuc st, near Hay market sq., damages to wagon, petition a 
297, c 307 
Roardman, William P. — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Bodwcll street (ward 20)— 

Lamps : a 59 
Bolan, Harriet A. and Alexander Southworth — 

Petitions in favor of appointment as superintendent of Charles 
liver bridge c 39o, a 400 
Bolan, Henry A. — 

ted superintendent Charles river bridge a 458, c 460 
Salary to Sept. 'J a 514, c 523, 536 
Bolan, Joel R.— 

Elected superintendent Charles river bridge c 14S, a 156 
Deceased, pay to Joel O. Bolan c 382, 390, a 400 
Bolau, John ('. — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Charles river bridge a 3S8 
Roland, Charles, et <//., lamplighters — 

Restoration of pay, petition a 241 
Bolton street — 

Sidewalks : between K and Dorchester sts., order passed a 367 
Grade damages : atSlO, petitions n 413, 514, c 565, a 568; report 
referred at; 14; at 292,294, petition a 425; order passed 568; 
petition a 551 
Bolton, John W., heirs of — 

Commercial st., widening, S4100 damages a 97 
Bonds of city officers- 
Annual examination a 336, c 337, a 688, I 
Boos, Gabriel T . — 

197 Shawmut av., taxes remitted, estate forfeited a 112, c 120 
Border street — 

Wooden building: movement from 64 Saratoga St., petition 
8 327 ; permit 367 
No. 17, enlargement, petition a 365, c 370 
No. 12s, erection, petition a 465, c 415; report c 526, a 533 
Boston celebrations — 

Anniversary f 250th) of settlement of Boston — 

Topic iu Mayor's Address referred c 3 l J, a 44; committee a 

14, a 49, 220, 228 ; report <• 288 
Committee of arraiigi ments c 238, a 243 
.Mayor invited to cooperate with committee of arrangements 

c 288, a 243 
$26000 appropriated for celebration c 238, a 243 
Holiday to city employes c 243, a 42T 

hall and departments closed c 423, a 427 
$101X10 additional requested a 429, 433, c 436, 438, a 442, 

lll,c 450 
Ice-water on Boston common c 455 a 457 
Representation of tire department authorized a 457, c 460 
Closing of streets authorized a 457, 407 
Closing of Faneuil hall market authorized a 457 
Steam-motor in trade procession a 443, 457, 465 
Observation stand c 402, 477 
Evening concerts c 463 
Extra pay for laborers a 471 
Resolutions of thanks a 472, c 475, a 480 
Memorial volume a 473, c 475, a 4S0, c 487, 504, a 514 
Boston Society of Natural History, damages a 4: 9, c 502, 

526, a 583 
Resolutions of city of St. John a 545, c ">IS 
$3000 additional appropriation a 573, c 576, a 587, c 601 
rt/i of July — 

Order for celebration c 207, 223, a 243 ; committee a 243 
Additional appropriations c 324, a 329, e 347, a 353, c 355, 

864, a 
Mooring boats against sea-wall a 353, c 355 
Faneuii Hall open for inspection a 367 
Thanks to orator a 388, c 390 
•dli of June — 
bration c 123, 136, a 139 
Holiday C 824, a 82 
Time not allowed c 324 
Washington'! birth/lay — 

Onler to commemorate c 41, 57, a 59 
Holiday for city employes D 41, 74 
Boston & Albany Railroad Co. — 

Devon st. (ward 25) , erection of wooden building, petition c 57, 
a 69; permit a 94, c 99, 106; stable, petition a 93; permit a 
112 
Grand Junction wharf, erection of wooden building, petition a 

124, c 130; permit c 173, a 175; petition c 373, a 383 
Albany st. between Kmcland and llai vard sts., sidewalk, stone 
driveway, petition a 1S9; permit a 35u 



Kneeland st., grading, remonstrance a 349; permit to close 

Sept. 17 a W7 
Cellar of passenger station, petition a 414; permit to construct 

below grade 429 
Marginal st., sidewalk, petition a 514; order passed 574 
l high St., iron pipe, petition a 607 ; permit 650 
Boston and Brookline Railroad Co Associates — 

Application for route, order of notice a 448; hearing 465; re- 
ferred 465; leave to withdraw 516; notice of hearing, etc., 
before railroad commissioners 518; City Solicitor instructed 
to appear 534 
Boston and Dorchester Railroad Co. Associates — 

Application for route, order of notice a 448 ; hearing 465 ; re- 
tell cd 465; leave to withdraw 516 ; notice of hearing, etc. 
before railroad commissioners 518; city solicitor instructed 
to appear 534 
Boston and Lowell Railroad Co. et al. — 

Minot St., petition that name be not changed c 694, a 700 
Boston and Maine Railroad Co. — 

Travers street, permit, to close Sept. 17 a 467 
Boston & Providence Railroad Co. — 

Columbus ave., crosswalk, petition a 213; order passed a 248 
Boston Button Co. — 

Steam engine, corner Atlantic av. and Oliver st., petition and 
order notice a 1 13 ; bearing alS9 ; permit a 211 
Boston Cold Storage and Freezing Co. — 

24 Eastern av., " run " across sidewalk, permit a 691 
Boston Catholic Cemetery Association — 

Signs at corners of Streets in West Roxbury, petition a 413; 
permit 500 
Boston live Cents Savings Bank — 

Colby place, lamp, petition a 480 
Boston Gaslight Co. — 

Commercial st. widening £49500 damages a 388 
Boston Hotels Condi Co. it ul. — 
Lanterns on coaches a 468 

Boston Machine Company — 

60 First St., erection of wooden building, petition a 139, c 146 ; 
permit c 173. a 175 
Boston Memorial Society — 

Proposal to provide two drinking fountains a 413, c 418 
Boston Produce Exchange — 

Lease of rooms approved a 514 
Boston, Revere Leach and Lynn Railroad Co. — 

inal st., wooden building, petition c 188, a 189 ; permit 
o288,a 248 
Marginal St. near Jeffries st. (ward 2), wooden building, peti- 
tion a 849, c 354; permit c 379, a 383. 
Saratoga st (E. B.), culvert, petition a 454 ; report 471 
Boston street — 

from Washington street to L'pham's comer, macadamizing a 43 
From Washington village to Cpbam's corner, macadamizing 

a 43 ; petition to put in order a 155 
Petition to put in order a 43 

Sprinkling : from Swett st. to Mt. Vernon st. a 199 
Watering : petition a 230 
Edgestones : petition a 499 ; order passed 521 
Boston Sugar Refinery — 

Webster and Marginal sts., pipes to sugar house, petition 
a 241 
Track : across Sumner st., petition a 629 ; permit 650 
Boston truckmen. — 

Atlantic av., change of rail, petition a 139 
Boston Turnverein — 

250th anniversary of settlement of Boston, resolution of thanks 
a 473, c 475 
Boston Water Power Co. — 

Restrictions and reservations on land, petition a 241, c 249; 

leave to with draw a 499, c 502 
Beacon entrance to Back Bay park— see Parks 
Exchange of land on Parker st. a 365, c 370, a 417, c 419, a 484, 

e 4s7 
Notice respecting parcel of Back Bay land, southeasterly side of 
Huntington av., between West Newton st. and Boston and 
Albany Railroad, c 421, a 426; order referred a 471, c 475; 
report, order passed, c 490, 504, a 514 
Boston Water Works — 

Albany st., temporary occupation, Stoughton St., neir Harrison 
av'., temporary closure, petition a 258; permit a 261 
Boston Young Men's Christian Union, etal.— 

larnswortli st., grading, etc., petition a 276 
Bosworth 8c Hamlin — 

256 Federal st. (ward 12), stable, petition a 213 
Bow street (Charlestown) — 

Raving: petition a 443 
Bowditeh, Azell— 

645 Warren st. (ward 21). stable, petition a 109; permit a 128 
Bowditeh, J. I. etal.— 

Pond st., macadamising, petition a 109; order passed 40d 
Bowditeh. William I. et a/., trustees— 

Francis-st. sewer, $200 damages a 402 
Bowdlear. William II.— 

20 and 22 Clifford St., sidewalks, petition a 413; order passed 
447 
Bowdoin avenue — 

Petition to put in order a 59 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



IX 



Bowdoin square- 
Barges, etc. — see Omnibuses 
Bowdoin square (ward 24) — 

Lamps : petition a 518 
Bowdoin street (ward 24)— 
Stable : petition a 124 

Near Union av., petition a 29V; permit 317 
Track: Metropolitan R. Co., extension from Adams st. to 
Geneva av., report and order of notice a 350; hearing 400; 
permit 416 
Bowe, James E. — 

G st., nuisance, petition a 400, c 405; leave to withdraw a 547, 

c548 
G st., damages, petition a 568 

C St., between Eighth and Ninth sts., edgestones, petition a 568 
Bowker, Horace L. — 

Appointed inspector of vinegar a 241 
Bowker. John E., councilman (ward 16) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on fire dept. c 11; public buildings 11 
Seat contested c 6, 32 
Remarks : fire alarms 419 
Bowker street — 

Alteration of sidewalk a 77 
Bowman, Sylvester — 

847 Albany St., stable, petition a 109; permit a 159 
Boyden, .Jason II. — 

Appointed measurer of leather a 109; upper leather 209 
Boyle Henry L>. — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Congress-st. bridge a 388 
Boylston avenue (ward 23) — 

Poles: petitiou a 314; permit 389 
Boylston National Bank — 

Corner Gloucester and Newbury sts., edgestones, sidewalks, 
petition a 533 ; order passed 558 
Boylston street — 

Public Library site : corner Dartmouth st. a 63, c 66, a 276, 

c 283, a 402, 414, 431, c 436 
Poles : near corner Arlington St., petition a 518; permit 534 
Lamp-posts: Hotel Brunswick, permit a 29; petition a 468; 

permit 483 
Sidewalk : petition a 518 

Triangular lot : petition to lay out as public square a 518, c 523 
Tracks: Metropolitan R. R. Co., permit a 618 
Boylston street (ward 23) — 

Petition to put in order a 43 
Poles : petition a 314 ; permit 389 
Brackett, Samuel — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Brackett, Samuel E. — 

South st., $S(J00 damages a 300 
Bradford, George — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Warren bridge a 388 
Bradlee, N. J. et al.— 

Highland St., sprinkling, petition a 213 
Bradley Fertilizer Company — 

East Swett st., wooden building, petition a 43, c 49 ; permit 
c 106, a 110 
Bradley, Ira — 

East Dedham st., reduction in price of land, petition a 468, 
c 475 ; leave to withdraw a 499, o 502 
Bradley Richards, trustee — 

Avery street, connection of buildings by foot-bridge or fire- 
escape, petition a 43 ; report inexpedient a 127 
Bradley, William H. — 

Nominated and elected superintendent of sewers a 64, o 87 
Bragg, Mary E.~ 

58 ClitTord st., sidewalk, petition a 383 ; order passed 404 
Braman, Joseph 15. et al. 

Market St., crosswalk, petition a 124 
Braman, Jarvis D. et al. — 

Parker St., petition to put in order and change name a 349 
Braner, Adolph, et al. — 

Petition that Baker st. (W. R.) be put in proper condition for 
public travel a 26 
Brattle street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 174, c 181 
Lamp : corner Brattle sq., petition a 400, 425 ; permit 467 
Brattle square — 

Paving: petition a 349 : order passed 367 
Bray, J. E. — 

Rutherford av., driveway into estate, petition a 297 
Breck, Charles Henry Bass, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on Faneuil Hall and county buildings 
12 ; resigned 30 ; lamps 12 ; licenses 12 ; assessors' depart- 
ment 12 ; claims 12 ; common 12 ; ordinances 12 ; public 
parks 13 ; inspection of prisons 15 ; new court house 15 ; 
250th anniversary 243 ; fourth of July 243 ; state election 
returns 545 ; regulation telegraph and telephone wires 556 
Elected : director of East Boston ferries a 29, c 31, 55 
Remarks : 

Portrait of Rear Admiral Winslow 95 
City hospital 111 

Burrill claim 115, 144, 212, 300, 335, 367 
South Boston park 139 



Second assistant assessors 175 
Appropriation bill 195 
Church square 244 
Vandalism on public garden 258 
New court house 262 

West Roxbury and South Boston parks 267, 533 
Channel for Stony brook 276 
Barrel wagons 315, 328, 446 
Centre-street sewer 333, 473 
Name for Back Bay park 335 
Telegraph and telephone wires 353, 431 
Personal explanation 353 
Inspector of vinegar 401 
Truants and absentees from school 401 
Plank walk on Longwood av. 545 
Free soup 613 

Repeal of ordinance relating to contracts 677 
Care of neglected children 687 
Bremen street — 

Lamps : petition 349 

Claims : damages to barge, petition c 476, a 480 
Brennan, .lohn, et al. — 

Church and Mt. Vernon sts. (ward 25), lamps, petition a 327 
Brennan, Thomas, et al. — 

Alger st., lamps, petition a 468 
Brett, Charles G. — 

Appointel public weigher a 314 
Brewer, Charles, et al. — 

Orchard St. ( W. R.), sewer, petition a 456 ; remonstrance 465 ; 
order notice 467 ; hearing 468 
Bridges — 

Standing committee a 12 
Supplies for repairs, contract authorized a 64 
$3000 additional appropriation, a 127, c 130, a 143, c 146 
Draw tender, petition for appointment a 443 
Liabilities of steam and street railroad corporations — see Legis- 
lative matters 
New bridge to Charlestown — 
Special committee c 21, a 26 
Report, order passed to petition a 65 ; reconsideration, laid 

on table 83 ; passed 96, c 99 
Memorial from Charlestown Trade and Improvement Associ- 
ation and petition c 91 
Committee authorized to visit other cities a 176, c 181, 185, 
205 ; authorized to report in print a 574, c 576 ; report a 
686 ; referred to next city council c 692, a 700 
Beacon St., building authorized a 416 
Brighton, annual report supt. a 14 
Broadway, annual report supt. a 14 

Supt. nominated a 127 ; elected c 148, a 156 ; assistant ap- 
pointed a 388 
Repairs authorized a 388 
Closed for examination a 520 
Broadway extension, bridge over Boston and Albany R.R. a 

483, 650 
Berkeley St., repairs a 403 

Canal, annual report of commissioner c 32 ; commissioner ap- 
pointed a 125 
Chelsea st., annual report supt. a 14, 62 

Supt. nominated a 127 ; petitions a 143, 518 ; elected c 148, 
a 156 
Columbus av., repairs a 403 

Chelsea, supts. nominated and elected a 126 ; assistant appointed 
388 
Supt. north draw, orders to nominate and fix salary, a 
403 ; nomination and election a 471 ; salary — see 
Salaries 
Widening, etc., order to petition a 47, c 49 
Rebuilding, orders passed a 318, o. 319, 340, a 367 
Telegraph poles, petition a 663 
Congress St., annual report supt. a 28 

Supt. nominated a 127 ; elected c 148, a 156 ; assistant ap- 
pointed 388 
Telegraph poles, petition a 349 
Closing a 500 
Cragie's — see Canal 

Cambridge St., supt. nominated and elected a 126 ; assistant ap- 
pointed 388 
Repair authorized a 514 
Charles river, annual report supt. a 62 

Supt nominated a 127 ; elected c 148, a 156 ; deceased, pay 
authorized c 382, 390, a 400 ; vacancy, order to nominate 
a 403; petitions c 396, a 400; election a 458, c 400; 
salary to Sept. 9, a 514, c 523, 536 
Assistant supt. appointed a 388 
Dover st., annual report supt. a 14 

Supt. nominated a 127 ; elected c 148, a 156 ; assistant ap- 
pointed 388 
Telephone poles a 589 
Dartmouth st., repairs a 403 
Essex St., supt. nominated and elected a 126 

Repairs authorized a 388 
Federal st., annual report supt. a 14 

Supt. nominated a 127 ; elected c 148, a 156 ; assistant ap 

pointed 388 
Sidewalk, order passed a 558 



X 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Ferdinand st., repairs a 403 

Cranite, supt. aoniinated and elected a 126 

Huntington av., repairs a 403 

Maiden, supt. nominated a 127; elected c 148, a 156; assistant 

.- 1 ) n u int oil 383 
Marginal st., annual report supt. a 14 

.Meridian St., annual report supt. a 14 j supt. nominated a 127 ; 
petition 143; elected c 143, a 156, c 160; assistant ap- 
pointed 388 
Metropolitan It. R. Co., tracks, petition a 59 : report, order 

notice 417 ; bearing 4o."> ; order passed 621 
Telephone polos, permit a 335 
Mt. Washington av., annual report supt. a 14 ; supt. nom- 
inated a 127; petitions c 136, a 148, e 148; elected 
C 148, a 156; assistant appointed 388 
Repairs authorized a 431 
Neponset, supt. nominate. I and elected a 126 

Telephone poles a 589 
North Beacon St., supt. nominated and elected a 126 
North 11 -n-vard st., supt. nominated aud elected a 126 ; assistant 

appointed 388 
Northern av., construction, petition a 499, c 502 
Prison point, annual report of commissioner c 32: commis- 
sioner nominated and elected a 127, c 186 
West Boston, annual report of commissioner c 32 ; commissioner 
nited a 12a 
Claims : persona! injuries a 93, c 99 
Western av. to Cambridge, $200 for widening and repairs a 
112; supt. nominated and elected a 126; assistant ap- 
pointed 388 
Western av. to Water town, supt. nominated and elected a 126 
Warren, supt. nominated a 127 : elected e 148, a 156 ; assistant 
appointed 
Claims : personal injuries a 270, c 283 ; a 327, c 337 ; a 429, 

c 436 : a 4'iy, c 475 ; a 551, e 559 
Telephone fixtures, petition a 499; permit 514 
West Chester park, repairs a 403 
Brigham, William 10. et at. — 

Prince st. (ward _3), lamps, petition a 533 
Brighton avenue — 

ti dI.I and Stock Telegraph Co., attachment of wire to fire-alarm 
poles, leave to withdraw a 47, c 49 

Macadamizing a s9 

Claims: for damages a 77, c 86, a 246, c 249 

Sidewalk: from Harvard to St. Paul sts., petition a 93 : order 

passed 483 
Corner Auburn St.. abatement of sidewalk assessment a 174 
Bprinkling : from Beacon st. to B. & A. R. bridge a 199 
Crossing : petition a 443 ; report 467 
Stable: coiner Market st., petition a 499 ; permit 515 
Brighton street (Charlestowu) — 

Sidewalk: No. 15, petition a 448 j order passed 458 

No. 17, petition a 468 ; order passed 500 
Brighton street (ward 8)— 

Claims: personal injuries, damages to vehicle, petition a 586, 

c 601 

Brighton, town of — 

Accounts of late treasurer, aud bill for services, a 124, c 130, a 
402, c406, a 410, c 419 
Brimbecom, Nathaniel, councilman (ward 18) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on salaries c 11 ; Stony brook 11 
Remark- : 

2. r ,iiih anniversary 478 
Salary superintendent Chelsea bridge 670 
brimmer, Martin — 

Atlantic av. and South Market st., sidewalk, petition a 241 
Brimmer street — 

Telephone poles : petition a 327; report and order of notice 367; 
hearing postponed 400, 426; leave to withdraw 407 
Brintnall, Benjamin, councilman (ward 3) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on public buildings ell; new bridge to 

Charlestowu c 21 
Elected : director of Kast Boston ferries a 29 c 31, 55 
Resignation 256 
Broad street — 

Metropolitan Railroad Co., tracks a 155, 213, 247 
Broadway — 

Extension a 84, c 86, 108, 122, a 125, 143, c 146, 166, a 349, c 354, 
a 360, c 373, 382, a 383 
Damages a 42J, 446 

Damages, petition a 480; leave to withdraw 515 
Claims : personal injuries a 109, c 120, a 352, c 354, a 629, e 635, 

652, a 663 
Sidewalk : estate corner M St., order passed a 248 
Passenger wagon : corner Dorchester st. to Oakland gardens, 

petition a 314; permit 352 
Bridge: over Boston & Albany R.R. a 483, 650 
Broderick, James — 

Commercial st. wideniug, grade damages, petition a 663 
Brogie, Thomas — 

Iremont st. (ward 25), stable a 30 
Brook avenue — 

Reconveyance of land a 258 

Sidewalks : at 32, petition a 499; order passed 574 



Brookline avenue — 

Confirmatory deed of land c 18, a 26, 97, c 106 

Winnislmmet Co., release of lands a 64, c 67 

Sprinkling: from Beacon st. to Maple av. a 199; from Maple 

av. a 199 
Crosswalks: petition a 209; report a 217 
Brookline Qas Light Co. — 

Contract authorized a 352 
Brooks, George II. et al. — 

Faneuil st. (ward 25), petition to put in order a 59 
Brooks, (i. P.— 

Dudley st . Cphani's Comer), druggist's mortar, petition a 456, 
c 460; report a 472 
Brooks, William F. — 

Appointed: superintendent of Faneuil Sail a 59 ; inspector of 
provisions at large a 93 
Brooks street (ward 1) — 

Movement of wooden building to No. 28 a 174 
Stable : petition a 213; leave to withdraw 335 
Brown avenue — 

Junction of Florence st. widening, damages a 46J 
Brown, Alfred S., councilman (ward 23) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on public buildings c 11; public insti- 
tutions 11; Stony brook 11 
Elected : trustee of Mt, Hope cemetery a 44, c 55 
Remarks : 

Commonwealth av. 74 
Appropriation bill 185 
Death of .Joseph Kenuey203 
Resignation of councilman Brintnall 256 
Stony brook 272, 354 
Clnirlestown almshouse 284 
Law department 394 
Pay of laborers 409 
Repairs on the council chamber 477 
Public parks 513 
Purchase of land on Clay st. 532 
Treatment of the poor 673 
Brown, Atherton T. — 

Mt. Pleasant av., removal of trees, authorized a 29 
Corner Mt. Pleasant av. and Fairland St., edgestones, sidewalk, 
petition a 241 
Brown, Edwin Y. — 

Appointed: public weigher a 125; inspector aud weigher of 
bundle hay a 125 
Brown, K. Barton — 

50 Telegraph St., sidewalks, report and order a 179 
Brown, Henry A. — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer stall 87, a 630 
Brown, John A. — 

Appointed superintendent of East Boston scales a 189 
Brown, Mortimer — 

Neponset av., permit to occupy sidewalk a 198 
Brown, Moses P.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
Brown, Ruth C. — 

110 Commonwealth av., sidewalk, petition a 230; order passed 
a 24 s 
Brown, T. (J. — 

Englewood av., Brighton, plank walk, petition a 13 
Brown, W L. — 

Forest Hill st., edgestones, petition a 425; order passed 447 
Browne, Andrew .1. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Browne, Charles, heirs of— 

Lincoln st., widening, S6412. 50 damages a 144 
Browne, Edward I., trustee — 

407-409 Washington St., sewer assessment, petition a 124 ; re- 
144 
Browne, Edward 1. et a/. — 

Lincoln st., steam tunnel, petition a 365; permit 889, 416 
Brow ni igg, .Jane— 

Comineici.il-st. widening, $5400 damages a 111 
Bryant, John — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161, a 175, c 182 
Bryant, John D., trustee — 

Centre and Bond sts., sewer assessment a 144 

Buckingham street — 

le: petition a 443; permit 458; petition a 465 
Bu.'bee, C. M.— 

Commercial st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 139 
Buildings — [see also Schools] — 

Public ouildims — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Furniture, repairs, etc. authorized a 30, c 31, 54 

James C. Tucker nominated and elected superintendent 

a >;i,c87 
Annual report of superintendent c 55 
Iron doors, office of city registrar a 48, c 49 
City Hall, numbering rooms c 92, 122, a 125 

\ i nidation of aldermanic chamber a 177, c 181 

Location of departments e 673 ; indefinitely postponed 
a 678 ; orders and resolve passed c 695 
East Boston high school and municipal court c 207, a 211, 

300, c 307, a 315, 366, 389, 666, c 670 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XI 



Armory building a 389, c 390, 410, 606, a 613 

Sale of school-house lots c 410, a 415 

Free use of ward-rooms a 416, c 418 

Repairs ou the council chamber c 476, a 480, c 532 

Use of ward-room in ward 3, petition a 663, c 670 ; permit 
c 695, a 700 
Faneuil Hull — 

Standing committee a 12, 29 

William F. Brooks appointed superintendent a 59 

Portraits a 247, e 249, a 258, c 295, 307 

Portrait of rear-admiral Winslow a 95, 145, c 146, 166, a 177, 
c 181. 201 

Free use a 416 

Petitions for use of a 15, 174, 241, 297, 349, 425, 443, 456 

Permits for use of a 15, 212, 247, 300, 336, 367, 447, 467, 483, 
500, 534, 546 
County buildings— 

Standing committee a 12, 29 

Repairs and furniture authorized a 48 

George K. Niles, trustee, claim for loss and rent for property 
taken for court-house a 93 

New court-house — see County of Suffolk 
Survty and inapection of buildings — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 13 

Topics in Mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 

Fire in Federal and Devonshire sts. c 21, a 26 

Annual report a 115 

Clerical assistance, purchase of supplies, and other ex- 
penses authorized a 212, c 220 

Examination of manufacturing establishments a 353, c 354, 
373, 396, 398, 407, 410, a 415, c 419, 424 

Semi-annual report a 383 

Permits during vacation a 388, c 390 

.John S. Damrell appointed inspector a 518, c 523 

Additional inspectors c 585, a 586 

Petition for change in building laws a 665, c 670 
Wooden buildings — erection, alteration, etc. — 

" Certain wooden buildings," erection, petition c 636, a 663 

Alford St., extension, petition c 565, a 568 

A st. erection, petition c 694, a 700 

Burnham's whf. erection c 256, a 258 ; permit a 350, c 354 

Blue Hill av. corner Central av. (ward 24), erection, permit 
a 350, c 354 

Border St. No. 17, enlargement, petition a 365, c 370 

Border St. No. 128, erection, petition a 465, c 475 ; report 
c 526, a 533 

Bay -State wharf, 334-374 Albany St., erection, petition 
a 468, c 475 ; permit c 526, a 533 

Cambridge St. a 13, c 16 

Columbia st. a 59, c 66, a 94, c 99, 106 

Commercial St., (ward 6), a 109, 127 

Chelsea St., enlargement, Beacon Oil Co. al75,c 181, a 209, 
c 220, 238, a 243 

Cary opposite Riverside st. (ward 19), a 209, c 220, 238, a 243 

Chelsea near Centre st. (ward 1), enlargement, petition a 
349, c 354 ; permit c 379, a 383 

Cambridge st. rear, opposite Brighton st. (ward 4), enlarge- 
ment, petition a 365, c 370 ; permit a 402, c 405 

Commonwealth flats, Fort Point Channel (ward 13), erec- 
tion, petition c 475, a 480 ; permit c 526. a 533 

Chaucer St. (nearly opposite) erection, petition c 536, 
a 543 

Chelsea near Glendon st. erection, petition a 543, c 548 

Cambridge rear Everett St. (ward 25), erection, petition a 
586, c 601 

Devon near Fourth st. (ward 25) , a 94. c 99. 106, a 126 

Ovon corner Fourth st. (ward 25), a 109, c 120, a 126, c 130 

toetSwett st. a 43, c 49, a 110 

Everett st. (ward 2), No. 47, extension, petition a 276, c 
283 ; report a 350, c 354 ; removal, permit a 521 

East Sixth st. City Point (ward 14), erection, petition a327, 
c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 

Everett St. (ward 2), No. 45, erection, petition c 346 

East Third near K st. erectiou, petition c 373, a 383 

East Fifth st. No. 779, enlargement, petition c 475, a 480; 
permit c 526, a 533 

F st. a 59, c 66, a 126, c 130 

First st. No. 60, a 139, c 146, 173, a 175 

Forest Hills st. near Washington st. ( ward 23), a 209, c 220, 
238, a 243 

Foundry st. (ward 13), corner Dorchester a v. erection, peti- 
tion a 327, c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 

Foundry nearly opposite Division st. near West Fourth st. 
erection, petition a 551, c 559 

Farnham near Gerard St., petition a 613, c 621 

Front st. rear near Union st. (ward 5), erection, petition a 
663. c 670 

Grand Junction wharf a 124, c 130, 173, a 175 

Grand Junction wharf, erection, petition c 373, a 383 

Geneva av. (ward 24), erection, petition a 543, c 518 

Kendrick, rear Lake st. (ward 25), wooden addition to 
building, petition c 581, a 536, 591, c 601 

Longwood av. between Nos. 93 &97, a 109, c 120, a 120, 
c 130 

Longwood av. opposite Worthington St., enlargement, peti- 
tion c 475, a 480 ; permit c 526, a 533 



Marginal St., Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn It. Co., ex- 
tension c 188, a 189, c 238, a 243, c 379, a 383 
Mt. Pleasant av. (ward 20), No. 11, erection, petition a 327, 

c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 
Marginal near Jeffries st. (ward 2), enlargement, petition 

a 349, c 354 
Market near Winship st. erection, petition a 465, c 475 ; 

permit c 526, a 533 
Market St., rear, near Western av., erection, petition a 465, 

o 475 ; permit a 471 
Market st. rear Winship av.( ward 25), erection, petition c 601 
North Beacon st. opposite Lyman av., erection, petition 

a 465, c 475 ; permit c 526, a 533 
North Beacon near Cambridge st. (ward 25), wooden addition 

to building, petition c 601 
P and Kast tirst sts. (ward 14), a 124, c 130, 173, a 175 
Park st. near Pelton st. (ward 23), erection, petition a 465, 

c 475 ; permit c 526, a 533 
Pope st. near Moore st. (ward 1), erection, petition a 518 
Rutherford av. (ward 5), erection, petition a 327, c 3.7; 

permit a 350, c 354 
Riverside st. No. 20-22, wooden addition to building, peti- 
tion a 591, c 601 
South near Magazine st. (ward 20), a 43. c 49, 106 
Stearns wharf, Albany st. a 93, c 99, a 126, c 130 
Sumner St. (ward 2), No. 73-79, erection, petition a 629, 

c 635, 694, a 700. 
Walden st. (ward 22), a 109 

Washington near Euclid St. a 124, c 130, 173, a 175 
Williams st. (ward 5), No. 26, extension, petition a 297, 

c 307 ; permit a 350, c 354 
West Broadway (ward 13), No. 287, extension, petition 

a 297, c 307 ; permit a 350, c 354 
West Fourth st. near O.C.R.R. (ward 13) , erection, petition 

a 327, c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 
Water st. (ward 5), No. 62, wooden addition to building, 

petition c 565, a568 
Water st. (ward 5J, No. 63, erection, petition a 629, c 635 
Wooden buildings— removals : 

" Certain wooden buildings," permit to move a 317, 458, 

471, 483, 574 
Bennington No. 232 to 28 Brooks st. (ward 1) a 174 
Blue Hill av. junction with Norfolk st. to Milton liue (ward 

24), petition a 327 ; permit 350 
Commercial st. No. 450 to 7 Henchman St., petition a 297 
Chelsea to Curtis cor. Pope St., petition a 468 
Chester park and Boston & Albany R.li. (ward 11), to 

Rogers av. near Bay View place (ward 22), petition a 

543; permit 55S 
Centre st. No. 208 to near Highland st. (ward 21), petition 

a 568; permit 589 
Dudley No. 321 to Langdon St., permit a 416 
Dudley st. across, permit a 447 

Dorchester av. to Adams st. (ward 24), petition a 241 ; per- 
mit 483 
East Chester park near Washington st. to East Chester 

park near Swett St. a 155, 179 
East Second No. 912 to rear 582 East Third st. a 209, 217 
East Fourth near II st. to East Broadway opposite horse- 
car stables a 276 
East Sixth st. No. 879 across street, petition a 499; permit 

521 
Everett st. (ward 2). petition a 518 
First to N st. a 59, 85 

Foundry st. (ward 13), petition a 518; permit 534 
Hampshire to Vernon st. a 124 
Howard st. (ward 20) a 248 

Hampshire No. 8i and 89 to Mahan av. (ward 19) a 258 
Henchman st. No. 29 to No. 7 a 297 

Harrison av. No. 454, 200 ft., petition a 443: permit 456 
Marginal st. (Grand Junction) to No. 301 Marginal St., 

petition a3S3; permit 404 
Marginal St. No. 119 to 124, petition a 465 
Northampton st. No. 728 to Albany st. (ward 18), petition 

a 586 ; permit 650 
Princeton st. No. 248 to 232 Bennington st. a 155, 179 
P st. No. 14 to No. 61, a 209, 217 
P st. near East Second st. to No. 582 East Third st. a 209, 

217 
Plympton near Albany st. to street near Harrison av. 

a 209, 248 
Putnam No. 90 to 103 Porter st. (ward 1), petition a 591 

permit 650 
Saratoga st. No. 64 to Border near Lexington st., petition 

a 327 ; permit 367 
Saratoga opposite Curtis st. to Curtis corner Pope St., 

petition a 468 
Union av. to Washington st. (ward 23), petition a 443; 

permit 45S 
Washington to Gibson st. (ward 24), a 109, 159 
Washington to I'arkman st. (ward 24), a 124, 159, 24S 
Washington to Capen st. (ward 24), a U0l>, 248 
Webster st. (ward 2), No. 221 to 2S7, petition a 443 
Webster No. 227 to Margiual near Jeffries st., petition a 463 
Western av. near North ilarvard St. to North Harvard St. 

(rear) near Western av. (ward 25), permit a 416 



XII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



West First St. (ward 14), No. 370 to West First corner F 

Bt. ( ward 18), petition a 211 ; permit 483 
West Seventh near B st. to 28 West Seventh st. a 174 
Bulflnch, Francis V. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Bulfinch street — 

Petition to put in order a 383 
Billiard, B. I\ S. et al.— 

.1 unction of Cabot and Culvert sts., crosswalks, report a 248 
Bullard, Eleazer, et al. — 

Pearl st. ( Dorchester) , fewer, petition a 533 ; order notice 534 ; 
bearing 543; order passed . : >47 
Bullard, J. 0.— 

Western av., relocation at Brighton, §180 damages a 688 
Bullock, ('. K. tt al.— 

Holbrook St., sewer, petition a 468 
Hunker Hill street — 

Middlesex Railroad Co,, tracks a 43 
Crosswalks : from Moulton st., petition a 124 
At Pearl st., petition a 174 
From Marion st., petition c 410, a 413 
Sidewalks: from Tufts to Everett st., petition a 518 
Burchani, Charles — 

Appointed constable a456 
Burch street (W.R.) — 

Grading, petition a 26 
Burgess, N. II. — 

77 l J East Fifth st. (ward 14), wooden building, petition c 475, 
a 480; permit c 526, a 533 
Burke, Michael — 

Sumner st. near Jeffries st. (ward 2), stable, petition a4C0; 
permit 415 
Burke, Thomas F. — 

Chelsea bridge, petition for appointment as superintendent a 518 
Burkhardt. G. F.— 

Parker st., projection of platform upon sidewalk, petition a 59; 
permit a 85 
Burnett, Joseph, it al. — 

Foster st. sewer, petition a 514; order passed 520 
Burnett, Man .lane — 

Curtis cor. Popest. (ward 1), stable, petition a 514; permit 534 
Burnham, Allan \V. — 

Appointed: measurer of wood and hark a 139; public weigher 
a 139 

Burnham, Choate— 

Ninth and Lowland sts., macadamizing, edgestones, petition a 97 
Burnham, C. & Son — 

Burnbam's wharf, wooden building, petition c 256; permit a 
350, c 354 
Burnham, Reuben A. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Burnbam's wharf (ward 15) — 

Wooden building : petition to erect c 256, a 258; permit a 350, 
c 35 1 
Burns, T. J.— 

Appointed field driver and pound keeper a 214, c 222 
Burrell, Isaac 8. — 

Fleeted street commissioner a 666 
Burrill, Adoniram — 

Fast Third st., taxes remitted, estate forfeited a 112, c 120 
Burrill, Charles — 

Claim tor services rendered and money expended in 1864 a 115, 
126, 144, 212, 245, 800, 31s, 335, 367, c 373, a 688, c 692 
Burroughs street — 

Sewer: abatement a 47, 98, 335 
Assessment a 98 

Crosswalk : petition a 241 

Sidewalks: petition a 413 ; order passed 467 
es : remonstrance a 533 

Stable: petition a 543; permit 574 
Burt, George I.. — 

Fleeted trustee of. Mt. Hope cemetery c 222, a 230 
Burt. .1. II. & Co.— 

Blue Hill av. near Oakland St., stable, petition a 414 ; permit 
429 
Burt. .1. II., Sumner A. & George L. — 

Norfolk st. at Blue Hill av., widening, damages, petition a 587 
Burwell, George— 

Charter st., druggist's mortar a 13, 29 
Butcher's Slaughtering and Melting Association — 

Market st. (ward 25), stable, petition a 442; permit 446 

Market st. near Winship St., erection of wooden building, peti- 
tion a 166, e 475 ; permit c 526, a 533 

Market st. rear Winship av., wooden building, petition c 601 
Butler John E. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Butler, William F.— 

Fleeted secoud assistant assessor a 155, c 161 

C street — 

■ walk : corner Seventh St., order passed a 317 
Edges tone, sidewalk : at 139, petition a 365 : order passed 404 
Sewer : between Fourth and Fifth sts., petition a 425 
Edgestones : between Eighth and Ninth sts., petition a 56S 

Cabot street — 

Stable : No. 170, petition a 124 



Nos. 215, 217 — see Culvert place 
Crosswalk : junction of Culvert St., report a 248 

At Dallas pi., petition a 258 ; report 534 
Sprinkling: near Linden park a 258 

Edgestones, sidewalk : at 227, petition a 400; order passed 416 
Petition a 425 : order passed 447 
No. 229, order passed a 500 
Caddlgan, John J. — 

Elected weigher and inspector of lighters a 197, o 201, 225 
Caldwell. Joseph, alderman — 
Klceted and qualified 327 

Appointed: committee on county accounts, licenses, markets, 
state aid, assessors' department, Fast Boston ferries, harbor, 
health, overseers of poor, public instruction, surveyors' 
department, treatment of the poor, Charlestown bridge 327 ; 
reducing number of constables 415 
Remarks : 

250th anniversary 435 

Discharging cargo in harbor 407 

Inspectors of election 482 

Charlestown almshouse 482 

Constitutional amendment abolishing tax qualification of 

voters 553 
Telegraph and telephone wires 555 
Public clock in Dorchester 557 
New court-honse 336, 599, 607 
soup 613 
point park 631 
Transfer of powers to overseers of poor 676, 701 
N. n bridge to Charleston 
(an' <>l neglected children 688 
Calef, George W.— 

Barges from Bowdoin square to Litchfield's wharf, etc., petition 
a 139; permit a 176 
Call street (West Koxbury)— 

; ition a 209 ; order passed a 248 
Poles : petition a 591 ; permit 631 
Callahan, Cornelius J. — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Congress st. bridge a 
3S8 
Callahan, Jeremiah J. — 

Appointed weigher of coal a 189 
Callahan, Matthew J.— 

Elected superintendent Congress st. bridge c 149, a 156 
Callahan, Thomas F. — 

Conditional release on probation a 501 
Callender B. tt al.— 

Walnut av. near Elmore St., lamps, petition a 327 
Calnan, P. J.— 

Sprinkling streets in Charlestown, petition a 189; permit a 212 
Cambell, Patrick — 

Taylor st. (ward 24, Neponset), stable, petition a 499: leave 
to withdraw I 
Cambridge and South Boston Railroad Associates- 
Application for route, order of notice a 425; hearing 456; re- 
red 465; leave to withdraw 516; notice of hearing, etc., 
before railroad commissioners 518; city solicitor instructed 
to appear 534 
Cambridge street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 26, c 31 ; injury to horse, corner 

Joy st., petition e I 
Tracks : connection of tracks on Charles St., permit a 618 
Cambridge street r charlestown) — 
I] 60 for land taken a 246 
Tracks: Middlesex Railroad Co., petition a 297 ; report and or- 
der of notice 367 ; hearing 400; permit 
Wo iden building: opposite Brighton St., enlargement, petition 

a :;05, c 370; permit a 402, c 405 
Widening : damages a 415 

Edgestones, etc. : abatements and reassessments a 467 
Cambridge street (ward 25) — 

Crossings : petition a 1:5 : petition a 59 ; report 483 
Sewer: abatements a 112,472, 558 
Sprinkling : " portion," order passed a 248 
Wooden buildings : enlargement, petition a 13, c 16 ; permit a 
47, <■ 19 

Erection, rear Everett St., petition a 586, c 601 
opposite Beacon park, petition a 
Camden street — 

Sewer: from line of Columbus av. extended to Tremont St., 
petition a 213; hearing 276; order passed a 2S2 

Grade : between Tremont st. and Providence 14., petition c 548, 
a 554 ; report a 614, c 621 
Campbell, Mary— 

11 Everett St., abatement of sidewalk assessment a 65 
Campbell, W. A. — 

Appointed weigher of coal a 209 
Canfield, Thomas — 

Injuries to team, petition a 26, c 31 
Canning, Samuel, jr. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
( 'antei -bury street — 

Petition to put in order a 43 

Lamps : from Walk Hill st. to Blue Hill av., petition a 349 
Capen, Aaron D. — 

River st. ward 24, grade damages, petition a 514 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XIII 



Capen street — 

Lamps : petition a 365, 568 
Carew, Jeremiah — 

Old Colony K. tracks, damages, petition and order of notice a 
244 : hearing a 297 
Carey Dennis A. — 

Brattle St., personal injuries, petition a 174, c 181 
Carey street — 

Sidewalks : No. 12-20, petition a 613 
Carney, James — 

Appointed public weigher a 314 
Carney, Mary — 

590 East Fourth St., sidewalks, report and order a 198 
Carpenter, William — 

Mercantile st., grading, paving, petition a 241 
Carr, Charles H. — 

Dorchester av., sewer, damages, petition a 468, c 475; leave to 
withdraw a 690, c 692 
Carr, J C— 

Deceased, pension due, communication from mayor referred 
a 426, c 436 ; order passed a 467, c 475 
Carson, Howard A. — 

Excavating machinery, purchase of right to use a 199, c 200, 
224, a 243 
Carter, Thomas W. — 

Albany St., reduction of rent of wharf property, petition a 297, 
c 307 ; order passed a 366, c 370 
Carter, William E. S. - 

Appointed constable a 258 
Carven, John — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161, a 175, c 182 
Cary, J II. et al. — 

New Williams street, grading, petition a 43 
Cary, William H — 

Appointed : surveyor of marble, soapstone and freestone a 125; 
public weigher a 125 
Cary street (ward 19) 

Opposite Riverside St., erection of wooden building a 209, c 220, 
238, 243 
Casson, John I. — 

24 Brooks st. (ward 2), stable, petition a 213; leave to with- 
draw 335 
Castle street — 

Sidewalk: petition a 213; order passed a 248; petition a 443; 
order passed 458 
Caton, Asa Harden, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on improved sewerage a 2; licenses 12 
steam engines 12; fuel 12; health 12; overseers of poor 12 
survey and inspection of buildings 13; pay of laborers 26 
new court-house 15; auditor's estimates 125; 250th anni- 
versary 243; fourth of July 243; state election returns 545; 
regulation of telegraph and telephone wires 556; municipal 
election returns 050 
Remarks : 

Waste of water 83 

City hospital 111 

Swett st. lime kiln 139 

Sherwin school-house 141 

South Boston Railroad stable 174 

Appropriation bill 196 

Pay of laborers 197, 217, 304 

Telegraph and telephone lines 261, 555 

West Roxbury and South Boston parks 267, 691 

Eaton square 297 

New court house 298, 597, 608, 611 

Burrill claim 300 

Barrel wagons 315, 328 

Centre st. sewer 333 

Name for Back Bay park 335 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 353, 415 

Fire alarms 416 

Rewards for detection and conviction of incendiaries 442 

250th anniversary 471 

Inspectors of election 482 

Polling place in ward 13 486 

Evening high school 519 

Constitutional amendment abolishing tax qualification of 

voters 553 
Public clock in Dorchester 557 
St. Elizabeth's hospital site 618 
The final proceedings 701 
Causeway street — 

Crosswalk: petition a 109 

Claims : personal injuries a 383, c 390 

Tracks : Portland to Lowell sts., permit a 618 

Between Haverhill and Commercial sts., permit a 618 
Cavagnaro, Francesca — 

Fleet st., personal injuries, petition c 32, a 43; leave to with- 
draw e 137, a 139 
Cavanagh, John — 

Movement of wooden buildings: from 466-469 to 458-460 Com- 
mercial st. (ward H), petition a 109 ; permit a 127 
From West Seventh St., near R st., to 28 West Seventh st. 

(ward 13), petition a 174 
From 321 Dudley st. to Langdon St., permit a 416 



Cavanagh, John & Son — 

Movement of wooden building: F'oundry st. (Ward 13), petition 
a 518 ; permit 534 
Cavanagh, W. R.— 

Movement of wooden buildings : from First st. to N st., petition 
a 59 ; permit a 85 
On Walden st. (ward 22), petition a 109 ; permit a 127 
From Washington st. to Gibson st. (ward 24), petition 

a 109 ; permit a 159 
From Washington st. to Parkman st. (ward 24), petition 

a 124 ; permit a 248 
From East Chester park, near Albany St., to East Chester 

park, near Swett St., petition a 155 ; permit a 179 
From 14 P st. to 61 P st. (ward 14), petition a 209 ; permit 

a 217 
From 370 West First st. (ward 14) to West First st., corner 

F st (ward 13) , petition a 241 ; permit 483 
From Dorchester av. (ward 24) to Adams st. (ward 24), 

petition a 241; permit 483 
From Washington St., near Euclid St., to Capen st. (ward 

24), petition a 209 ; leave to withdraw a 248 
From -879 East Sixth st. across St., petition a 499 ; permit 

521 
From Chester park and Boston & Albany railroad (ward 11) 
to Rogers av., near Bay View pi. (ward 22), petition 
a 543 ; permit 558 
Cavanagh, William — 

Movement of wooden building from East Fourth, near H st., to 

East Broadway, opposite horse-car stables, petition a 276 
" Certain wooden buildings," permit to move a 317, 574 
Cazcnove place — 

Sewer : petition a 109 ; report and order of notice a 144 ; hearing 

a 155 ; order to construct a 212 
Edgestones, sidewalk : petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
Cedar street — 

Tree : No. 73, petition a230 ; permit a 265 
Cedar street (Charlestown) — 

Sidewalk : at No. 10, petition a 258 ; report and order a 281 
Edgestones : petition a 327 ; order passed 350 
Cedar street (Dorchester) 

Petition to put in order a 43 
Celebrations — see Boston celebrations 
Cemeteries — 

Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove, joint standing committee, c 11, a 12 
Intramural interments — see Health 
Protection of cemeteries — see Legislative Matters 
Fourth Section cemetery (Fast Boston) drainage, c 21, a 26 
St. Joseph's, interment of body, petition a 77 ; leave to with- 
draw a 198 
Mt. Hope and Calvary, passenger wagon a 109, 176 
Cedar Grove ; commissioner nominated c 137 ; elected c 147, a 156 

Annual report a 306 
Mt. Hope; trustees nominated c 32, a 44; elected a 44, c 55 ; 
trustees at large nominated and elected a 214, c 222, a 230, 
petition of trustees that part of Back st. be graded a 43 
Mt. Hope and Forest Hills station, Mt. Hope and Grove Hall, 

coaches, petition a 276, permit 299 
Catholic Cemetery Association, permit to place signs at street 
corners a 500 
Census — 

Compilation of statistics from U. S. census referred a 664, c 670 
Central Massachusetts Telephone Co. — see Telephone wires. 
Central square (E. B.)— 
Paving a 77 

Urinal c 138, 147, a 156, c 160, a 329, 402, c 405, a 414, c 418 
Watering : " portion,'' petition a 297, c 307; leave to withdraw 
a 388, c 390 
Central street — 

Claims : damages a 124, c 130 

Paving: between custom-house and Atlantic av., petition a 327 
Central Trades and Labor Uuion — 

Stony-brook laborers, remonstrance a 516; report a 558, c 559 
Central wharf- 
No. 2, petroleum, etc. a 197 
Central Wharf and Wet Dock Corporation — 

Atlantic av., use of sidewalk, petition a 43; permit a 65 
Centre street — 

Edgestones : at 207, petition a 383; order passed 404 
Edgestones, sidewalks : at 193 and 195, order passed a 404 
Claims: personal injuries, damages to horses and wngon, peti- 
tion c 476, a 480 
Wooden building : movement from No. 208 to near Highland st. 
(ward 21) , petition a 568 ; permit 589 
Centre street (ward 24) — 

Poles: petition a 543; permit 589 
Centre street (ward 23)— 

Sprinkling: petition a 213 

Crosswalk : at Burroughs st., petition a 241 

Gutters: paving, petition a 241 

Playground : Speare lot, petition a 297, c 307 

Stables : Abram French, petition a 109; permit 128 

E. II. Williams, et al,, trustees, petition a 314; permit 350 
Poles : petition a 314; permit 389 

Between Seaverns av. and South St., permit a 631 
Passenger wagons : from Monument sq. to Allandale springs, 
petition a 327 ; permit 352 



XIV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Sewers : appeal from assessment a 124 
Abatement and assessment a 144 
Abatement a 174. 574 
Centre and l'oiul St., petition, request for special committee, 

leave to withdraw a 833, 473 
Between Lamartine st. and Wise pi., petition a 276 
Order of notice 317 ; hearing 327 ; order passed 402 
To Orchard St.. order notice a 467; remoustrauce 465 
Street lamps : petitions a 443, 456 
Petition to allow coasting on Manning's hill a 649 
Chadbourn. George B. et ul. — 

Washington Bt (ward 24) from School to Harvard sts., sewer, 
petition a 276 
Chadbourn, Levi — 

Appointed superintendent of south scales a 1*9 
Chadwick street — 

Edgestonea, gutters, sidewalks: adjacent to Orchard park, or- 
der passed a 248 
Chadwick Lead Works — 

Steam engine : petition a 13; hearing a 59; permit a 84 
Chadwick, J. II. H ul.— 

Use of Fancuil Hall , petition a 443 ; permit 4 17 
Chadwick & Skilliugs— 

180 Marlborough st., sidewalk, petition a 607 
Cbamberlin, Frederick W. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Chandler street — 

Claims : personal injuries, petition a 276, c 283 
'Change avenue — 

Lantern : Merchants' Hotel, petition a 97; permit 112 
Sewer : abatement and assessment a 515 
Chapin, Edward I). — 

F. II. market, leave to transfer stalls and cellar a 467 
Chapin, Nahum — 

Elected member of school committee a 605 
Chardon street — 

Steam pipe: permit a 516 
Charles river avenue (Charlcstown) — 
Telegraph poles : a 212. 230, 276, 318 
Curved track : Fitchburg R.R. Co , permit a 650 
Charles street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 109, c 120, a 216, c 249 

Damages a 276, c 283 
Paving : from Cambridge St. to Beacon St., order passed a 248 
Charlestown Square- 
Middlesex Uailroad Co., tracks a 43 
Charlestown street — 

Petroleum, etc. : Xos. 45-51, license a 335 
Charlestown and Milton Railroad Co. Associates — 

Application for route, order of notice a 447; hearing 465 ; re- 
ferred 463 ; leave to withdraw 516 ; notice of hearing etc. 
before railroad commissioners 518 ; city solicitor instructed 
to appear 534 
Charlestown (las Co. — 

Contract authorized a 246 
Charlestown Trade and Improvement Association — 

New bridge to Charlestown, memorial c 91 
Charter street — 

Druggist's mortar a 13, c 16, a 29 
Chase, George li. — 

Appointed trustee of public library a 189, c 201 
Chase, Laura L. — 

120 Commonwealth av. stable, petition a 676 ; leave to withdraw 
(per request) 701 
Chase, Marcellus W. — 

S2 Sudbury st., melting furnaces, petition a 629 ; permit 650 
Chase, X. E. et ul.— 

Use of Fanueil Hall, petition a 425 
Chase, It Gardner — 

Inquiry into acts offence viewers, petition a 327, c 337 
Chase, It. Stuart- 
Accounts of treasurer's department, bill for services a 586 
c 601 
Chauncy street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 109, c 120, a 335, c 337 

South Boston railroad, transfer of cars to Lincoln St. a 159, 179, 

198 
Additional cars, order passed a 630 
Metropolitan Railroad Co., deviation of track a 145 
Release of land to Mass. Charitable Mechanic Association a 650, 
C652 
Chelsea street (Charlestown) — 
Paving a 93 

Druggist's mortar at No. 9"), petition a 124 : permit a 144 
Between Henley and Mt. Vernon sts., additional track a 198 
Telegraph poles a 212, 318 

Sewer: between Perry and Medford sts , petition a 213 
Claims : personal injuries, petition a 425, c 436 ; leave to with- 
draw a 516. c 54S 
Wooden building : near Glcudon St., petition a 543, c 548 
Chelsea street (B.B.)— 

Maverick Oil Co., license to manufacture and store petroleum 

a 01, 158 
Beacon Oil Co., enlargement of wooden building, permit a 175, 
c 181 : petition a 209, C 220 ; permit c 238, a 243 ; license to 
manufacture petroleum a 2S0 



Macadamizing: from Maverick sq. to Decatur St., petition a 349 
Wooden building : near Centre st., enlargement, petition a 349, 

c 354 ; permit c 379, a 383 
Sidewalks, edgestonea : petition a 425 
Moving wooden building to Curtis, corner l'ope St., petition 

a 468 
Cheny street (Roxbury) — 

Grade damages, petition a 568 
Cherry street — 

Grading, edgestones, gutters, gravelling, from Quincy st. to 

Blue Hill av., order passed a 281 
Chestnut Hill avenue (ward 25) — 

Sprinkling: " portion," order passed a 248 
Stable : petition a 499 ; permit 515 
Chestnut street (ward 23) — 

Stable : petitiion a 109 ; permit a 128 
Chestnut street (ward 9) — 

Stable : petition a 456 ; permit 467 
Cheswell, W. T.— 

Bnlfiuch st , petition to put in order a 383 
Cheyne, William — 

Corner II and Ninth sts., sidewalk, order pasred a 458 
Child, Dudley R., councilman (ward 17) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on assessors' department 11 ; public 

library 11 ; 250th anniversary 239 ; funeral of councilman 

Perkins 634 
Remarks : 

School expenditures 6 

\ Bsessora' department 68 

Salaries of city officers 150 

South-end branch library 250, 273, 323, 341, 622 

Evasion of taxes 271 

250th anniversary 438 

Public parks 513, 531 

Death of councilman Perkins 632 
Childs. Abner C. et <il. — 

mite av., lamps, petition a 456 
Childs street (ward 23) — 

Stable: petition a 443 : permit 458 

Sewer: petition a 456; order notice 500; hearing 514; order 
passed 531 

Abatement a 335 
Lamps : petition a 468 
Christal, James, councilman (ward 8) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on East Boston ferries c 11 ; surveyor's 

department 11 ; pay of laborers 22 
Remarks : 

Rules and orders of common council 6 

Joint rules and orders 10 

Old state house 17 

Street crossings 20 

Tay of laborers 21, 106, 364, 409 

Contested seat in ward 16 36 

Contract system 40 

City hospital 50, 104 

Decoration day 55, 290, 325 

Washington's birthday 57 

Assessors' department 58, 68 

Recess during elections 67 

Superintendents of bridges 148 

Salaries of city officers 149 

Badges 152 

Second assistant assessors 154,208 

Extension of Broadway 167 

Appropriation bill 183 

Carson's excavating machine 200 

Bridge to Charlestown 205 

Death of Councilman Joseph Healy 219 

City forester's greenhouse 220, 233 

Trustees of City hospital 274 

Charlestown almshouse 285 

Inscriptions on statues 31'2 

Use of council chamber 322 

South-end branch library 323 

Fourth of July 347, 355 

Barrel wagons 858, 391 

Fire alarms 419 

Rewards for detection and conviction of incendiaries 437 

2 JOth anniversary 440, 478 

Public parks 529 

Purchase of land on Clay st. 532 
immittee on legislative matters fi64 

Visitors to city hospital on Sundays 583 

Enlargement of City hospital 606 

lit vised ordinances 661 

Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 66S 

Treatment of the poor 672 

(are of neglected children 693 
Church of St. Augustine, South Boston — 

Irou fence, petition a 268 ; boundary line adjusted a 666, c 670; 

clock, order passed a 557, c 559 
Church street (ward 25) — 
Lamps: petition a 327 
Church-st. district — see Lands 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OP CITY COUNCIL. 



XV 



Chute, Edwin J. et al. — 

Reading St., between Maiden lane and Swett St., sewer, petition 
a 443 
City architect — see Architect 
City charter- 
Topic in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 
Committee on revision a 44, c 49 
General meetings of voters — see Legislative matters 
City clerk — 

S. F. McCleary elected and qualified 4 
Quarterly reports a 77, 245, 427, 554 
City council — 

Organization of the government 1 

"Election of city clerk 4 

Index to volumes of proceedings c 41, 55, a 59 
City engineer — see Engineer 
City hospital — see Hospitals 
City laborers — see Laborers 
City messenger — see Messenger 
City officers (elections, etc.) — 

Clerk of common council 3 

City clerk 4 

Mayor's clerk a 13 

Assistant city clerk a 15 

Trustees Mt. Hope cemetery a 44, c 55, a 214, c 222, a 230 

Trustees City hospital a 29, c 31, a 213, c 222, a 230, c 232, a 241, 
c 249, 273, a 276, c 292 

Directors East Boston ferries, a 29, c 31, 55, 147, a 156, c 274, 
a 276 

Trustees Public library a 29, c 31, 55, a 189, c 201 

Weighers of coal, a 26, 59, 83, 109, 155, 189, 209, 213, 297, 365, 
400, 499 

Inspector of milk a 59 

City messenger a 64, c 87 

Assessors a 93, c 99 

Superintendent of streets a 63, c 87 

City engineer c 87, a 144, c 147 

Superintendent of sewers a 64, c 87 

City solicitor c 64, 87 

Clerk of committees a 64, c 71, 87 

Water registrar a 64, c 87 

City surveyor a 64, c 87 

Superintendent of lamps a 59 

Superintendent of Faneuil Hall a 59 

Superintendent of Faneuil Hall market a 59 

City registrar a 64, c 87 

Measurers of wood and bark a 26, 125, 133, 209, 297, 400 

Weighers of bundle hay a 43, 83, 125, 155 

Public weighers 13, 26, 109, 125, 139, 189, 209, 213, 241, 297, 314, 
400, 426, 514 

Managers of Old South Association c 18, a 29 

Directors of public institutions a 29, c 31, a 44, c 55, a 63, c 67, 
a 77, c 86, a 159, 175, c 187, 201, a 211, 214, c 222, 223, a 230 

Superintendent of public buildings a 64, c 87 

City architect c 87 

Harbor master a 83 

Superintendent of public grounds c 87, a 94, c 100, a 110 

Inspector of provisions at large a 93 

Superintendent of public lands a 63, c 87, a 98, c 100, a 110, 
c 122, a 125, c 136, a 139 

Registrar of voters a 109 

Sealer of weights and measures a 109 

Deputy sealer of weights and measures, a 109,365 

Measurer of leather a 109 

First assistant assessors c 120, a 124, c 130, a 139, c 147, a 156, 
c 160, a 175, c 181 

Measurers of grain a 125, 155 

Commissioner on West Boston and Craigie's bridges a 125 

Inspector of petroleum and coal oils a 125 

Surveyors of marble, soapstone, and freestone a 125 

Record commissioners a 125, c 131 

Police commissioners a 125, 145, 155, c 161 

Member of board of health a 125, c 131, 147 

Superintendents of bridges a 126, c 136, a 143, c 148, a 156, c 160, 
a 458, c 460, a 471 

Commissioner of Prison-point bridge a 127, c 136 

Overseers of poor a 144, c 147, 172, a 175, c 182 

Commissioner of Cedar Grove cemetery c 147, a 156 

Second assistant assessors c 154, a 155, c 160, a 175, c 182, 202, 
204, 207, a 211, 214, c 222, a 230, c 232, a 244 

Undertakers a 174, 189, 297, 327, 413, 456, 481, 533 

Superintendents of hay scales a 189 

Measurers of upper leather a 189, 209 

Assistant clerk of committees a 189, c 200 

Assistant city messengers a 1S9, c 200 

Weighers and inspectors of lighters a 197, c 225 

Fire commissioner a 209, c 222 

Member of Boston water board a 209, c 222 

Sinking fund commissioner a 212, c 222 

Pence viewers, etc. a 214, c 222 

Inspector of lime a 214, c 222 

Culler of hoops and staves a 214, c 222 

Field drivers and pound keepers a 214, c 222, a 335, c 337 

Inspectors of elections a 481, 485, 499, 514, 518, 533 

Inspector of vinegar a 241, 400 

Collector of taxes, a 280, c 291 



Auditor of accounts a 280, c 291 
City and county treasurer a 280, c 291 
Park commissioner c 322, a 329 

Assistant superintendents of bridges a 388 
Inspector of hay and straw a 400 

Inspector of buildings a 518, c 523 
Street commissioner a 665 

School committee a 665 
City registrar — see Births, marriages and deaths 
City scales — see Scales 
City Solicitor — see Law department 
City square — 

Telephone pole : corner Charles river av, remonstrance a 230 
City surveyor — see Surveyor 
Claim; — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12, c 648 

Payments of executions or judgments of courts authorized, 
a 2, c 5 

Burrill claim, a 115, 126, 144, 212, 245, 300, 318, 335, 367, 
c 373, a 688, c 692 

Tjix titles sec 'jTfixes 

Allen, Loring & Co. a 116, c 120, a 158, c 160 

Atkinson, Sarah C. c 137, a 13a, c 295, a 297 

Arnold, Albert E. a 327, c 337 

Ames, S. & H. a 588, c 601 

Bachelder. Cyrus T. a 26, c 31, a 158, c 160 

Bartlett, W. E. a 59, c 66, a 97, c 106 

Bates, Joseph N. c 73, a 77 

Boardman, Arthur F. a 297, c 307 

Boardmau, Joseph L. a 297, c 307 

Barry, Michael a 276, e 283 

Baldwin, Annie N. c 346, a 500, c 502 

Bangs, William A. a 93, c 99 

Bailey, It C. c 476, a 480 

Blair, John c 694, a 700 

Oroniu, Catherine c 18, a 26, c 137, a 139 

Canfield, Thomas a 26, c3I 

Cavagnaro, Francisca c 32, a 43, c 137, a 139 

Carey, Dennis A. a 174, c 181 

Crockett, Edwin L. a 209, c 220 

Claflin. Arthur B. a 241, c 249 

Connor, David a 327, c 337. a 388, c 399 

Curran, Ellen c 364, a 365, c 410, a 415 

Connerton, Ellen a 629, c 635 

Cluse, Thomas F. a 663, c 670 

Donovan, John c 57, a 59, c 106, a 110 

Daniels, Albert W. a 77, c 86, a 246, c 249 

Dove, Honora a 97, c 99 

Davis, Ormus C. a 109, c 120 

Downing, Emanuel c 120, a 125, c 565, a 568 

Demain, Mrs. Mary C. c 120, a 125 

Day, Maria L. c 120, a 125 

Downs & Barron, a 124, c 130 

Delaney, Mary B. a 443, c 454 

Donehey, Maurise c 476, a 480 

Dickson. Marshall a 586, c 601 

Daley, Ellen M. J. c 694, a 700 

Egan, John a 213, c 220, a 264, c 268 

Edgarton, Mrs. M. J. c 581, a 586, c 695, a 700 

Farrell, Rose c 32, a 43, c 172, a 174, c 312 

Foley, Catherine a 297, c 307 

Franey, John J. a 400, c 405 

Feeney, Peter c 652, a 663 

Fogg, Emily W. a 676, c 692 

Garfield, D. L. c 152, a 156, c 274, a 276 

Gardner, John a 155, c 160 

Goggins, Margaret a 93, c 99 
. Grose, Joseph R. a 486, c 487, 504 

Grogan, Richard a 543, c 54S, a 650, c 652 

Hatch, Horace N. c 120, a 125 

Haynes, Ellen a 174, c 181 

Hinckley, Jane E. a 213, c 220 

Holmes, Eliza A. a 258, c 268, a 352, c 354 

Biggins, L. H. c 295, a 347, c 349 

Hathorne, J. H. a 587, c 601 

Harvey, Mary c 671, a 676 

Jelly, Edward c 32, a 43 

Joy, George M. c 476, a 480 

King, George M. a 26, c 31 

Kearns, John a 64, c 66 

Kelley, Maria O. F. a 109, c 120 

Kelley, Patrick a 109, c 120, a 574, c 576 

Kennard, Charles E. a P<9, c 120 

Keyes, Thomas a 414, c 418 

Kerrigan, Bernard a 533, c 536, a 574, c 576 

Kelley, John a 551, c 559 

Langford, George A. a 109, c 120, a 246. c 249 

Lally, Thomas a 155, c 160, a 264, c 268 

Lothrop, Harriet J. a 276, c 283 

Lightbody, Sarah E. c 421, a 426 

Lane, John a4ti5, c 475 

Lang, Mary a 663, c 670 

Mahoney, Mary a 189, c 200, a 280, c 283 

Meaney, Edward b\ a 189, c 200, a 315 

Murray, Catherine c 32, a 43 

Mulready, Christopher a 209, c 220 



XVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Maloney, Margaret a 276, c 283, a 3S8, c 390 

Maloney, Mary c 295 

Murphy, Julia a 43, c 49 

Murphy, Catherine a 485, 515, c 528, a 533, c 53G, a 629, c 635 

McCarthy, John c 274, a 277, c 410, a 415 

McDonald, Sarah K. a 3S3,c ! 

Mclntire, Edward a 189, o 200, a 315 

McCarty, John c 475, a 

McCullough, Elizabeth a 603, c 670 

McNiven, Mary Ann c 671, a 676 

Nile*, Mary if. a 209, <■ 220, a 352, c 354 

Noonan.Marj a 174, c 181 , a 280, c 288 

Nuremberg, Pauline c 57, a 59 

Nicholson, Emily E. a 663. c 670 

Nevins, .lolm .1. c 894, a 700 

O'Brien, Aim a 100, c 120, a 246, e 249 

O'Donnell, Hugh a 109, e 120, a 335, c 337 

O'Keefe, Maggie a 629, c 635 

Pearce, Deborah B. c 57, a 59 

PUsbury, Samuel a loo, c 120, a 264, c 268 

Powell, Michael <■ 322 

Pratt,.). E. c 346, a 500, c 502 

Purcell, Michael a 425, r 436 

Pember, Stephen a 499, c 602 

Prescott, Edwin R, a 618, c 621 

Quinn, John a 400, c 405, a 515, c 523 

Raleigh, Edward <: 120, a 125 

Ramsell, Edwin I-', a 568, c 576 

Safford, James 0. & Co. a 13, c 16, a 96 

Shea, Mary a 18, c 16 

Sullivan, Kate a 26, c 31 

Smith, James 1!. c 106, a 110 

Smith, J. C. i- 812, a 314 

Smith, J. M. c 12n, a 125 

Sim, Agnes 1). a 189. c 200 

Slack, Walter S. a 1S9, c 200 

Stevens, Caroline a 109, c 120, a 352, c 354 

ens, Eliza J. a 109, c 120 
Byrnes, Agnes c 16 >, 537, a 543 
Sullivan, M illiam .1. «• 566, a 568, 614 
Mate* , li. K e 601',, a 01.3 
Shea, James I!, a 029, e 035 
Thomas, Richard c 120. a 125, c 295, a 297 
Trace,) . .Mary Ann a 139, c 146, a 352, c 354 
Tighe, John a 568, c 570 
, Bridget a 586. c 601 

Wade, .lames 11. c 120, a 125 

Ward, Isaac N. a 93, c 99 

Williams, Andrew a 280, C 288 

Wilson, Andrew 1>. a 270, c 288, a 327, c 337, a 429, c 43G, a 551, 

c 559, a 050, c 652 
Withereli, Melinda O. a 93, c 99, a 388, c 390 
Worthington, Roland a 327, c 337 
Worthington, Roland, jr. a 3i7, c 337 
Claflin, Arthur 15.— 

Beacon sr. near Boston & Albany Railroad, injuries to horse, 
petition a 211, c 249 
Claflin, William — 

58 West Cedar st. (ward 9), stable, petition a 314; report 547 
Clapp, David, et nl. — 

Corner 1 and Cold sts., lamp, petition a518 
Clapp, J. Gardner, et al. — 

Extra force of night police, petition a 13, c 16; leave to with- 
draw a 112, c 120 
Clapp, Hiram, et <il. — 

Hamlets', (ward 20;, lamps, petition a 543 
Clapp, Horace I!., councilman (ward 24) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on fuel c 11 ; Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove 
cemeteries 11 
Clapp, Howard, councilman (ward 14) — 
Oaths of office I 

Appointed : committee on public buildings c 11 
Remarks : 

Superintendents of bridges 148 
Appropriation bill 185 
Repairs on the council chamber 476 
South End branch librai 
Clarence street — 

Edge8toces, sidewalks, petition a 124: order passed 281 

Petition a 443 
Sidewalks : No. 15, petition a 499 
Clarendon street — 

Triangular lot on Tremont and Montgomery sts., order referred, 

c 250, a 258 
Sidewalks : petition a 456 ; order passed 467 
Clark, Charles H — 

Elected s< cond assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Clark. Daniel- 
Sprinkling streets in Dorchester, petition a 209, c 217 
Clark, Daniel \V.— 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 590, c 601 
Clark, John T.— 

Pleasant st. ( Dorchester), macadamizing, petition a 400 
Clark, Lemuel, et al. — 

Telegraph St., sidewalk, petition a 209 



(Mark, Malachi— 

Sprinkling city streets, petition a 139 
Clark, W. It. et al .— 

Coleman st. (Dorchester), sewer, petition a 456 
Clay , Henry, it al. — 

Neponset av., petition to put in order a 59 
Clay street — 

No. 89, purchase of estate c 532, a 533, 558, c 559 
Cleaves, Joshua- 
Appointed inspector of petroleum and coal oils a 125 
(leaves, n. Porter — 

Appointed inspector of petroleum and coal oils a 125 
Clerk of committees — see Committees 
Clerk of common council — see Common council 
Cleve, Joseph— 

40 Blue Hill av., sidewalks, petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
Clifford street- 
Sidewalks : at 62, petition a 365 ; order passed 388 
At 54, petition a 3^3 : order passed |04 
At 5S, petition a 3So ; order passed 404 
At 20 & 22, petition a 413 ; order passed 447 
Clinton street — 

Paving : petition a 314 : order passed 367 
Crosswalk : petition a 413 
Clocks — see Fire department 
C lough, George A. — 

Nominated and elected city architect c 87 
Cluse, Thomas K. — 

Lincoln st. personal injuries, petition a 663, c 670 
Coal — 

Weighers appointed a 59, 83, 109, 155, 189, 209, 213, 297, 365, 
400, 499, 663 
Coalman, Anne — 

Geneva av. extension from Columbia St. to Warren st. via 
MarStOD av., damages 353 
Cobb, Cyrus — 

Banner sign in front of Studio building, petition a 209 
Cobleigh, C. C. — 

U'illard place (ward 25), stable, petition a 568 ; report 690 
Coburn, Joseph I). — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Codman, Robert and James C. Melvin, trustees, — and Edmund 
Quincy and Henry P. Quincy, trustees — 
Mercantile st. extension, S33000 damages a 46, 94 
Codman park — 

Abatement of edgestone assessment a 174, 217 
Coe, Henry K., councilman (ward 23) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on joint rules and orders c 3, 542; rules 
and orders of common council 3 ; public instruction 11 ; 
public library 11 ; topics in mayor's address 12: harbor 
defences 52 
Elected : finance committee c 7, chairman 18 
Remarks : 

Joint rules and orders 10 

Expenditures for schools 19 

Powers of school committee 19 

Pay of laborers 21, 412 

Topics in mayor's address 40 

Contract s\ stem 40 

Harbor defences 50 

Extension of D street 58 

Public library 66 

Thirteenth joint rule 75 

Notices of committee meetings 99 

Member of board of health 131 

Superintendent of public lands 136 

Mode of electing assessors 137 

Salaries of city officers 149 

badges 153 

Extension Of Broadway 167 

Investigation of death of Joseph Kenney 171 

Appropriation bill 182, 5 

of hydrants 207,648,662 
nd assistant assessors 207 

Death of councilman Joseph Healy 219 

Eli 234 

Public parks 237, 460, 491, 509, 524 

Question of privilege 249 

Printing four volumes of ancient records 250 

South-end branch library 251, 273, 323, 341, 622, 638 

Eva-ion of taxes 271 

Stony brook 272,287 

Trustees of City hospital 274 

New court house 274, 311 

Chai lestown almshouse 286 

Committee on park- 

I 6 of council chamber 322 

Decoration da; 

Barrel wagons 359 

New main from Chestnut Hill reservoir 370 

Law Department 381 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 396, 419 

Accounts of late treasurer of Brighton 405 

Drinking fountains 418 

lire alarms 419 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XVII 



250th anniversary 436, 438, 475, 478 
Assistance for clerk of committees 479 
Back bay improvements 502 
Tax titles 537 

Increase of police force 561 
Management of police department 566, 576 
Visitors to City hospital on Sundays 584 
Limitiug municipal expenditures 692 
Location of steam fire engine.No 12 692 
Coffin, G. Winthrop— 

Glen road (ward 23), stable, petition a 209 ; permit a 216 
Coffin, Uriah H.— 

256 Commonwealth av., sidewalk, petition a 230 ; order passed 
a 248 
Cogan, William F. el al. — 

East Fifth St., 125 ft. from St., sewer, petition a 468 
Colby place (ward 20) — 

Street lamp : petition a 480 
Coleman, George A. — 

Passenger wagon from Bowdoin sq. to Litchfield's wharf, peti- 
tion a 139 ; permit a 176 
Coleman, Thomas, ,lr. — 

Appointed weigher of coal a 189 
Coleman street (Dorchester)— 

Sewer : petition a 456 
Collector's Department — 

Annual report, c 274, a 277, 387, c 390 
Collins, .lames — 

154-158 Beach st. excavating cellar, report a 589 
Collins, Michael D. — 

Elected first assistant assessor, c. 121, a 124 
Collins, Patrick- 
Oakland st. (ward 24) stable, petition a 59 ; permit a 84 
Collins, P. A. etal.— 

Petition for use of Faneuil Hall a 15 
Collins, P. A.— 

South St., widening, SS11400 damages a 265 
Essex St., extension, $5400 damages a 265 
Collins, Stephen — 

Stoughton st., sidewalk, petition a 443 ; order passed a 458 
Colson, Melvin V. — 

Kennard av., sewer $5.14 abatement a 212 
Columbia street — 

Edgestones : petition a 349 ; order passed 367 
Columbia street (ward 24) — 

Petition to allow coasting a 13 

Relocation between Washington st. and Blue Hill av. : dam- 
ages a 46, 63, 352,429 
Near Seaver St., erection of wooden building a 59, c 66, a 94, 

c 99, 106 
Permission to occupy sidewalk a 145 
Grading, macadamizing, edgestones, gutters a 217 
Sidewalks : corner New Seaver St., petition a 314 ; order passed 
367 
Petition a 276 ; order passed 317 
Lamps : petition a 365 

Stable : petition a 543 ; leave to withdraw 590 
Crossing : junction with Bellevue and Glendale sts., petition a 586 
Columbus avenue — 

Claims : loss of horses a 26, c 31 

Bill board a 43, c 49, 57, a 59, 85, c 86 

Telegraph pole a 77 

Land : junction of Eliot and Pleasant sts., sale authorized a 85, 

c9y 
Standpipe : near junction with Worcester St., petition a 209 
South Boston R. Co., 12 cars per hour a 217 
Crosswalk : Boston & Providence K. Co., petition a 213 ; report 

a 248 
Asphalt pavement a 336 
Bridge repairs a 403 

Stepping stone, hitching post : Nos. 279 and 281, petition a 456 
Sidewalks : petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
Col well, William- 
Chestnut hill av. (ward 25), stable, petition a 499 ; permit 515 
Comfrey, James — 

South st. court, injuries to son, petition a 456, c 460 
Comins, George A. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Commercial Manufacturing Co. — 

North Beacon st. (ward 25), steam engine, petition and order 
notice a 480 ; permit 534 
Commercial street — 

Estate of Francis Raynes, damages, modification of order to pay 

a 28 
Widening: damages a 46, 63, 84,97, 111, 127,197,246,366,388, 

415, 520, 063 ; payment to sewer department 683 
Union Freight Railroad Co., relocation of tracks, petitions a 26, 

124 ; order passed a 535 
Wooden buildings: movement from 466-469 to 458-460 a 109, 

127 ; from 450 Commercial to 7 Henchman, a 297 
Steam engine : at No. 377, petition and order of notice a 175; 

hearing a 213 ; permit a 246 
At Nos. 291 and 293, petition and order for hearing a 468; 

hearing 514 ; permit 519 
Grading and paving ; from Eastern av. to Causeway St., orders 
passed a 217, 2sl, c 283, 307' 



Sewer : between Prince and Hanover sts., petition a 365 ; order 

for hearing 387 ; hearing 400 ; order passed 415 
Sprinkling : petition a 383 
Between south and north ferries, petition a 501 
Claims : corner Foster st., personal injuries, petition a 551, c 559 
Tracks : Causeway st. to Atlantic av., permit a 618 
Commercial street (ward 2-1 ) — 

From Hancock to Pleasant st. petition to put in order a 109 
Stables : C. M. Bugbee, petition a 139 
Neil McNeil, petition a 139, permit a 176 
Sprinkling : petitions a 209, 213 

" Portion," order passed a 248 
Sewer : between Shamrock and Linden sts., order passed a 350 
Obstructions : order referred c 462, a 465 
Committees — see also alphabetic heads 

Notices of committee meetings a 96, c 99, a 110, c 121, a 125 
Evening hearings for laborers c 628, a 629 
Contingent fund a 663, c 670 
Clerk of committees — 

William H. Lee nominated and elected a 64, c 87 

James L. llillard appointed assistant a 189, c 200 

Clerical assistance c 479, a 480 
Common and public grounds- 
Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 
Petition of John Reardon a 26,64, c 67, a 84, 93, c 99,171, 

a 174 
Maverick square c 138, a 139, 265, c 268 
Square at Meeting-house Hill a 199, c 200, 229, 240, a 244, 

c 249 ; named Eaton square c 295, a 297, 316 
Madison square c 207, a 211, 265, c 268 
Orchard park a 209, 212, c 220, a 265 
Superintendent authorized to purchase gravel employ men, etc. 

a 214, c 220, 232 
$1200 to superintendent for use of greenhouse a 214, c 220, 232 
Free concerts c 229. 233, a 243 
West church square c 240, a 243 
Adornment of private grounds a 247, c 249 
Vandalism on the public, garden c 256, a 258 
Square, on Tremont, Clarendon, and Montgomery sts. c 172, 

a 174, c 255, a 258 
Winthrop square, Charlestown a 265, c 268 
Removing fences enclosing public grounds a 265, c 268, a 276, 

300, c 319 
Play-grounds c 274, a 277, c 295, a 297, c 322, 346, a 365, c 370 
Seats on public grounds c 325, a 329, c 864, a 365, c 379, a 383 
Triangular lot between Rockland street and Chestnut Hill av. 

c 32, 346, 356, a 365, 574, c 576 
Police commissioners requested to protect public grounds 

a 367, c 370 
The" Young Elm " c 532 

David W. Sheehan, pay for services a 59, c 66, a 84, c 86 
William Doogue nominated supt. a 64, c 87 ; elected a 94, c 100, 

alio 
Claims : personal injuries a 109, c 120, 475, a 480 
Institute of Technology and Natural History Society, care and 

adornment of grounds, petition a 174, c 181 
Prescott sq., petition that it be laid out as public park a 241, 

c249; report a 265, c 268 
Lewis park, flagstaff, report a 276, c 283, 421 
Monument at Fort Lot, Highlands, petition c 322; reference to 

water board c 316, a 349 
Park and playground, Brighton av., Malvern and Garden sts., 

petition c 322 
Sunday afternoon concerts : remonstrances a 383, 388, c 390, 

405 
Public garden pond: skating, order passed c 41, 57, a 59, 
c 606, a 613 

Boats, petition of Julia Paget a 93, c 99 

Petition that boats may be used on Suudays c 396, a 400 

Unruly boys a 614 
Triangular lot on Dartmouth and Boylston sts, petition a 518, 

c523 
Highland park: purchase of property of St. Elizabeth's hospi- 
tal a 547, c 548, a 551, 554, c 559, c 565, a 575, 590, c 6ul, 

618, 670, a 691, c 694, a 700 
Dumping snow on public grounds c 626, a 629 
Skating place in Chester sq. c 652, a 663 
Daniel Dugan, deceased, pay for services c 674, a 676 
Common council — 
Organization 1 
Oaths of office signed 2 
Washington P. (iregg elected clerk 3 
Notice of organization of board of aldermen 3 
Regular meetings, Thursdays, 7.30 P.M. assigned 4 
Resolution of sympathy with mayor in bereavement 4 
Selection of seats 4 
Contingent fund 10 
Portraits of presidents c 138, 147 
Special meetings 218, 43d, 450, 467 
Lunch for late session c 173, 225 
Use of ante-room allowed to deputy collectors c 1S8 
Death of councilman Joseph Healey c 218, 228, a 230 
Use of council chamber allowed to assessors c 226 
Use of council chamber refused c 322 
Excursion to Sudbury river c 317, 356, 304, 380 
Use of council chamber allowed to board of aldermen c 410 



XVIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Visit to Mystic water works, 423 
Annual dinner 652, 696 

Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 66" 
Time of final meeting 074 

Powers of common council in location of departments c 695 
The closing proceedings 696 
Common street — 

Middlesex Railroad Co., tracks a 43, 198 
Sprinkling : from Hereford St. to West Chester park a 199 
Commonwealth avenue — 

Extension, agreement with abutters and contract for filling 

authorized a 28, c 31, 54, 73 
Sidewalks : No. 25G, petition a 230 ; order passed a 248 
No. 1 19, petition a 230 ; order passed a 248 
Nos. 258 and 200, petition n 241 
No. 182, petition ;i 241 
No. 327, petition a 413 ; order passed 447 
No. 202, petition a 443 ; order passed 458 
No. 238, petition a 456 ; order passed 407 
No. 165, petition a 480 ; order passed 500 
No. 246, petition a 543 ; order passed 574 
Telephone poles : petition a 327 ; report and order of notice 
i!67 ; remonstrances, hearing postponed 400, 426 ; leave to 
withdraw 457 
Plank walk : between Chester park and Hereford St., petition a 

518 ; order passed 574 
Stable : No 120, petition a 676 ; leave to withdraw 701 
Bridge over park water-way, contract authorized c 695, a 700 
Commonwealth hats. Fort Point channel (ward 13)— 

Wooden building : erection, petition c 475, a 480 ; permit c 526, 
a 533 
Oonant George W.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
Conant street — 

Grading, edgestones near Bumstead lane, petition a 276; order 
passed 558 
Concord street — 

Passige-way leading to Rutland St., removal of tree, petition a 
450 ; leave to withdraw 534 
Condor street (ward 1; — 

trie : No. 87, petition a 480 ; leave to withdraw 688 
Congdon, Louis — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Congregational Club — 

Petition for use of Faneuil hall a 174 
Congress street — 

Damages c 120, a 125 

Name of Eastern av. changed to Congress st. a 401 
Middlesex U.K. Co. additional cars, petition a 649 
Congress square — 

Paving : petition a 468 
Conlan, James M. — 

24, 26, 28 Vale st., edgestones, petition a 425; order passed 447 
Conley, Bridget — 

Commercial st., laying out, and altering grade of Henchman 
St., $1100 damages a SI 
Conley, John J. — 

Appointed deputy sealer of weights and measures a 365 
Connelley, John— 

134 West Ninth St., edgestone and sidewalk abatement, petition 
a 213 
Connertou, Kllen — 

70 Broadway, personal injuries, petition a 629, c 635 
Connolly, B. J.— 

Corner Hingham and Middlesex sts., sidewalk, petition a 241 
Connolly, John — 

127 Vernon st., trees, petition a 258 
Connolly, Maggie- 
Sum due Patrick Mulcarron, deceased c 455, a 457 
Connolly, Martin J. — 

122 Vernon st., tiees, petition a 230 ; order passed a 280 
Connor, Mrs. C. A. — 

White av.. Centre and Orchard sts., sewer, a 467, 468 
Connor, David — 

Merrimac St., personal injuries, petition a 327, c 337 ; leave to 
withdraw a 3S8, c 390 
Connor, Michael — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Geneva av. extension, $360 damages a 466 
Conroy, Henry — 

19 Weston St., stable, petition a 456 ; permit 472 
Constables — 

James M. Walsh, bond, petition for release as surety a 13; 

report 47 
W. 11. Warren, surety on bond of, petition for release a 349, 

630 
Bonds approved : a 46, 62, 94, 111, 126, 230,245, 415,465, 468, 

483, 485, 499, 514, 519, 533, 545, 554, 607 
Number of constables a 415, 472 
Investigation of complaints a 600 
Notice of unfiled bonds referred a 533 
Appointments — 

Adams, Francis M. 456 
Andrews, Richard F. 481 
Badlam. Wm. H. 456 
Barry, John R. 456 



Barry, Patrick 456 
Blossom, Wm. A. 456 

Brackett, Samuel 456 

Brown, Moses P. 456 

Bulfinch, Francis V. 456 

Burcham, Charles 456 

Butler, John E. 456 

Baxter, Francis J. 481 

Carter, Wm. E. S. 258 

Calming Samuel, jr. 456 

Coburn, Joseph D. 466 

Conant, Geo. W.456 

Cook, Charles P. 481 

Cook, Win. P. 456 

Copeland, W. M. H.456 

Crawford, Thomas A. 456 

Curtis, Daniel B. 456 

Derby, Isaac W. 456 

Doherty, John F. 456 

Duddy, John A. 456 

Damrell, John E. S. 481 

Darling, Hinds R. 481 

Dearborn, Albion P. 481 

Drew, Alvin S. 481 

Drew, George G. 481 

Duggan, John A. 481 

Fitzpatrick, John B. 456 

Fclger, Thomas 450 

Forristall, Henry M. 456 

Fort, Win. A. 456 

Francy, John J. 456 

F'arr, George W. 481 

Fee, Thomas, jr. 481 

Foss, Elijah D. 499 

Goodwin, .lames F. 456 

Gorman, Dennis J, 456 

Grant, Augustus 150 

Gardner, William T. 481 

Hall, Thomas 456 

Ilebard, Sylvester H. 456 

Hicks, \\ in. L. 456 

Hovey, Solomon, jr. 456 

Hatching, Luther 456 

Harrington, John C. 481 

llerter, Robert 481 

Hodgate, John M. 481 

Ingalls, Frederick P. 456 

Jones, William K. 481 

Johnson, Charles P. 591 

Keith David B. 400, 481 

Kail man, Marcus 481 

Kellev, Stephen P. 481 

Kendall, John Y. 481 : displaced 591 

Knapp, Frederick P. 481 

Knapp, Russell R. 481 

Lynch, Nicholas G. 481 

McCorry, J. Stuart 456 

Macdonald, Francis X. 456 

Martin, William D. 456 

Mcintosh, William H. 456 

Mcrriam, Benjamin 456 

Munroe, Abel B. 456 

Monroe. George B. 456 

McDonald, Isaac W. 481 

Monroe, Jotham E. 481 

Nounan, Daniel 97, 456 

Nettleton, Aaron F. 456 

Newell, John 456 

O'Brien, John 13. 456 

Patterson, David 456 

Peters, Alvah II. 450 

Post, William S. 456 

Prentiss, Henry 456 

Priest, .). Edward 456 

Paine, Isaiah, jr. 481 

Proctor, George B. 481 

Rice, Augustus M. i 

Robie John 456 

Rogers, John 456 

Rowc, Joseph R. 481 

Royce, Burnham 481 

Smith, Charles 456 

Smith, Thomas M. 456 

Spud), Henry F. 456 

Spinney, Edwin B. 456 

Sullivan, Denis A. 456 

Smyth, Edwin R. 481 

Sherman, Samuel S. 481 (reconsideration and rejection 485) 

Simmons, Simon 481 

Smith, Austin R. 4S1 

Southworth, Asa 481 

Sullivan, Barry 481 

Sweeney, Christopher F. 481 

Swift, William II. 481 

Tuckerman, George N. 83 

Travers, Patrick 109 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XIX 



Tyler, William G. 456 
Wolffsohn, Siegfried 83, 481 
Wallis, Elbridge G. 456 
Wilson, George L. 456 
Wright, Warren A. 456 
Wyinan, Abraham G. 456 
Walsh, Morris J. 481 
Ware, Frank T. 481 
Whiteside, John II. 481 
Williams, Wright W. 481 
Consumptive's home, trustees — 

Blue hill av., relocation, $791 damages a 265, 352 
Conthouy, William A. — 

Wilmont St., edgestones, petition a 468 ; order passed 500 
Contracts — 

Ordinance repealing ordinance c 674, a 677, c 692 
Cook & Handy — 

Sprinkling streets in Roxbury district, petition a 174 
Cook, Charles P. 

Appointed constable a 481 
Cook, Coieman — 

71 Trenton St., stable, petition a 465 ; permit 472 
Cook, Florrin and wife 

Hallock St., grade damages, petition a 551 
Cook, James F. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Cook, John C. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Cook, 0. D.— 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Federal st. bridge a 388 
Cook, William P.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
Cooke, Henry A. et al.— 

West Canton St., sewer, petition a 230 ; order passed 335 
Coolidge, A. R. et al. — 

Clinton St., crosswalk, petition a 413 
Cooper street (ward 7) — 
Paving: petition a 425 

Between Charlestown st. and Stillman pi., petition a 425 ; 
order passed 447 
Copeland, C. F. etal. — 

Dudley St., between Blue hill av. and Brook av., sprinkling, 
petition a 213 
Copeland, W. M. II.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
Corbett, Annie 

Newman st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 365 ; order passed 
404 
Corcoran, James, heirs of — 

Washington St., relocation, $67.50 damages a 97 
Cordeiro, M. C. B.— 

Portrait of rear-admiral John A. Winslow, petition for purchase 
a 95, 145, c 146, 166, a 177, c 181, 201 
Corey street (ward 23) — 

Stable : petition a 480 ; permit 500 
Costello, M. W. et al.— 

Station St., grading etc., petition a 349 
Costello, William P.— 

Appointed undertaker a 327 
Cottage street — 

Watering : petition a 230 

Crosswalk: at intersection of West Cottage and Dudley sts., 
petition a 480 : report 500 
Cotting, Charles U. et al. — 

Newbury St., grading, etc. petition a 480 
Cottle, Henry W.— 

'Change av., Merchant's hotel, projection of lantern, petition 
a 97, c 99 ; permit a 112 
Cotton, Charles H. — 

173 Blue hill av., edgestones, petition a 514; order passed 521 
Cotton, Robert — 

Appointed public weigher a 213 
County of Suffolk — 

Constables — see Constables 
County accounts, standing committee a 12 

New court-house : committee a 15 ; order relating to rights and 
duties of common council c 22, 25; report 106, 122; order 
to petition for authority to take land a 30; indefinitely 
postponed a 44 ; topic in mayor's address referred e 39, a 44 ; 
order to protest against commission to take land and for 
authority to take laud by city council c 41; indefinitely 
postponed a 44; petition of Henry W. Paine et al. referred 
a 15; report a 44; resolves and order in opposition to com- 
mission, and order to apply for act authorizing county 
commissioners to take land a 44; order passed for judiciary 
committee to ask for act authorizing city council to take 
land c 107, 108; committee on topic in mayor's address re- 
quested to report expedient action a 175; report, recom- 
mitted a 261; resolve in opposition to Pemberton sq. site, 
c 274, 292; substitute orders passed c 292; indefinitely 
postponed a 298; resolves passed c 309 ; indefinitely post- 
poned a 691; remonstrance from members of Suffolk bar 
referred a 314 ; report in favor of Pemberton sq. site a 587 ; 
substitute order to take reservoir lot, etc. 588; discussion 
a 591 ; amended order passed a 607 ; order to petition for 
authority to incur county debt a 611, 613; indefinitely 



postponed c 621; order to petition for contribution from 
other counties a 611, 613; indefinitely postponed c 621; order 
to remodel court-house a 611; referred to next board of 
aldermen a 613 

Public records : topic in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 

Probation officer : report a 48; horse and vehicle a 484 

Jurors drawn a 43, 59, 109, 124, 155, 174, 213, 241, 258,314,349, 
365, 413, 443, 456, 468,480, 499, 533, 543, 551, 591, 663 

Summoning of jurors, petition alleging fraud a 64; report, 
leave to withdraw a 112 

Clerk of municipal court (S.B.), appropriation for clerk-hire, 
petition a 174, c 181 

Judge of Roxbury municipal court, bill for examination of in- 
sane persons, petition a 349 ; leave to withdraw 429 

Repairs and furniture for county buildings authorized a 48 

Social law library a 26, 47, 568, 587 

Medical examiner, telephonic service a 64 

Clerk-hire in the courts a 64, 116, 198, 246. 317, 335, 388, 429, 
458, 500, 546, 630, 700 

Jury list a 143, 180 

Suffolk deeds, printing first volume a 176, 211 

Index of attachments a 265, 366, 631 

Semi-annual report of houses of detention a 386, 700 
Court street — 

Coaches a 59, 94 

Claims : personal injuries c 120, a 125, 663, c 670 
Cousens, John E. — 

Appointed weigher of coal, inspector of hay and straw, meas- 
urer of wood and bark a 400 
Couthouy, W. A. et al. — 

Wilmont St., lamps, petition a 468 
Couthouy, W. A.— 

Elmore st. corner Wilmont st. (ward 21), stable, petition a 551 ; 
permit 574 
Covington, Leonard — 

Virginia av. (ward 20), stable, petition a 365; permit 388 
Cowdry E. T. & Co.— 

Wells St., steam pipe, petition a 425 
Crawford street — 

Petition to put in order a 97 

Grading : from Warren St. to Walnut av., order passed a 281 

Sewer : petition a 468 ; report 500 
Cross street- 
Paving: between Haymarket sq. and Hanover St., petition 
a 443 
Culvert street — 

Macadamizing, gutters, sidewalks a 155 

Crosswalk : junction of Cabot St., report a 248 
Culvert place — 

Stable: petition a 366; permit 3S8; remonstrance 414; condi- 
tional permit 429 
Cumberland street — 

Grading a 47, c 49, 71 
Cumston place — 

Edgestones, sidewalks: petition a 480 ; order passed 500 
Curtis street, E. B. — 

Moving wooden buildings to corner Pope St., petition a 468 

Stable: corner Pope St., petition a 514; permit 534 
Curve street — 

Between Hudson and Tyler sts., roadway and southerly side- 
walk closed a 483, 650 
Crawford, Thomas A. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Creed, Ellen E. — 

194 West Ninth st. (8.B.) abatement of sidewalk assessment, 
petition a 124 ; order passed a 145 
Crocker, Samuel R., heirs of — 

Linden st. (Brighton), sewer, $32.67 abatement a 472 
Crocker, Uriel II. et al.— 

Province st., grading, paving, petition a 443 
Crockett, Edwin L. — 

East Boston (south) ferry (E.B.) damages, petition a 209, c 220 
Crockett, William D.— 

50 Dale st. (Roxbury), sidewalk, petition a 456; order passed 467 
Cronin, Catheriue — 

Hanover St., personal injuries, petition c 18, a 26; leave to 
withdraw c J37 
Cronin, Patrick II. councilman (ward 12) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee ou paving c 11 

Remarks : 

Second assistant assessors 208 
Crosby, Bernard — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Crosby, Florence W. administratrix — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall No. 60 a 128 
Crosby, Frederick — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall No. 60 a 128 
Crosby, Patrick etal. — 

Keyes St., grading etc., petition a 43 
Cross, D. G. et al. — 

Nuisance on South bay c 172, a 174, c 324, a 329, 4^2, c 405, 
a 415, c 419, 479, a 480 
Cross, II. B. et al. — 

Seaverns av., grading, gravelling, petition a 26 

Macadamizing etc., petition a 93 ; order passed 403 



XX 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Crowley, Dennis — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Crowley, John C. — 

Elected meuibei of school committee a 065 
Cruft, Isaac S — 

Greenville st., alteration of boundary line of land, petition 
a 189, c 146 ; leave to withdraw a 198, c 200 
Cudworth, S. S.— 

East Chester park, petition that it be put in order a 241 
Cumings, Charles I!, etal.— 

Qreenongh av., sidewalks, petition a 514 
Cummings, Sally C. — 

Commercial st., widening, and estate in Ilolden court, $397 
damages a 63 

Cundy, William II.— 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Cunnill, Michael M. et lit.— 

Walthani st., between Washington st. and Harrison av., side- 
walks, gutters, etc., petition a 139 
Cunningham, S. 1!. — 

134 West Fourth st., stable, petition a 443 ; leave to withdraw 
701 
Cunningham, Thomas — 

Appointe 1 field-driver and pound-keeper a 114, c 222 
Cunningham, Thomas et at. — 

Chcl-ea and Henley sts., paving, petition a 93 
Curran, Ellen — 

Claims: personal injuries, petition o 864, a 866; leave to with- 
draw c 410, a 415 
Currier & Sanders- 
Sullivan sip to Litchfield's wharf, passenger wagon, petition 
5 ; leave to withdraw : >T 

Hancock s<|. (Chariestown) to harbor boats, passenger wagon, 
petition a 400; permit 415 
Curtis, Adoniram — 

Sprinkling city streets, petition a 155 ; permit a 179 
Curtis. Daniel B, — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Curtis, Franklin it ill. — 

Warren st., from Copeland to Rockland sts., crossing, petition 
a 688 
Curtis, Qeorge — 

Prevention of injury to wharf on Hoxbury canal, petition a 93, 
c99 
Curtis, Qeorge et at. — 

Harbor master for Roxbury canal, petition a 96; leave to with- 
drs 283 

Curtis, Nelson — 

Waldeu and Heath sts., sewer, petition a 543 
Cashing. A. R. ft al.— 

Temple pi., crosswalk, petition a 139; permit a 159 
Cushing, Benjamin— 

Non. H .H i assessor c 92 : elected a 93, c 99 
Cushing, Ernest IV. — 

Newbnrj St., near 168, plank walk, petition a 514 
Cushing & Bail el al.— 

First st.. at C st., crossing, petition a 607 
Cushing, Nathan et nl. — 

Richmond st., between Fulton and Commercial sts., paviDg, 
peti'iou a (56 ; order passed 407 
Cushing, T. F. — 

Newbury st. (ward 11), stable, petition a 213 

Newbury St.. grading, petition a 408 
Cutter, Abram F. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 

D Street- 
Extension across Old Colony railroad at grade : order to peti- 
tion foi- act referred C ">7, a 59 ; communication to mayor 
from president O.C.K. referred a 62, c 06 ; report from 
street commissioners that railroad commissioners refuse 
permit a 96, C '.19; order for street commissioners to confer 
with O.C.K. Co. referred c 173, a 175: notice of call for 
report C 347; report, further time allowed c 411, a 41.') ; 
call for report C 806! report referred c 625, a 629; report 
referred to finance committee of next city council c 040, 

Engine and boiler : No. 160, petition, order notice a 649; hear- 
ing 070 ; permit 688 
Dacev, Timothy .1. — 

Appointed trustee of City hospital a 213, c 222 
Dailey, Edward B. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Dakin, J. v. et nl. — 

Blakemore st., grading, petition a 400 
Dale street — 

Sidewalks : at No. 50, petition a 456; order passed 467 
At Nos. 62 and 54, petition a 533 
Dale avenue (Roxbury) — 

Lamps : petition a 499 
Daley, Bllen M. .).— 

208 Shawmnt av. personal injuries, petition c 694, a 700 
Dallas place — 

Trees : removal, petition a 109 
Dallenger, Frank W. — 

Appointed public weigher a 314 



Dairy mple, James T. — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Dalton, Charles II. — 

Appointed park commissioner c 322, a 329 
Daly, Thomas II. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Danirell, John E. S. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Damrell, John s. — 

Appointed inspector of buildings a 518, c 523 
Dana. Otis I). — 

Corner Broadway and M st., sidewalk, order passed a 248 
Daniels, Albert W. — 

Brighton av., damages, petition a 77, c 86; leave to withdraw 
a 246, c 24'.) 
D'Arcey & Atwood — 

East Boston, license to sprinkle streets, petition a 109; permit 
a 127 
Darling, Hinds R. — 

Appointed constable a 4^1 
Dartmouth street — 

Sidewalk : abatement a 124, 145 

Tracks : from Tremont to Marlborough sts. a 276 

Public library site : corner Boylston st. a 63, c 06, a 276, c 283, 
a 402, 414, 431, c 436 

Bridge repairs a 4o.'i 

Triangular lot : petition to lay out as public square a 518, 
c 523 
Davis, Adolphus S. — 

Nuisance in lower Mystic pond, petition c 548, a 554; report 
referred to water board c 624, a 029 
Davis. George II. — 

Sit. Washington av. bridge, election of superintendent, peti- 
tions in favor c 130, a 142; ballots c 149, a 156 
Davis, Qeorge II. — 

East Newton st., cancelling conditions upon land — see Stevens. 
Calvin 
Davis, II . II. etal — 

Capen, Evans, Nelson sts. (ward 24), lamps, petition a 56S 
Davis, Henry A. — 

Appointed superintendent of north scales a 189 
Davis, Horatio — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Davis, James G. — 

Fleeted overseer of poor a 175, e 1S2 
Davis, James M. — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 

Davis, J. Alba — 

Roekvtew st. (Jamaica Plain), grading, petition a 327 

Davis, Joseph P. — 

Nominated and elected citv engineer a 64, c87; resignation a 
111 ; accepted a 129, c 130 

Davis, Maria II. — 

Enfield st. (ward 23), stable, petition a 414; permit 429 
Enfield St., sewer, petition a 105; order for hearing 472; hear- 
ing 480; order passed 500 

Davis, Ormus C. — 

Edgeworth st., personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120 

Davis, 1'. T.— 

Onion sq. (ward 25), stable, petition a 533; permit 547 

Davis, Salome — 

Tremont St., sewer assessment a 98 

Davis, Thomas W. — 

Nominated and elected city surveyor a 64, c 87 

Davis, William F. — 

Nominated and elected water registrar a 64, c 87; bond ap- 
proved a 564 

Davis, W. II. et nl — 

pen, Evans, Nelson sts. (ward 24), lamps, petition a 365 

Day. Leonard- 
Third st. approval of houses, petition a 258, c 268; order passed 
c 307 
Maria L. — 
West Springfield st., personal injuries, petition c 120, a 125 

Day street Roxbury) 

Claims : damages a 327, c 337 

Dean, Charles A. — 

Elmore st. .and Walnut av., sewer, petition a 174 ; hearing 276 
Wilmont st. sewer, petition a 10'.); order of notice 144; hearing 

; order passed 300 
Wilmont St., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 425 ; order passed 
447 

Dean, Charles- 
Appointed public weigher a 314 

Dean, Theodore — 

Howard st near Hampden st. (ward 20), stable, petition a 213 

Dearborn, Albion 1*. — 

Appointed constable a 481 

i u place — 
Trees : removal, order passed a 280 
Dearborn street- 
tones, gutters, sidewalks : around square at intersection 

of Albany and Mall sts., also on westerly side of Dearborn 

st.. order passed a 248 
Sidewalk : No. 61, order, passed a 248 
Telegraph poles a 534 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXI 



Dealing, W. II.— 

768 Washington St., transparency, petition a 543 
Deblois, Stephen G. etal. — 

Newbury St., telephone poles, remonstrance a 400 
Decker, Louisa — 

42 La Grange place, lantern, permit a 545 
Decoration Day — 

Thomas G. Stevenson, Post 26 G.A.R., invitation accepted, 

c 18, a 26 
Half-holiday to employes c 296, a 297 
Address of Hev. L. P. Townsend c 324 
Non-compliance with permission to parade c 325, a 329, c 346, 

a 349 
S200 to each post c 40, 55, a 59, 129 
Decoration of Army and Navy Monument, c 90, a 93, c 106 

a 110, c 136, a 139, c 146 
Post 113 G.A.R. invitation accepted a 143 
Post 92 G.A.R. invitation accepted a 245, c 249 
Dedham street — 

Sidewalk : corner Albany st., petition a 518; order passed 574 
Modification of deed, petition a 551, c 559; leave to withdraw 
a 614, c 621 
Deer Island — 

Claims : for personal injuries c 57, a 59 
Deering, Samuel — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222] 
Deighan, Peter — 

Petition for position of draw-tender a 443, c 454 
Delaney, Mary B. — 

Maverick sq., personal injuries, petition a 443, c 454 ; leave to 
withdraw a 546, c 548 
Demain, Mrs. Mary C. — 

Court st., personal inquiries, petition c 120, a 125 
Denney, Thomas J., councilman (ward 12) — ■ 
Oaths of office 3 

Appointed : committee on elections 4 ; Mt. Hope and Cedar 
Grove cemeteries 11 
Dennie, Charles H. — 

Nominated and elected city and county treasurer a 280, c 292 
Denon, Patrick M.— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Derby, Isaac W. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Deshon, O. F. et al. — 

Washington St., from Walkhill St. to Dedham line, gravelling, 
etc., petition a 26 
Dever, John F. — ■ 

Elected representative from 20th district of Suffolk county a 95 
Devereux, John N. — 

Appointed deputy sealer of weights and measures a 109 
Devereux & Meserve — 

Stable, petition a 43 ; permit a 65 
Devine, Honora — 

Sidewalk : corner C and Seventh sts., order passed a 317 
Devine, James, councilman (ward 20) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on salaries c 11 
Devine, James, el al. — 

Orchard park, sprinkling, petition a 241 
Devlin, Thomas II., councilman (ward 13) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on claims 11 ; common 11 
Remarks : 

Superintendent of bridges 148 
Appropriation bill 183 
Carson's excavating machine 200 
City forester's greenhouse 221 
Trustees of City hospital 273 
Charlestown almshouse 285 
Fourth of July music 347 
250th anniversary 462, 478 
Public parks 513, 532 
Devon street — 

Sewer: between Blue Hill av. and Warren St., petition a 425; 
order passed 446 
Devon street (ward 25) — 

Boston & Albany Railroad Co., wooden building, petition c 57, 

a 59 ; permit a 94, c 99, 106 
Corner Fourth St., wooden building, petition a 109, c 120; per- 
mit a 126, c 130 
Stable : B. & A. R. Co., petition a 93; permit a 112 
Devonshire street — 

Fire of Dec. 28-29, 1879, investigation c21, 40, a 43; report of 
inspector of buildings c 73, a 77; report of fire commission- 
ers c 151 
Middlesex K.R. Co. additional cars, petition a 649 
De Wolf, Mary— 

Tremont St., sewer assessment a 98 
De Wolf street- 
Grading, macadamizing, edgestones, gutters, petition a 365; 
order passed 467 
Dexter, S. P. et al.— 

Hancock st. (Dorchester), sidewalks, etc., petition a 59 
Increase of light in street lamps, petition a 59; report 665 
Columbia st. (ward 24), jtinctiou with Bellevue and Glendale 
sts., crossing, petition a 586 



Dexter, S. P.— 

Trull st. (ward 24), petition to put in order a 241 
Dickson, Marshall — ■ 

Corner Leverett and Brighton sts., injuries to himself and ve- 
hicle, petition a 586, c 601 
Dimond, E. J. — 

Taft's place (ward 23), stable, petition a 258; permit a 281 
Dix, John H. — 

Rear 347 Beacon st. stable, petition a 586 ; remonstrance 613 ; 
permit 688 
Dix street (ward 24) — 

Grading, edgestones, etc. : petition a 209 ; order passed 403 

Sewer: petition a 425; order notice 446; hearing 456; order 
passed 467 
Dixon, Edward, councilman (ward 6) — 

Qualified c 390 

Appointed : committee on ferries 412 
Doane street — 

Repairs, etc. : petition a 465 
Dodge, Frederic L. — 

Appointed public weigher a 139 
Dodge, George R. — 

Appointed public weigher, a 125 
Doe, Freeman J. and Charles H. Gass— 

F. H. market, lease of stalls and cellar a 467 
Doer, Joseph, et al. — 

Increase of light in street lamps, petition a 124; report 665 
Doggett, N. B.— 

Essex st. extension, land damages, petition a 533 
Doherty, Cornelius F., councilman (ward 2) — ■ 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on common 11 ; public lands 11 
Doherty, Daniel — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Doherty, Daniel, et al. — 

Causeway St., crosswalk, petition a 109 
Doherty, John, councilman (ward 7) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on harbor 11 ; health 11; new bridge to 
Charlestown 21 

Remarks : 

Appropriation bill 183 
Doherty, John F. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Doherty, James, et al. — 

Prevention of loading or discharging of vessels on the Sabbath, 
petition a 93; report inexpedient a 402, c 405 
Doherty, M. et al.— 

North st., paving, petition a 314 ; order passed 367 
Doherty, Michael- 
Petition for release as surety from bond a 349; report a 630 
Doherty, Patrick — 

Petition to be released as surety from bond a 13, 47 
Dolan, John — 

North Margin st. near Lafayette av., edgestones, petition a 327 
Dolan, Martin — 

Beacon St. near West Chester park, grade damages, petition 
a 480 
Dolan, William- 
Elected inspector-in-chief of lighters a 197, c 225 
Donahoe, Charles W., councilman (ward 15) 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on overseers of the poor 11 

Remarks : 

Extension of D st. 57 
Donahoe, Michael — 

Estate on Middlesex st., petition a 59, c66; a97, c 106 ; new 
agreement, etc. a 97, c 106 
Donahoe, Michael E.— 

Appointed undertaker a 413 
Donahoe, Timothy G. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Donaldson, William — 

91 Blue Hill av. (ward 21), stable, petition a 349; permit 367 

Woodbine st. (ward 21) , stable, petition a 443 ; permit 483 
Donehey, Maurice — 

Swan st. (S.B.) , personal injuries, petition c 476, a 480 
Donneilv, J. & Sons — 

Posting bills on fences, petition a 43, c49; leave to withdraw 
a 85, c 86 
Donovan, Daniel — 

Appointed weigher of coal a 213 
Donovan, John — 

Personal injuries at Deer island c 57, a 59; leave to withdraw 
c 106, a 110 
Doogue, William — 

Nominated superintendent of common and public grounds a 64; 
elected c 100, a 110 

$1200 for use of greenhouse, etc. a 214, c 220, 232 
Doolcv, Margaret— 

177 West Seventh st., sidewalks, petition a 499 
Dorchester avenue — 

Claims : injuries to person and carriage a 26, c 31. a 158, c 160 

Mechanics' National I'ank, removal of telegraph post a 30, 47 

Petition to put in order a 59 

Widening : damages a 197 



XXII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Sprinkling: from Swett st. to lit. Vernon st. a 109 

From Field's corner to dividing line between wards 24 and 

15 a 213 
" Portion,'' order passed a 248 
Wooden building: removal to Adams St., petition a 241 ; per- 
mit 483 
Edge.-tones : at .Milton Lower Mills 
Grading : between Washington and Codman sts. a 276 

At Milton bower Mills a 270 
Stables : near Greenwich st.. petition a 365; permit 415 

Petition a 518 ; permit 547 
Sidewalks: order passed a 3>i7 

Corner Victoria St., petition a 413; order passed 447 
Plank, request to restore c 40 
Trees: removal, petition a 425; order passed 534 

(Tear Victoria St., removal, petition a 551 ; report 587 
Crossing: at King st., petition a 518; report 534 
Telegraph poles : petition a 383 

Near Fuller St., petition a 518; permit 534 
Between Foundry and Adams sts., permit a 589 
Sewer : damages, petition a 460, c 475; leave to withdraw a 690, 
c692 
Dorchester Gas Light Co. — 

Contract authorised a 352 
Dorchester street — 

Watering : from Broadway to Eighth st., petition a 241 
Gutters, macadamising, order passed a 281 
Passengei wagon: corner Broadway to Oakland gardens, peti- 
tion a 314 
Church of St. Augustine: iron fence, petition a 258 
Boundary line adjusted a 606, c 670 
Clock, order passed a 557, c 558 
Dorchester Trust Funds — 

Annual report of treasurer c 274 
Dorr, Joseph, et al. — 

Kllery St. between Swett and lloston sts., grading macadamiz- 
ing, edgestones, petition a 230; order passed 317 
Dorr, Morris — 

Heiifrew st., edgestones, petition a 349 ; order passed 367 
Doughty, Royal M.— 

Appointed public weigher a 213 
Dove, Honors — 

Belmont st. ( Charlestown) , personal injuries, petition a 97, 
c 99 ; leave to withdraw a 546, c 548 
Dove, John — 

Appointed fence-viewer a 214, c 222 
Inquiry into acts of, petitiou a 327, c 337 
Dove, Maria — 

Quincy st. (Koxbur.v) edgestones, abatement, petition a 124; 
order passed a 179 
Dove street (S..U.) — 

Grade damages, order to pay a 29 
Stable : petitiou a 3S3 , permit 534 
Dove street — 

Abatement of sidewalk assessment a 213 

Grading, edgestones, gutters, gravelling, from Quincy st. to 

Blue Hill aw, order passed a 281 
Dover street- 
South Boston Railroad Co., increase of cars a 155, 217, 630 

Stable : petition a 827 : permit 402 

Telegraph poles : a 535, 589 
Dow, .lames, et al. — 

Norfolk street, grading, etc., petition a 26 
Dow, Moses A. — 

Charlestown almshouse, remonstrance against abandonment 
c 73, a 77 
Dow, Moses A. et ul. — 

How st (Charlestown), paving, petition a 443 
Dowd, Peter A. (or person or persons unknown) — 

Beverly street, ordered to renew telegraph poles a 85 
Downer. Samuel, et al. — 

Dorchester av., petition to put in order a 59 

Commercial Bt , petition to put in order a 109 

Pleasant aud Commercial sts. (ward 24), sprinkling, petition 
a 209 

DeWolf St., grading, edgestones, petition a 365 
Downer avenue (Dorchester) — 

Sewer: from Pleasant st. 280 feet, petition a 13, c 16; order of 
notice, a 216,230; hearing a 241 

Grading : petition a 13 
Downer street (Koxbury) — 

Trees: corner Treniont st., petition a 230; order passed 
a 280 

Sewers: petition a 241: hearing 276; order passed 300; dis- 
charged into Urookline sewer a 266 
Downes & Barron — 

Central st.. damages, petition a 124, c 130 
Downing, Emanuel — 

Princeton st., damage to estate, petition c 120, a 125; leave to 
withdraw c 565, a 568 
Downing, .1. K. — 

Kendrick st., rear Lake St., ward 25, wooden addition to 
building, petition c 581, a 686, 591, I 

Kendrick st. .-table, petition a 586; permit 616 
Drew, Alvin S. — 

Appointed constable a 481 



Drew, George G. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Drew, Joseph L. 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Drew, Joshua L. et ul.— 

K st. crosswalk, petition a 230 

l>i> w, Samuel S., et ul. — 

Downer av., sewer, petition a 13; grading, petition a 13 
Driscoll, Daniel F.— 

Appointed public weigher a 297 
Driscoll, James — 

Barker and Gardner sts. (W.It.), movement of iron boiler, per- 
mit a 159 
Drisko, A. S. et al. — 

Warren st. mar Blue Hill av., edgestones, petition a 174 
Drivers* Union Ice Company — 

Rutherford av. (ward 5), wooden building, petition a 327, 
c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 
Dromey, William W. — 

I 111 k ted first assistant assessor c 120, a 124, c 130, a 139 
Drury, Constant F. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 

6 Mt. Pleasant plaee (ward 20), stable, petition a 365; leave to 
withdraw 467 
Drury, Otis, administrator and trustee- 
Assessment of damages for hind taken by Old Colony R.R. Co., 
petition and order of notice a 425 ; hearing, order passed 456 
Duane, John II.— 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Dnard, Franz — 

193 and 195 Centre St., edgestones, sidewalks, order passed a 404 
Dudd\ , John A. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Dudley , Henry, et ul. — 

Albans st., grading, etc., petition a 59 
Dudley, Otis H , councilman (ward 4) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Elected : committee on accounts 10 

Appointed: committee on East lloston ferries 11 ; resigned 412 ; 
public library 11 ; assessors' department 412 

Remarks : 

Visit to Mystic water works 423 
Dudley Peleg, heirs of — 

Treniont st.. sewer, abatement a 98 
Dudley avenue (ward 23) — 

Stable : petition a 499 ; permit 515 
Dudley street — 

Sidewalk: petition a 209; order passed a 248 ; at 780, petition 

a 276 ; order passed 317 
Sprinkling : petition a 213, 230 

" Portion," order passed a 248 
Crosswalks : from Clarence st. to Lewis place, petition a 109 
From Alexander av. to Taylor av., report a 24S 
At intersection of Cottage aud west Cottage sts., petition 

a 480; report 600 
At Howard av., petition a 568 
At Dudley st. opera house, petition a 568 
Wooden buildings . movement from 321 to Langdon St., permit 
a 416 
Movement across Dudley St., permit a 447 
Druggist's mortar: at Upham's corner, pe'ition a 456, c 460; 

report a 472 
Telegraph poles : a 534, 535 
Track: nearly opposite llrook av., petition a 543; report and 

order notice 568 ; hearing 613 : order pained 031 
Stable : near Brook place, petition a 568 ; report 5'JO 
Duereaux, Maria — 

Release granted a 014 
Duffy, Patrick— 

Parnell st., laying out, $300 damages a 466 
Dugan, Daniel — 

Deceased, order to pay dues c 674, a 676 
Duggan, John A. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Duncklee, Joshua S. — 

Nominated assessor c 92 ; elected a 93, c 99 
Dunn, Hugh — 

Appointed field-driver aud pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Dunn, Patrick — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Dunning, J . N. — 

East lloston, house offal, contract authorized c 695, a 700 
Dunreath place (ward 21) — 

ible: corner Warren st., petition a 499; permit 615 
I>imtnn, I. M. & Co.— 

2086-87 Washington St., Ian I damages, petition a 543 

Durham street — 

Grading a 47, c 49, 71 
Dwyer, William IV . et ul. — 

Chelsea st, from .Maverick sq. to Decatur st., macadamizing, 
petition a 349 
Dyer, John A. — 

Appointed weigher and inspector of buudle hay a 125 
Dyer, Mieah, jr. — 

Upham's Corner to corner Upham's av. and Hancock st. (ward 
24), crosswalk, petition a 568 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXIII 



E street — 

Lamps : petition a 13 

Grade damages, order to pay a 29 
Eagle square — 

Grading and macadamizing : petition a 241 
Eagle street — 

Grading and macadamizing : petition a 241 

Grading and gravelling: from Putnam to Prescott sts., petition 
a 241 
Earl street — 

Lamps: petition a 241 

Stable : petition a 349 ; permit 402 
East Boston Citizens' Trade Association — 

Contagious diseases, petition a 155, c 160; leave to withdraw 
a 198, c 200 

Porter st. sewer, petition to relay from Bremen st. to outlet 
a 297 

Sewer improvements at East Boston, petition a 327 

Playgrounds, petition c 346 
East Boston ferries — see Ferries 
East Boston Gas Light Co. — 

Contract authorized a 545 
East Boston Savings Bank — 

Terrace St. from Tremont st. to end of Drury block, edge- 
stones, sidewalks, petition a 258 

Chelsea St., sidewalks, edgestones, petition a 425 
East Boston Trade Association — 

Ferry slip, foot of State St., petition a 43, c 49 
East Broadway — 

Wooden building: movement from East Fourth st., petition 
a 276 

Tracks : connection with track on Emerson St., petition a 241 ; 
hearing 314 ; permit 430 

Error corrected in conveyance of land a 618, e 621 
East Canton street- 
Sidewalks : between Harrison av. and Albany St., petition a 465 
East Chester park — 

Movement of wooden building a 155, 179 

Stable : petition a 213 

Petition to put in order a 241 

Grading, etc.; from Albany st. to Five corners a 258, c 398, 
a4u0 

Extension : damages a 352 

GradiDg: from Five corners to Clapp st. c 461, a 465, c 490, 
a 499 
East Dedham street — 

New bond and agreement for land a 155, c 160, a 211, c 220 

Reduction in price of land, petition a 468, c 475 ; leave to with- 
draw a 499, c 502 
East Dover street — 

S.B. Railroad Co. permit to connect track with Metropolitan 
a 467 
East Eagle street — 

Lamps, petition a 241 
East Eighth street — ■ 

Edgestones ; abatement of assessment a 139 
No. 273, petition a 514 

Sidewalks : between Dorchester and Lowland sts, petition a 189 ; 
order passed 388 
At 251, petition a 425 ; order passed 447 
East Fifth street- 
Sidewalk : petition a 109 ; order passed a 317 
At 561, petition a 258 
At 553, petition a 456 ; order passed 467 

Sewer: 125 ft. from O St., petition a 468; order notice, 500; 
hearing 514 ; order passed 534 

Wooden building : at 779, enlargement, petition c 475 a 480 ; 
permit c 526, a 533 

Edgestones, sidewalk : Nos. 548 & 550, petition a 499 
East First street (ward 14) — 

Erection of wooden building a 124, c 130 
East Fourth street — 

Sidewalk : No. 590, order passed a 198 

Wooden building: movement to East Broadway, petition a 276 

Paving : order passed a 317 
East Newton street — 

Cancelling conditions upon land, a 155, cl60, a 211, c 220 

Repaving and putting in order, petition a 480 
East Ninth street- 
Paving a 327 
East Second street — 

Lamps: petition a 43 

"Wooden building : movement from No. 912 to rear of 582 East 
Third st. a 209, 217. 
East Seventh street — 

Sidewalk : No. 411, petition a 543 
East Sixth street- 
Wooden buildings : petition a 327, c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 

Movement from 879 across street, petition a 499 ; permit 521 

Grade : between P and Q sts., petition a 514 
East Swett street — 

Bradley Fertilizer Co., wooden building a 43, c 49, a 110 
East Third street — 

Estate of Adoniram Burrill, taxes, forfeiture a 112, c 120 

Wooden buildings: rear of No. 582, movement from 912 East 
Second St. a 209, 217 



To No. 582, movement from P St., a 209, 217 
Near K st. erection c 373, a 383 
Claims : personal injuries, petition c 694, a 700 
Eastern avenue — 

Telegraph posts a 29 
Soutb ferry : widening c 585, a 5S6 
Name changed to Congress st. a 401 

" Run " : No. 24, Boston Cold Storage and Freezing Co., per- 
mit a 691 
Eastern avenue wharf — 

Placing in charge of directors of East Boston ferries, referred 
a 651, c 652 ; report, order passed c 695, a 700 
Eaton, Jasper H. — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Eaton square — 

Named a 199, c 200, 229, 240, a 244, c 249, 295, a 297, 316 
Eddy,D. et al.— 

Gibson st. (ward 24), grading, etc., petition a 443 
Edgarton, Mrs. M. J.- 
Berkeley St., personal injuries, petition c 581, a 586; leave to 
withdraw c 695. a 700 
Edgewood street (ward 21) — 

Sidewalks : petition a 77 ; order passed 471 
Sidewalks, etc. : petition a 383 
Edgeworth, Henry — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Cambridge st., North 
Harvard and Western ave. bridges a 388 
Edgeworth street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 109, c 120 
Edwards, J. et ah — 

Longwood av., plank walk, petition a 545 
Egan, John — 

Jamaica Plain, personal injuries, petition a 213, c 230 ; leave to 
withdraw a 264, c 268 
Egleston square — 

Grammar school-house, a 247, c 249 
Eighth street — 

Edgestones, gutters, sidewalks : between K and M sts.. order 

passed a 317 
Stable : at 271. petition a 349 ; leave to withdraw 701 
Sidewalks : between H and I sts., order passed a 404; No. 517, 
petition a 586 
Eldon street — 

Petition to put in order a 59 ; order passed 467 
Eldridge, James T. — 

Crawford st., sewer, petition a 468 
Eldridge, J. Oscar — 

Blue ilill av., relocation near Canterbury and Harvard sts., 
$300 damages a 617 
Elections — 

Standing committee of common council 4 
John E. Bowker, seat contested 6, 32 
Special election in ward 20 a 46, 95 
City laborers allowed time to vote a 46, c 49, a 62, c 66 
Special election in Charlestown a 62, 98 
Vacancy in ward 3 c 256, a 258, 327, c 340 
Special election, June 5 a 266, 327, c 337 
Employes allowed time to vote c 296, a 297, c 532, a 533 
Special election in ward 6 a 352, 367, 387 
Polling-places a 430, 482, 485 
Inspectors a 481, 485, 499, 514, 518, 533 
Warrants for state election a 516 
Council chamber opened on evening of elections c 538 
Election returns, national, state and county officers : commit- 
tee a 545 ; report 557, 573 
Abolition of election precincts c 566, indefinitely postponed 581 
Warrants for city election a 587 
Election returns, municipal officers: committee a 650, 663; 

report 665, 689 
$40 for services, order passed c 692 
Registrars of voters : 

Joseph M. Wightman appointed registrar a 109 
Transfer of items of appropriation c 564, a 568, 587, c 601 
$2500 additional appropriation a 682, c 692 
Elevated Railroads — 

Cambridge and South Boston Railroad Associates a 425, 456, 

465,516,518, 534 
Charlestown and Milton Railroad Company Associates a 447, 

465, 516, 518, 534 
Boston and Dorchester Railroad Company Associates, a 44S, 

465, 516, 518. 534 
Boston and Brookline Railroad Company Associates a 448, 465, 

516, 518, 534 
Petitions for charters a 533, c 536, a 543, e 548 ; notice of hear- 
ing before railroad commissioners referred a 586; report, 
city solicitor instructed to appear a 591 
Eliot, Nathaniel G. et a!.— 

Fairland St., grading, etc., petition a 213 ; order passed 467 
Eliot Square — 

Sprinkling : a 213 

" Portion, 1 ' order passed a 248 
Eliot street — 

Posting of bills on fences a 43, c 49 
Bill board c 57, a 59, 85, c 86 

Land: junction of l'leasant st. and Columbus av., sale author- 
ized a 85, 95, c 99 



XXIV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



graph poles: near Pleasant St. and Columbus av., permit 
a 4 Hi 
Passenger wagon : from Somerville line, leave to withdraw a 429 
Lantern : No. 20, petition a 551 
Elliot street (ward 23)— 

Stable: corner Eliot place, petition a 230 
Crosswalk : petition a -41 
Elliott, Thomas .).— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Ellery street — 

Grading and macadamizing between Swett and Boston sts., 
also edgestone, petition :i 230 ; order passed 317 

Sewer : between Swett and Boston sts., petition a 443 

Ellis, Freeman l). etui. — 

Petition that South Cedar-St. pi. be lighted a 124 
Ellis, N. G.— 

Pairland 3t., edges tones, petition a 456 
Ellis, George it al. — 

Boston st., macadamizing, petition a 43 
Ellis, Rowland et al. — 

Improvement of passage-ways rear of Treinont St., petition 
a 365, c 370 
Ellis, William J.— 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 121 
Elm street (ward 23) — 

Crossing: opposite Hillside school-house, petition a 241 
Elm street (Charlcstnwn) — 

Lamps : petition a 13 
Elmore street — 

Sever: petition a 174 ; hearing 276 ; order passed 300 
Macadamising : petition a 241 

ble : corner W iluiot St., petition a 551 ; permit 574 
Emerald street- 
Sidewalk : petition a 443; order passed 458 
Emerson street- 
Sidewalk : petition a 189; order passed 404 

15 to 25, petition a 400 ; order passed 410 
Track: connection with tracks on East Broadway, petition 
a 241; hearing 311; permit 430 
Emm , George F. trustee— 

139 Maicella St., sidewalks, petition a349; order passed 367 
Emery, Harriet Q . 

548 and 550 10 ist Fifth St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 499 
Emery, Sarah A. — 

Kcnnard av., sewer, §4 21 abatement a 212 
Emery, Willis T.— 

Ward Bt. (ward 20), stable, petition a 59 ; permit a 84 
Emery, W. II. & S. L.— 

Federal st., sprinkling, petition a 327 
Emery, \V. II. et al. — 

\\ eston st., from Cabot to Warwick sts., grading, petition a 425; 
order passed 4S3 
F^ndicott street — 

Projection of step at 208, petition a 213 : leave to withdraw 534 
Paving : petition a 319 ; order passed 367 
Enfield street- 
Stable: petition a 414 ; permit 429 

Sewer : petition a 405 ; order for hearing 472; hearing 480 ; order 
passed 500 
Engineer, city, department of— 

Joint standing committee a 11, a 12, c 312 
Joseph P. Davis nominated and elected city engineer a 64 ; c 87 ; 
resignation a 111 : accepted a 129, c 130 
itant engineer authorized to discharge duties of city engi- 
neer e 147, a 156 
llenrv M. VVightman nominated and elected city engineer a 111, 

c 117 
Authorized to purchase supplies etc. a 30, c 31, 54 
Annual report a 1 1", 

Proposed amendment of ordinance c 136, a 139, c IBS, a 189 
Englewood avenue (Brighton) — 

Blank walk : petition a 13 
Engley, Noah M. — 

Beach st., near Medlbrd St. (ward 4), stable, permit a 352 
English, John, heirs of — 

Cambridge st. (Brighton), sewer, $52.27 abatement a 472, 558 
Estabrook, Rufus — 

Newbury Bt. extension, §9036 damages a 111, 281 
53 Blue llillav., sidewalk, petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
E-street Congregational Soeiet.i — 

Petition for street lamp a 13 
Essex street — 

i Beach Bt., Harrison av. and Washington st., 
petition a 139; leave to withdraw 402 
Extension : resolve and order from street commissioners re- 
ferred a 21l,i' 220 ; report, order passed c 2 
damages, orders passed a 205,281, 300, 317, 353, 402, 421) 
Damages, petition a 533 
Sewer : in extension, formerly South-street court, report and 

order notice a 115 : bearing 420; order passed 446 
Lamp-p ists : Globe theatre, permits 410 
Claims : personal injuries, petition a G29, c 635 
Eustis street — 

Crosswalk : petition a 121 
Eutaw street- 
Sidewalks : petition a 349 ; order passed 447 



Evans, Brice S. — 

West Camden st., lot of land a 366, c 370, 398, a 400 
Evans, F., trustees oj estate Of — 

Beach and Lincoln sts., telegraph pole, petition a 551 

Evans, W. J. 11. et al.— 

South St., edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, macadamizing, peti- 
tion a 77 
Kneeland st., between Albany and South sts., grading, petition 
a 258 

Evans street — 

Lamps: petition a 365, 568 
Everett street — 

Sidewalk ; abatement a 109, 145 
Everett street (ward 2)— 

Wooden buildings; No. 47, extension, petition a 276, c 283; 
report, no action necessary, a350, c 354 ; removal a 521 
at 45, erection, petition c 346 
Movement, petition a 518 

Stable : at 47, petition a 349; remonstrance 349 ; permit 415 
Everett street (ward 25) — 

Hitching post : petition a 533 
Exchange street — 

Sample of new street pavement a 212 

F street — 

Wooden building, between First and Dove sts., petition a 59, 
: permit a 126, c 130 

Stable: petition a 383; permit 534 

Petition to put in order between Seventh and Eighth sts., a 413 

Lamp : corner Gold st., petition a 51S 

Claims : personal injuries, petition a G03, c 670 
Pagan, Ellen — 

292 Bolton st., grade damages, order passed a 558 
Fail bairn, Robert B. — 

W arren st., sidewalk, petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
inks. Onn — 

Cambridge st. (Brighton), abatement of sewer assessmenta 112 
Fairfield street — 

Edgestones, gutters, grading, etc., between Newbury and Boyl- 
Ston sts., petition a 413 
-tones, sidewalks : petitiona 480; order passed 500 

Sidewalks : petition a v.''.) 

'frees : petition a 518, c 528 
Pairland street — 

Grading, etc. a 213 

Edgestones and sidewalk : cor. Mt. Pleasant av., petition a 241 

Edge-tones : petition a 450 ; order passed 467 
Fairweather, James, et al. — 

Lamps, petition a 43 
Fallon, John B. — 

Dallas place, removal of trees, petition a 109 
Fallon, Thomas M. et al. — 

Mt. Hope street, grading, etc., petition a 20 
Falmouth street — 

Edgestones : petition a 425 
Falvey, Catherine — 

179 West Ninth st. (S. B.) abatement of sidewalk assessment, 
petition a 124; permit al45 
Faneuil Hall Market — see Markets 
Faneuil Hall — see Buildings 
Faneuil Hall National Bank, el a?. — 

South Market >t., paviug, petition a 77 
Faneuil Hall square- 
Street and passageway at No. 40, occupying portions a 258, 281, 
Faneuil street (ward 25) — 

Petition to put in order a 59 
Farnham street (ward 20) — 

Wooden buildings : mar Gerard st., petition a 613, c 621 
Parnswortb, 10. — 

Howard av. (ward 20) , stable : petition a 414; leave to withdraw 
407 
Parnswortb, Walter — 

01 Dearborn st., sidewalk, order passed a 248 
Parnswortb street — 

Grading, etc., petition a276 
Farr George W. — 

A ppointed constable 
Farrcil, Hose- 
Claims: personal injuries, petition c 82, a 43; report, further 
action inexpedient e 173, a 174; petition e 312 

Parren, Susan — 

75 Liverpool st., abatement of sidewalk assessment, petition 
a 20 ; permit o 
Farrington, John — 

Condition in deed changed to restriction a 300, c 370 
Farwell, Frank P., councilman (ward 15) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on harbor 11; health 11 
Farwell, li. I!. — 

Mt. Vernon st. near Dorchester st. (ward 15), stable, petition 
a 568 ; report 
Paucett, Kichard — 

Maverick st. (ward 2), stable, petition a 189 
Faulkner & Chapman, el al. — 

llaucock st. (Charlestown), sewer, petition a 414; order for 
hearing 415; hearing 420; order passed 429 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXV 



Fay, Peter, et al. — 

Cabot st. at Dallas place, crosswalk, petition a 258; report 531 
Federal street — 

Fire of Dec. 2S, 29, 1S79, investigation c 21, 31, 40, a43; reports 
of inspector of buildings c 73, a 77; report of fire commis- 
sioners c 151 

Running empty cars a 174, 198 

Stable: petitio"n a 213 

Sprinkling : petition a 327 

Telegraph p les : outside N.Y. & N.E. Railroad depot, petition 
a 443 ; report 471 ; petition a 607 ; order passed 618 

Lamp-posts : opposite N.Y. & N.E.R.R. station, petition a 586; 
order passed 618 

Track: Met. R.R. Co., permit a 618 

South Boston R.R. Co., additional cars, order passed a 630 
Fee, Thomas jr. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Feely, Thomas — 

Appointed undertaker a 189 
Feeny, John — 

Appointed undertaker a 189 
Feenj', Peter — 

Broadway near B St., personal injuries, petition c 652, a 663 
Felch, Hiram E. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Fellner, Albert — 

Myrtle st. (Dorchester) trespass by agents of city, petition 
a 124 
Fence-viewers — 

Appointments a 214, c 222 
Fenderson, .John — 

Appointed public weigher a 314 
Fennelley, Richard .1. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124, c 130, a 139 c 147 
Fenno, William — 

Bowdoin st. near Union av., stable, petition a 297, permit 317 
Ferdinand, Frank — 

7 Warren St., hoisting beam, petition a 93 ; permit a 112 
Ferdinand street — 

Crosswalk : from Chandler to Tremont St., petition a 400 

Bridge repairs a 403 
Ferries — 

.Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Directors nominated and elected a 29, c 31, 55, 137, 147, a 156, 
c274 

Funeral hearses free a 29, c 31 

Gates at the ferries c 153 a 156 

Ferry tolls a 176. 198, 458, c 460, 590, a 649, 701 

Organization of directors a 244 

Vacancy in board of directors c 256, a 258 

Annual report c 283 

¥300 for Fourth of July a 353, c 355 

Claims: Edwin L.Crockett, injuries to self and team, petition 
a 209, c 220 

Christopher Mulready, injuries to self and handcart, petition 
a 209, c 220 

New landing at T wharf, petitions a 213, 230, 241, 258, 327, 349 ; 
order to petition for authority a 589, 591, c 601 ; referred to 
next city government a 688, c 692 

Laying out approaches : remonstrance, and petition for hearing 
a 314 

South ferry : widening Eastern av. c 585, a 586 

Eastern-av. wharf, placing in care of ferry directors, referred a 
651, c 652 ; report, order passed c 695, a 700 
Ferry street — 

Sidewalks : order passed a 404 
Field, J. W.— 

Melville av. (ward 24), stable, petition a 174; permit a 198 
Edgestones, petition a 425 ; order passed 447 
Field, James B. et al. — 

Mt. Vernon st. (Dorchester), petition to put in order a 456 

Willow court, petition that it be lighted a 568 
Field-drivers and pound-keepers — 

Appointments a 214, c 222, a 335, c 337, a 590, c 601 
Fifth street- 
Sidewalks : petition a 174 ; report and order a 198 

Crossings: corner N St., petition a 413 

Lantern : corner P St., petition a 414 ; permit 429 

Damage by surface water : report referred a 515, 521, c 523 
Fillebrown, George O. — 

39 Clay st. (Uoxbury), purchase of estate c 532, a 533, 558, 
c 559 
Finance — 

Joint standing committee c 4, 7 

Ordinance to amend ordinance in relation to finance referred 
a 615, c 021 : report referred a 663, c 670 
Finn, John A. — 

Appointed undertaker a 297 
Finn, Michael — 

Appointed public weigher a 241 
Finneron, William — 

Corner Tremont and Downer sts., trees, petition a 230; order 
passed a 280 
Finnerty,.John, etal.— 

Conant st., grading, edgestones near Bumstead lane, petition 
a 276 ; order passed 558 



Fire department — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 

Engine-houses, furniture, repairs, etc., authorized a "0, c 31, 54 

Report of fires and alarms for Dec. a 15 : Feb. c 136 ; March 

a 211; April a 259; May a 329 ; June a 401 ; July a 444; 

Aug. a 470 ; Sept. c 526 ; Oct. c 602; Nov. 635 
Pensioning firemen c 57, a 59 
Fire marshal c 57, a 59, 94, c 99 

Alarm-bell on engine-house No. 15 a 85, c 86, a 144, c 146 
Fire-alarm bell, engine-house No. 22 c 92, a 93, cl53, a 156 
Protection from fire, plan of Edward Atkinson and petitions in 

favor c 122, a 125. c 153, a 246, c 249 
Ambulance for tires c 123, a 125, c 153, a 156 
Fire-alarm appaiatus on roof of City Hall a 127, c 130, 147 
Regulation of telegraph and telephone wires — see Telephone 

wires 
Care of hydrants c 207, a 211, c 648, 652, a 663 
Visit by committee to other cities c 240, 325 
Annual report a 277 

Pensioning disabled firemen a 318, c 319 
Steam fire-whistle in Brighton a 365, 499, c 502 
Repair shop c 410, a 415 
Fire alarms a 416, c 418, a 426, 499, c 502 
Engine-house on Back Bay c 424. a 427 
Removal of engine No. 12 a 534, 543, 5-18, 687, c 692, a 700 
Telegraph posts : on Warren St. (Koxbury) a 59, 85 
On Swett st. a 663, 691 
On Harris av., Jamaica Plain a 109, 127 
On Roanoke av. a 127 

Corner Boylston and Arlington sts., and Dorchester av. 
Near Fuller St., petition a 518; permit 534 

Fire on Federal and Devonshire sts., Dec. 28, 29, 1879, investi- 
gation c 21, 31, 40, a 43; report of inspector of buildings 

c 73, a 77 ; report of fire commissioners c 151 
Henry W. Longley appointed commissioner a 209, c 222 
Removal of fire reservoir corner Ruggles and Cabot sts. a 317, 

c319 
Claim: Catherine Murphy, death of son, petition a 485; leave 

to withdraw a 515, c 523 : petition for hearing a 533, c 536 
Clock : church of St. Augustine, Dorchester St., order passed 

a 557, c 559 
Fire-alarm box located, Berkeley st. near Columbus av. a 700 
First street — 

Near L St., wooden building moved from a 59, 85 

Wooden building, No. 60, near Granite, petition a 193, c 146 : 

permit c 173, a 175 
Steam-engine: No. 179, petition and order of notice a 156; 

hearing a 209 ; permit a 216 
Stable : petition a 174; permit a 198 

Sprinkling : petition a 213 ; " portion," order passed a 248 
Edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, macadamizing: between N.Y. 

and N.E.R. and E St.. petition a 93; order passed 317 
Grading and gravelling: between P and Q sts., order passed 

a 317 
Crossing: at C St., petition a 607 
First Freewill Baptist Church — 

Somerset St., crosswalk at Pemberton sq. petition a 124 ; report 

a 145 
First German Baptist Church — 

Culvert place, stable, remonstrance a 414 
Fisher, George A., councilman (ward 24) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on engineer's department 11 ; ordinances 

11; judiciary 11; legislative matters 12; death of Joseph 

Kenney 204 
Remarks : 

City hospital 90, 100 

Free concerts 234 

Fouth-end branch library 323 

Truants and absentees from school 406 

Committee on legislative matters 549, 579 
Fisher, James — 

57 Blue Hill av., sidewalk, petition a 518; order passed 546 
Fiske's wharf, proprietors of — 

Commercial-st. line, grade damages, petition a 468 
Fitch & Joy- 
Steam engine at 377 Commercial st., petition and order of notice 

a 175 ; hearing a 213 ; permit 246 
Fitch, E. O.— 

Buckingham st. (ward 10), stable, petition a 443; permit 458 
Fitchburg Railroad Co. — 

Charles River av., curved track, permit a 650 

Front St., rear, near Union st. (ward 5), wooden building, 

petition a 663, c 670 
Fitton, James, et al. — 

Saratoga st., between Bremer and Wadsworth sts., sidewalks, 

petition a 139 
Fitzgerald, Michael, et al. — 

Bremen and Pope sts., lamps, petition a 349 
Fitzgerald, Patrick — 

Deceased, paj meat to widow c 475 
Fitzpatriek, John IS. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Fitzpatriek, John B., councilman (ward 8) — 
Oaths of office 1 



XXVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Appointed: committee on engineer's department 11; survey aud 

inspection of buildings 11 ; fourth of July 348 
Remai Us : 

aries of city officers 150 
Stony brook 288 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 355 
Salary of superintendents of Chelsea bridge 625 
Fitzpatrick, John J. — 

Tufts st., gaslight, petition a 383 
Fitzpatrick, \\". II. et <d.— 

Dorchester ay. between Washington and Codmau sts., grading, 
petition a 276 
Flagg, 1). V. it a!.— 

Endicott St. (ward 7), paving, petition a 349 ; order passed 367 
Fleet street — 

Claims : personal injuries c 32, a 43, c 137, a 139 
Fleming, Edward 3. — 

Passenger wagon from Park sq. to excursion boats, petition a 
230, permit 209 
Fletcher, William — 

Passenger wagons from Fitchburg station to Litchfield's and 
Batter; wharves, petition a 139; report a 176 
Flint, Charles I.. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Florence street — 

.1 unction of Drown av., widening, damages a 466 
Flusk, Michael ('.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Flynn, James Joseph, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on armories 12 ; Faneuil hall and county 

buildings 12 (resigned 30) ; paving 12; common 12; sala- 
ries 13; streets (joint) 13; streets (board of aldermen) 12; 
topics in mayor's address 14; new court-house 15; celebra- 
tion of 2j)0tb anniversary 44 : harbor defences 44 ; auditor's 
estimates 125; fourth of July 243; reducing number of 
constables 415; state election returns 545; municipal elec- 
tion returns 650 
Remarks : 

nth Boston park 47, 139 

Decoration da\ 58, 297 

Waste of water 61. 88, 87 

Care of public grounds 01 

Drawing of jurors 04 

File marshal 94 

Notices <d committee meetings 110 

City hospital 110 

Hoard ot health 114 
Superintendents of bridges 143 

nth Boston railroad stable 159, 174 
Bouth Boston railroad 179 
Appropriation bill 190 
Pay ol laborers 197, 217,304 
Eaton square 244, 297 

Telegraph and telephone lines 200, 353, 431, 556 
New court-house 262, 298, 314, 336, 588, 695, 608, 611, 613 
West Koxburv and South lioston parks 26/ , 533, 543, 631, 

691 
Barrel wagons 315, 328, 44C 

Centl e-St. sewer 334 
Name fin- Hack-bay park 335 
Truants and absentees from school 401 
Public library site 4')2, 414,431 
-brook nuisance 403 

260th anniversary 13;;. I 

Constables 456, 4^5, 534 

Regulating steamboats 465 

Polling-places 4 S3, 485 

Boston water power company 614 

Evening high school 519 

Defalcation in treasurer's office 521, 586, 014 

Increase of police force 543, 550, 629 

Stony-brook laborers 54 I 

Constitutional amendment abolishing tax qualification of 
voters 662 

Public clock in Dorchester 557 

St. Elizabeth's hospital site 575, 618 

Free soap 614 

Vacancies in board of aldermen 630 

Transfer of powers to overseers of poor 677 

Care of neglected children 687 
Flynn, J. l\— 

Appointed publie weigher a 314 
Flynn, Thomas — 

Appointed inspector of petroleum and coal oils a 125 
Fogg, Emily W. — 

Treinout st ., near Music hall entrance, personal injuries, peti- 
tion a 676, c 692 
Folan, Martin '1'. councilman (ward 13) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on paving 11 
Remarks ; 

Salaries of city officers 150 

Extension of Broadway 107 

Investigation of death of Joseph Kenncy 172, 203 

Pay of laborers 348, 364, 400, 411 



Barrel wagons 359 

Visitors to city hospital on Sundays 5S3 
Salary of superintendents of Chelsea bridge 625 
Folan, Martin T.— 

Petition that special laborers of paving department at South 
Boston be put at work a 26 
Foley, Bernard et <il. — 

I'algewood st., sidewalks etc., petition a 383 
Foley, Catherine — 

Hanover st., personal injuries, petition a 297, c 307 
Foley, John — 

Movement of wooden building from 221 to 287 Webster St. 
(ward 2). petition a 443 
Foley, Matthew A. — 

52 Woodbine St., lamp, petition a 139 
Folger, Thomas — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Folsom, (ieorge P. — 

10 Alleghany St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 51S ; order 
I 546 
Forbes, W. II.— 

Appointed public weigher a 213 
Ford D. S.— 

82 Northampton st. (ward 18), stable, petition a 276, permit317 
Forest street — 

Claims : sewer, refunding amount paid, petition a 568, c 576 
Forest Hills avenue — 

Petition to put in order a 43 
Forest Hills street — 

Sewer : petition a 174; hearing 276; order passed 335 

Wooden building : near Washington st. (ward 23) , petition a 20*.), 

c 220; permit a 248 
Edgestones : corner (Jieen St., petition a 400; order passed 416 
Petition a 425; order passed 447 
1'orristall, Henry M. — 

Appointed constable a 456 

Fort, William A.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
Fort avenue — 

Sewer : petition a 411, 425; order for hearing 415; hearing 420 

St. Elisabeth's hospital: remonstrance a 414; report 547 ; pur- 
chase of property a 547, c 518, 565 
Foss, Elijah 1). — 

Appointed constable a 499 
Foss street (Charlcstown) — 

Telephone poks a 270, 318 
Foster, Dwight, et «l., trustees — 

Beacon st. entrance t > Back Bay park— see Parks 

Exchange ot land on l'arker st. a 365, c 370, a 417, c 419, a 419, 
c 4o4 
Foster, O. E. et .</. — 

Walnut av., between Warren St. and Egleston sq. (Roxbury), 
sprinkling, petition a 209 
i James, heirs of — 

Adams st. relocation, $72.80 damages a 112 
Foster, W. B. it '(I. — 

M st., edgestones, gutters, etc., petition a 93; order passed 317 
Foster street — 

Sewer: petition a 514; order passed 520 
Fottler, Jacob, et ill. — 

Glen road, petition a43 

Foundry street — 

Caving : from West Fourth st. to Swan St., order passed a 430 
Poles: between West Fourth st. and Dorchester av., petition 

a 533 ; permit 
Wooden buildings : corner Dorchester av., petition a 327, c 337 ; 
permit a 350, c 354 
Movement, petition a 518 ; permit oil 

Nearly opposite Division st. near West Fourth St., erection, 
petition a 551, c 559 
Fourth street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 13, c 16 

Injuries to horse a 456, c 460 
Paving: between Dorchester and Atlantic sts. a 43 
Between l. and N sts., order passed a 404 

Removal of track : between K and I, sts., petition a 211 
Fourth of July — See Boston celebrations 
Fowler, (ieorge 11. it ill. — 

Burroughs St., sidewalks, petition a 413; order passed 467 
Foxwell, Benjamin — 

Nos. 661-663 Barker st., edgestones, petition a 568 
Framingham, town of — 

Water from Farm pond and Sudbury river, notice of application 
to Legislature a 514, <• ,. rt, referred with instruc- 

tions :i 1120, c 035 
Frampton, James A. — 

Corner Wvinan and I.amartine sts. (ward 22), stable, permit 
a 159 

Frampton, It. I/, et al. — 

Neponset ai ., petition a 43 
Francis street — 

Blank walk : from Treinont st. to Brookline av. a 124 

Bewers i damages a 402 

Discharge into Brookline sewer a 266 
Franey, John J. — 

Zeigler st., injuries to horse, petition a 400, c 405 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXYII 



Appointed constable a 456 
Franklin, Benjamin, et al. — 

Palmer St., paving, petition a 97 
Franklin, lienjauiin — 

Palmer St., sewer, petition a 258 
Franklin Savings Bank — 

Adams St. (ward 24) , edgestone abatement, order passed a 666 
Franklin fund — see also Sinking funds 

Examination of accounts a 48, 65 
Franklin street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 109, c 120 
Metropolitan Railroad Co., tracks a 155, 213, 247 
Freeman, James G., councilman (ward 10) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on public lands 11 

Care of hydrants 207 
Elected : committee on accounts 396 ; clerk 462 
Remarks : 

Sale of public lands 166 
Public parks 235, 510 
Arnold arboretum 237 
Owners of West Roxbury park 238 
Stony brook 290 

Enlargement of City hospital 606 
Freeman, Michael, Jr. — 

Highland Park St., damages to estate, petition a 124 
Freide, Charles, et al. — 

Use of ward-rooms, petition a 425, c 436 
French, Abram — 

Estate between Centre and Chestnut sts. and Centre place 
(ward 23), stable, petition a 109; permit a 128 
French, Jonathan, et al. — 

Plan of land between Warren st., Blue Hill av., Seaver st., 

Walnut av., and Townsend St., petition a 174, c 181 
Wyoming st. Roxbury, lamps, petition a 518 
French, Walter II. et al. — 

Tremont st. at Providence railroad crossing, crosswalks, etc., 
petition a 551 
Frohock, Horatio E. — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Front street — 

Wooden building: near Union st. (ward 5), petition a 653, 
c670 
Fuel — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 
Fuller, Charles H. etal.— 

Teams on street department, petition a 425 
Fuller, Frank- 
Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Fuller, J. Franklin, et al., trustees — 

48 Lincoln st. curbstones, petition a 613 
Fuller street (ward 24) — 

Stables : corner Milton av., petition a 43; permit 65 
Petition a 349 ; permit 367 
Plank walk a 189 
Fulton street — 

Steam engine : No. 52, petition, order notice a 519 ; hearing, 
permit 551 



G street — 

Nuisance, petition a 400, c 405 ; leave to withdraw a 547, o 548 

Land damages, petition a 568 
G.A.R. — see Decoration day 
Gahm, Joseph — 

Monument sq. and Laurel st., hitehiug-posts, petition a 209 
Gahn, Joseph — 

Stable, petition a 43 ; permit a 65 
Gallagher, Charles T. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Gallagher, Francis II. — 

Preble St., grade damages, petition a 456 
Gallagher, William II.— 

Blue Hill av., plank walk, petition a 433; relocation, $43.50 
damages a 500 

Blue Hill av., edgestoues, petition a 568 
Gallagher, W. II. et al.— 

Blue Hill av., oil lamps from Columbia to Harvard st., petition 
a 13 
Galvin, John- 
Appointed supt. Neponset bridge a 126 

Offer to sell gravel a 413 
Gammon, Thomas B. — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Ganter, F. et al. — 

Lamartine St., macadamizing, petition a 59 
Gardner, John — 

Tremont st. near Northampton St., personal injuries, petition 
a 155, c 160 
Gardner, John and F. W. G. May — 

Washington St., widening, $2600 damages a 197 
Gardner, John I,, jr. — 

Stable on unnamed st., near Beaver st. rear Beacon st. (ward 9) , 
petition a 499 ; permit 515 
Gardner, William T. — 

Appointed constable for registrars of voters a 481 



Gardner street (W. R.) — 

Movement of iron boiler a 159 

Petition to put in order a 533 ; report and reference 574 
Gardner street (ward 25) — 

Tree : petition a 241, c 249 

Edgestone : petition a 258 ; report and order a 281 ; petition 
a 297 ; order passed 317 
Garfield, D. L.— 

Injuries by collision with hose carriage, petition c 152, a 156 ; 
leave to withdraw c 274, a 276 
Gargan, Thomas .1 — 

Nominated police commissioner a 125 ; confirmed a 155, c 161 
Gaston street — 

Sewer : abatement a 558 
Gates, B. II — 

Waterpipe through Tileston school-yard, order passed a 630, 
c635 
Gates street (S. B.)— 

Abatement of sidewalk assessment, petition a 26 
Gately. Bridget — 

Woodman st., abatement of sewer assessment a 112 
Gately, Thomas, heirs of — 

Geneva-avenue extension, $850 damages a 534 
Gavin, M. F. — 

Appointed trustee of City hospital a 213, c 222, a 241, c 249 
Gay, George II. et al. — 

Junction Blue Hill av. and Norfolk St., lamp, petition a 499 
Gay, Levi B. et al. — 

Crosswalk on Huntington av. and sidewalk on St. James av., 
petition a 77 
Geary, Matthew — 

Petition for pardon of, a 299; release on probation 317 
Geer, David H. — 

Preble St., laying out from Dorchester av. to Rogers st., $400 
damages a 352 
Geneva avenue — 

Sidewalks, etc. : a 13, 124 

Extension from Columbia to Warren st. via Marston av. 
damages a 353, 366, 466, 534 

Edgestones, etc. : near Warren St., petition a 443 

Petition to put in order a 443 

Wooden building : petition a 543, c 548 

Stable : petition a 543 ; permit 558 
George J.N. — ■ 

Telephone wire fixture on engine house, petition c 274 
George, William, et al. — 

Centre St. (ward 23), lamps, petition a 443 
George street — 

Edgestones, sidewalk, No. 109, petition a 139 ; order passed 
a 159 

Petition to put in order a 213 

Edgestones, sidewalk, estate of Alex. F. Wadsworth, petition 
a 139, order passed a 159 

Edgestones : No. 98, petition a 230; order passed a 248 
No. 106, petition a 349 ; order passed 367 
Geraty, William — 

Tremont street, grade damages, petition a 26 ; leave to withdraw 
a 217 
German Catholic Church — 

Sbawmut av., crossing, petition a 499 
German street — 

Stable : petition a 59; permit a 84 
Gibby, Adam II. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Giblin, Hugh, et al. — 

Sixth st. between C and E sts., paving, petition a 1S9 
Giblin, John II.— 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Gibson street — 

Movement of wooden building from Washington St. a 109, 159 

Grading, etc.: (jetition a 443 
GifTord, Alex. ¥.— 

32 Brook av., sidewalks, petition a 499 ; order passed 574 
Gilford, George W. — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Broadway bridge a 388 
Gilbert, Luther, et al. — 

30-34 1'erriu St., tree, petition a 230 ; order passed a 280 
Gilbert street (ward 23) — 

Lamps : petition a 13 
Gillespie, Mary — 

Release on probation a 317 
Gill, John- 
Elected supt. Chelsea st. bridge c 148, a 156 
Gill, John, jr. — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Chelsea-st. bridge a 388 
Ginn, .John O. — 

Petition for appointment as supt. Charles-river bridge c 373, 
a 3S3 
Gleason, W. II.— 

Washington, between Albano and Beach sts., lighting, petition 
a 139 
Gleason, W. II. et al.— 

Washington st. (ward 23) from Albion to Beech sts., plank 
walk, petition a 480 
Glen road — 

From Walnut av. to Blue Hill av., petition to put in order a 43 



XXVIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Stable: petition a 209; permit a 216 

r : eastwardly from Forest Hill St., petition a 443; order of 
notion 408; hearing 405; order passed 472 
Qlendale street- 
Grade damages : order passed a 430 

Stable : permit a 446 
Glendon Company — 

East Eagle St., lamps, petition a 241 

Eagle St. and sq., grading, macadamizing, petition a 241 
Globe alley — 

Land damages a 415 
Globe Nail Co.— 

Howard st., gas pipe, petition a 297; permit 317 
Gloucester street — 

Grading, etc. : petition a 465 ; order passed 6 

Kdgestones, sidewalks: corner Newbury St., petition a 633; or- 
der passed 558 
Glover, A. II.— 

Devon st. (ward 25) erection of wooden building, petition a 
109, e 120; permit a 136, o 130 
Glover, George it al. — 

Lincoln st. (ward 24), sewer, petition a 174; hearing 27G 
Glover, Horatio A. — 

Narragansett St., petition to put in order a 443 
Glover, J. R.— 

24 .Mather st., sidewalks, petition a 425 ; order passed 447 
Glover, S. P.— 

Appointed public weigher a 314 
Goddard, Thomas, trustee — 

Essex-st. extension, $1290 dam 

South-st. widening, $7350 damages a 281 
Goggin— 

Washington st. near Beach st. (W. 11.) removal of rocks, per- 
mit a '.'4s 
Goggins, Margaret — 

North Bennel St., personal injuries a 93, c 99 
Gold street — 

Lamp : corner F St., petition a 518 

Gold and Stock Telegraph Co. — see Telephone wires 
Goldsmith, George W, 'l al. — 

Centre and Ore hard sts., sewer, remonstrance a 465 
Goldsmith. Henrietta — 

34 Ward St., grade damages, order passed a 471 

Goldsmith, Simon — 

Corner Ward and lldleck sts., grade damages, order passed 
a 471 
Goldthwait, F. J.— 

Chosen clerk of police commissioners a 258 
Good, Timothy .). — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Goodale, George IV. <t al. — 

Madison street, petition a 43 
Goodman, Eleanor — 

273 East Eighth St., sidewalk, petition a .">14 
Goodnow, J. W. it al.— 

Centre st. (Jamaica 1'lain), gutters, petition a 241 
Goodrich, F. E. — 

Appointed mat or's clerk a 13 
Goodwin, F. II & Co.— 

Corner Avon and Chauncy sts., flag signs, petition a 443 ; leave 
to withdraw 4(37 
Goodwill, James F. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Goodwin, W. II — 

Guilds street, sewer, remoustrance a 514 
Gordon, Robert \V. — 

Sprinkling streets in Charlestown, petition a 189 

Gorman, Dennis J. — 

Appointed constable a 45G 
Gorman, William — 

Decease a 15, C 16 
Gormley, John — 

Sprinkling streets in city, petition a 174 
Gould, George F. — 

Appointed harbor master a 83 
Goward, .John B. E. — 

Norfolk st., widening, SI 12.80 damages a 144 

Blue Hill av. and Norfolk st., edgestoues, petition a 468 ; order 
passed 500 

Grace, James J — 

Exchange st., sample of new pavement, petition a 59, pern, it 
a 212 
Grace, Patrick — 

Sprinkling streets in Brighton, petition a 189 
Grace Mission Society — 

Ose of wardroom In ward 3, petition a 663, c 670 : permit c 695, 
a 700 
Graham, Joseph — 

Paul st , closing, petition a 213, permit a 217 

Albion and Paul sts., sidewalks, petition a 456; order passed 
467 
Grain — 

Measurers appointed a 125, 155 
Grampian way — 

Grading, etc. a 77 

Blank walk : petition a 676 



Grand Junction wharf — 

Boston and Albany railroad, wooden building, petition a 124, 
c 130; permit a 173, c 175 
Granite avenue (Dorchester) — 

Lamps: petition a 456 
Grant, Charles E. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
( Irant, Augustus — 

Appointed constable 456 
Gray, Horace, chief justice Supreme Judicial Court — 

Administers oaths of office 1, 2, 3 
Gray, D. H.— 

271 Eighth street (ward 15), stable, petition a 349; leave to 
withdraw 701 
Gray, William, jr. et al. — 

Substitution of four-foot burner for street lamps, petition a59; 
report 665 
Gray. William, et al. — 

Taking lands, order notice a 500 ; hearing 518 
Gray, William, assignee — 

Boston Hemp Manuf. Co., release of rights, petition a 514; or- 
der passed a 574, c 576 
Grav street — 

Sidewalk : No. 32, petition a G07 
Green, Alfred P.— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Green, Jag as — 

Appointed public weigher a 109, 209 
Green street — 

Crosswalk : petition a 139 
Green street (Jamaica Plain) — 

Grading: between Forest Hills and Washington sts., petition 
a 213 

Crosswalks ; at Union av.. petition a 213 ; report 248 
At Call st.. petition a 213 

Pole~ : corner Boj Iston St., permit a 631 
Green street (Charlestown) — 

Claims : personal injuries a 209, c 220, a 352, c 354 
Greene, Reuben, i t al. — 

Dale av. (Koxbury), lamps, petition a 499 
Greenough avenue — 

Sidewalks : north aide, petition a 514 
Qreenougb, Malcolm S., councilman (ward 9) — 

Oaths of 

Elected : committee on accounts 10 ; chairman 462 

Appointed: committee on water 11 : pay of laborers 22; 250th 

anniversary 239 
Remaiks : 

Old State House 17 

Protection of cemeteries 20 

Street en 

Pay of laborers 21, 106, 409 

Waste of water 49, 66, 603 

1 1. i oration day 55 

Public library 67 

New main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir 86, 123, 130, 309, 370 

Extension of Broadway b0, 167, 382 
Bridge to Charleston 

New court-house l 1 <~ 
Superintendent of public lands 136 
Improved sewerage 148 

Sale of public lands 166 

Appropriation bill 185 

Carson's excavating machine 200, 224 

Care of hydrants 207 

Public parks 237, 238 

Owners of nest Koxbury park 239 

Faneuil Hall portraits 249 

Stony brook 319 

Barrel WagODS 338 

Lay ing of water-pipes 396 

Accounts of late treasurer of Brighton 405 

260th anniversary 43H, 438, 450 

Water-supply for Cambridge 608 

Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Com pan] 
ration of council chamber 632 
Committee on legislative matters 540, 561, 579 

Increase of police force b< 

Revision Of the ordinances 843, 653 
Additional water-basin 646 

Yt riflcation by auditor of payment of interest and bonds 647 
Improved sewerage, modification of contract 674 
Greenville street — 

Boundary line between land of Isaac F. Cruft and burial 
uiid, petition a 13!) ; leave to withdraw a 198, C 200 
Greenwich place .ward 24) — 

Sewer : petition a 2.jb : report and order of notice a 282 ; hearing 
'7 ; order passed 317 
Greenwood avenue (ward i3) — 

Sewer : petition a 568 
Gregg, Washington P. — 

elected clerk of common council 3 
Griffin, James II. — 

nitcl superintendent of West Koxbury scales a 189 
Griffin, Martin — 

Appointed inspector of milk a 59 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXIX 



Griffith, Henry — 

Appointed field-driver and pound keeper a 214, c 222 
Griggs, John II. — ■ 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Griggs, Robert D. et al. — 

Jenkins st. (S.B.), edgestones, petition a 425 
Grogan, Richard — 

Beacon St., injury to carriage, petition a 543, c 548; leave to 
withdraw a 650, c 652 
Groom, Thomas, et al. — 

Humphrey street, grading, etc., petition a 26 
Grose, Joseph It. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Grove street (ward 23) — 

Lamps : petition a 456 
Grover, Lurana A. — 

Cambridge st., widening at Charlestown, $109.08 damages a 415 
Gnradel, Hermann — 

Petition to be appointed superintendent of common and public 
grounds a 26 
Guild, GeorueB. & Co.— 

From Monument sq. (ward 23) to Allandale Springs, passenger 
wagons, petition a 327 ; permit 352 
Guild, George K. — 

Mt. Vernon st. (ward 23) , edgestones, petition a 189; order 
passed a 212 
Guild, James, et al. — 

Washingtonst. between Cliffand Cedarjsts., sprinkling, petition 
a £30 
Gunning, John — 

229 Cabot St., edgestones, order passed a 500 

H street — 

Sidewalks : Union institution for savings, No. 200, order passed 
a 458 
No. 202, order passed a 458 
Corner Ninth St., order passed a 458 
Edgestoues : between Seventh and Eighth sts., petition a 518 
Hackett, LeKoy — 

Union park, declaration respecting deed a 306 
Hackett, Matthew — 

Movement of wooden building from Western av., rear North 
Harvard St., to North Harvard St. (rear) near Western av. 
(ward 25) , permit a 416 
Hadley, lienjamin — 

Cambridge St. (Charlestown), $91.60 for land a 246 
Hagar, J. B., councilman (ward 10) — 
Qualified 337 

Appointed : committee on claims 348, legislative matters 348 
Remarks : 

Law department 394 
Reducing motions to writing 420 
Public parks 529 
Inspection of vinegar 578 
Committee on legislative matters 579 
Death of councilman Perkins 633 
Hagarty, Rose — 

Pay of sum due Daniel Hagarty deceased a 665, c 670 
Haines, J. II. — 

Rear Townsend St., stable, petition a 514; permit 534 
Hale, George, et al. — ■ 

Cazenove pi., sewer, petition a 109 
Hale, Robert — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Haley, John I. — 

Warwick st. (ward 19), stable, petitiona365; leave to withdraw 
429 
Hall, Alfred A.— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Hall, Edward D., agent, et al. — 

Centre and Pond sts., sewer, petition, request for special com- 
mittee, leave to withdraw a 333 
Hall, Hay ward P.— 

79 Northampton St., stable, petition a 480 ; permit 500; cellar, 
petition a 514 ; permit 519 
Hall, Joseph E. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161, a 175, c 182 
Dorchester av., at Milton Lower Mills, edgestones, petition a 258 
Hall, Joseph E. et al. — 

Dorchester av., at Milton Lower Mills, grading, petition a 276 
Hall. Joseph P.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Hall, Robert W.— 

Nominated and elected superintendent of public lands a 63, 
c 87, a 93, 110, c 122, a 125, c 136, a 139 
Hall, Thomas- 
Appointed constable a 456 
Ilallahan, Ann, trustee — 

Commercial st., widening, $3850 damages a 46 
Halleck, T. E.— 

East Sixth st. (ward 14), wooden building, petition a 327, 
c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 
Hallen, A. — 

22 North Mead st. (ward 4) , stable, petition a 297 
Hallock street — 

Grade damages : petition a 551 



Ham, Benjamin A. et al. — 

West Seventh st. between Dorchester and F sts., petition to put 
in order a 456 
Ham, Joseph, et al. — 

Monument at Fort Lot, Highlands, petition c 322; referred to 
Boston water board c 346, a 349 
Ham & Carter — 

Movement of wooden building from Northampton st. to 728 
Albany st. (ward 18), petition a 586; permit 650 
Ham & Viles— 

20 and 22 Lynde st. (ward 7), stable, petition a 543; report 590 
Hamblin, Howard M. — 

255 Tremont st., lantern, petition a 174 ; permit a 197 
Hamilton, Alonzo, el al. — 

Lawrence av. (ward 24), lamps, petition a 77 

Grading, etc., petition a 77 
Hamilton, Edward — 

Providing free soup, petition a 613, c 621 
Hamlet street (ward 20) — ■ 

Lamps : petition a 543 
Hammond, Joseph, et al. — 

New Lamartine St., sewer, petition a 568; order notice 617; 
hearing 629 
Hampden street — 

Telegraph poles : a 535 

No. 57, removal, petition a 629 
Hampshire street — 

Movement of wooden building from, petition a 124 ; permit 
a 145 

From 87 and 89, petition a 258 

Sewer : damages, petition a 468, c 475 ; leave to withdraw a 589, 
c601 
Hancock, Martin M., councilman (ward 1) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on East Boston ferries 11; police 11; 
surveyor's department 11, resigned 348 ; public buildings 
348 

Elected : director of East Boston ferries a 29, c 31, 55 

Remarks : 

Salaries of city officers 150 
Increase of police force 536 
Hancock Square (Charlestown) — 

Passenger wagon to harbor boats, petition a 400 ; permit 415 
Hancock street — 

Plank walks, etc.; petition a 349 

Sidewalks: at 12 & 14, petition a 413; order passed 447 
Hancock street (Charlestown) — 

Sewer : petition a 414 ; order for hearing 415 ; hearing 426 ; order 
passed 429 
Hancock street (Dorchester) — 

Sidewalks, etc. a 59 

Stable : petition a 456 ; permit 467 

Turnout: petition a 518; order notice 534; hearing 56S ; order 
passed 589 

Crosswalks : near Winter st., petition a 568 
Foot of Trull st. , report a 574 
Hannum, James \V. et al. — 

Walnut st. near Neponset av. (ward 24), edgestones, petition 
a 586 
Hanover street — 

Claims : personal injuries c 18, a 26, c 137, a 139, 297, c 307 

Druggist's mortar: Blackstone bank building a 327, 352 
Harbor — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Defences, topic in mayor's address referred a 44, c 50 ; commit- 
tee c 52 

Harbor master appointed a 83 

Harbor master for Roxbury canal a 96, 280, c 283 

Harbor master's office a 158, c 160, 187 

Request for report respecting steamboats c 3S2, a 383, c 461, 
a 465 

Loading vessels on the Sabbath a 93, 402, c 405 

Discharging cargo a 467, c 475, a 480 

Charles-river fiats, Cambridge, notice of hearing c 635 
Harding, Albert E 

374 Marlborough st. , edgestoues, petition a 443; order passed 
458 
Harding, C. P — 

54 Clifford st., sidewalk, petition a 3S3; order passed 404 
Hargrave, George W. — 

Movement of wooden building from 248 Princeton st. to 232 
Bennington St., petition a 155; permit a 179 
Harkins, Timothy — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Cougress-st. bridge a 3S8 
Harrigan, Jeremiah — 

Appointed deputy sealer of weights and measures a 109 
Harrington, John C. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Harris, Charles — 

Nominated and elected superintendent of streets a 63, c 87 
Harris, Thomas B — 

Nominated and elected sinking-fund commissioner a 212, c 222 
Harris aven tie (Jamaica Plain) — 

Telegraph posts a 109, 127 
Harrison avenue — 

Claims : personal injuries c 57, a 59 



XXX 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Land, corner Beach St., sale authorized a 85, 95, c99; change 
in terms of sale B 414, c 418 ; order passed a 472, c 475 

Stable: between Washington, Essex and Beach sts., petition 
a 189; leave to withdraw 402 

Sprinkling: from Warren to Eustls sts., ]>etition a 213 
" Portion " : order passed a 248 

Excavating cellar, corner Beach st., petition a 349; permit 402 

Savage primary school-house and land, sale authorized c 411, 

a 418 

Wooden building: movement from No. 404, petition a 443; per- 
mit 456 
Paving: between East Newton st. and East Chester park, order 

passed a 
Widening : damages a 482 
Retaining wall : at 904-912, petition a 518 
Telegraph poles : a 534 
Sidewalk : No. 1141, petition B 

Tracks : connection with Beach-st. track, permit a G18 
Hart, Elizabeth M.— 

Cedar Bt. (Charlestown), edgestoncs, petition a 327; order 
] ias -cd 3i0 
Hart, Thomas N., councilman (ward 18) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Elected : finance committee 7 

Appointed : committee On city registrar's department 11 

Treasury department 11 
Remarks : 

Appropriation bill 185 
Public parks 606, 528, 510 
Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Company 627 
Treasury department 542 
Hart, Patrick- 
Dorchester district, license to sprinkle certain streets, petition 

; permit a 127 
Appointed public weigher a 26, 125 
Hartford. Lliza A. — 

64 Gates St. (S.B.), abatement of sidewalk assessment, petition 
B 26 ; permit a 65 
Hartford & Co, it ah— 

Certain wooden buildings, petition c 636, a 663 
Hartman. John — 

Ward st., sewer, abatement a 446 
Hartnctt, John — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Ilartwell, Daniel G.— 

Faiieuil Hall market, transfer of stall 24 and cellar No. 8 a 416 
Harvard avenue (ward 25) — 
Lamp, petition a 124 

Harvard avenue (ward 5) — 

Grade : petition a 433 
Harvard street — 

Petition to put in order a 59 

Lantern : at '.'4, petition ■ 241 ; permit 281 

Paving : petition a 3^3 
Harvey, Marj — 

169 Be icon st. rear, personal injuries, petition c 671, a 676 
Harvey , Stephen W. — 

128 Bonier St., erection of wooden building, petition a 465, 
c 475; report c 626, b 
Harwich street— 

Sewer : petition and order of notice I 

Between Dartmouth and Yarmouth sts., permit to close 
a 467 
Hastings, A. IV. < l ah— 

Poplar st. (ward 23), gravelling, etc., petition a 59 
Hastings .v Co. et ah — 

Corner Lincoln and Beach sts., telegraph pole, petition a 551 
HaSting8, John — 

Release refused a 472 
Hatch, Horace N.— 

Congress it., damages, petition c 120, a 125 
Hathaway, J. A. — 

Rockland st. ( Brighton), sidewalk, petition a 465 ; order passed 
483 
Hathorne, J. 11.— 

Abatement of nuisance on premises, petition a 383, c 390; re- 
port a 547, C 54s 

Injuries to coach, leave to withdraw a 587, c 601 
Hathorne, J. II. & I. J.— 

Salem Bt, to Sullivan sq. (Charlestown), extension of omnibus 
route, petition a 450; referred to next board of aldermen 700 
Haven, Franklin, ft ah trustee: — 

Assigns of Boston Water Power Co. — see Boston Water Power 
Co. 
Havey, Daniel — 

Pj ncbon st. (ward 21), stable, petition a 213 
Havey, Peter — 

Dudley av. (ward 23) , stable, petition a 499; permit 515 
Havey, Thomas, et ah — 

292 and 1!'U Bolton st., grade damages, petition a 425; order 
passed 55S 
Havre street — 

Vacant land, nuisance, c 123, a 125, c 188, a 189 

Sidewalk.- : between Brooks and Porter sts.. petition a 436 

No. 201, petition a 51*:; order passed 574 

No. l'J'J, petition a 518; order passed 574 



Ilawes, Albert O. — 

Appointed superintendent Granite bridge a 126 
Hay- 
Inspectors and weighers of bundle hay, appointments a 83, 125, 
155, 400 
Hayden, Charles — 

Nominated and elected director for public institutions a 175, 
c 187, 201, a 211, 214, c 222 
Haves, John E. et ah — 

Chelsea st. (Charlestown), sewer, petition a 213 
llay market square — 

PaS8enger wagon — see Omnibuses 

Middlesex K. Co., cross-connection, petition a 456 
Haj nes, Edward, t I al. — 

I airfield st., trees, petition a 518, c 523 
Haynes, Ellen — 

118 Hudson st.. personal injuries, petition a 174, c 181; leave to 
withdraw a 646, C 548 
llaviii & Son — 

Washington Bt., near Richmond St. (ward 24), stable, petition 
■ 827 ; permit 350 
HayneS, Henry Bt. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Ha\ lies, 'filly — 

■teach st.. United States hotel, lamp-posts, petition a 258; 
report a 281 
Hayward place — 

Projection of lantern a 213, 246 
Ha] ward street — 

Estate of I). II. McKay, edgestoncs, sidewalks a 198 
Petition a 518 ; order passed a 546 
Health- 
Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Topics in ma] art address referred c 39, a 44 

Health wagons for ward 25 c 32, a 43 

James M. Keith appointed member of board of health a 125, 
c 131, 147 

Milk— see Milk 

Passage-ways in rear of Trcmont St., petition to put in healthy 
condition 

Bay of deceased employe c 095, a 700 

-t Boston, beuse offal, contract authorised a 6 '5, a 700 
Intramural interments c 6, a 13, c 154, a 166, <■ 186, a l-!t 
Statistics of New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore a 15, c 16, 

a 26, 156, c 160 
East Boston cemetery c 21. a 26 
Public urinals c 26, a26, c 13S, 147, a 156, c 160, a 329, 402, 

c 406, a 414, c 416, a 425, c 430, a 547, c 549 
Additional appropriations— see Appropriations 
Nuisance near Kederal-st. bridge c 123, a 126, 199, 247, c 347 
Nuisance on vacant lands in East Bo-tou c 123, a 125, c 188, 

b 189 

Medicines for the poor c 173, a 174, c 239, a 243 

South-bay nuisance c 324, a 829, 402, 8 406, a 415, c 419, 479, 

a 480, 547, c 548 
Annual report of board of health a 383 
Newton-st. passage-way a 467 
Superintendent authorized to purchase horses, supplies, etc. 

c 41,55, a 59 
Street crossings c 20, a 28, e 40, a 43 
Ash carts c 137, a 139, c 188, a 189 
Pay of deceased emplo] e a 212. c 220. 232, a 406, c 475 
House offal in West Roxburj c 228, a 243 
New sheds c 240, 250, a 258 
Telephonic communication a 265, c 268 
Sweeping-machines c 295, a 2'.'7 
Back-bay nuisance c 882, a 883. 408, e 406 
Hospital on Fort avenue— see Hospitals 

Heal] , John P. — 

Nominated and elected city solicitor a 64, c 87 
Sec also Law department 
llealv. .1. P., A. N. Whiting and .1 . F. Fuller, trustees — 
Lincoln st., widening, $1447.50 damages a -' •" 
1 --ex st., extension from South to Federal sts., $400 damages 
a 429 
Healy, .Joseph, councilman (ward 10) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on claims 11. legislative matters 11, 
topics in mayor's inaugural address 12, celebration of 250th 
anoiversai 
Remarks : 

Street and health departmen' 
New court-house 42, 107 
Harbor defenci 
Public library 66 

department 68 
Citj officers opposing legislation 92, 206 
Member of board of health 132 
Salaries of city officers 149 
Appropriation bill 183 
Decease 218 
Heaney, Thomas, and Ellen Fagan — 

2'J2 and 2J4 Bolton St., grade damages, petition a 425 
Heaphy, r. — 

pointed assistant superintendent of Mt. Washington-av. 
bridge a 388 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXXI 



Heath place — 

Grading : petition a 13 
Heath street (ward 23)— 

Stable : petition a 43 ; permit a 65 

Plank walk, etc. : petition a 43, 241 

Sewer : petition a 543 
Hebard, Sylvester II.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
Heidenreich, Emil — 

73 Cedar St., tree, petition a 230; permit a 265 
Heintz, John — 

Appointed undertaker a 189 
Henchman street — 

Altering grade, damages a 84 

Wooden buildings : movement from 29 to 7, petition a 297 
From 450 Commercial st. to 7 Henchman, petition a 297 

Sewer : petition a 499 : order passed 500 
Henderson, A. D. — 

Appointed superintendent Western-av. bridge to Watertown 
and North Beacon-st. bridge a 126 
Henley street — 

Paving a 93 
Hereford street — 

Edgestones, sidewalk: corner Marlborough St., petition a 209 ; 
order passed a 248 
Corner Beacon st., petition a 276; order passed 317 
Ilersey, Charles II. and Francis 0. — 

Grade damages, order to pay a 29 
Ilersey, Charles W. et al. — 

Dorchester st., from Broadway to Eighth St., sprinkling, petition 
a 241 
Herter, Robert — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Hertkorn, Joseph — 

179 West Seventh st., sidewalks, petition a 413; order passed 
447 
Ilewins, George — 

291 and 293 Commercial st., steam engine, petition and order for 
hearing a 468 ; hearing 514 ; permit 519 
Hewitt & Webster- 
Rockland St., sidewalks, petition a 297 ; order passed 317 
Hickey, Richard, et al. — 

Back street, grading, etc., petition a 20 
Hicks, William L. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Higgins, Daniel — 

Appointed surveyor of marble, soapstone and freestone a 125 ; 
inspector of lime a 214, c 222 
Higgins, L. II. — 

Claim for damage to wagon, petition c 295; leave to withdraw 
c 347, a 349 
Higgins, R. R. et al.— 

Ridgeway lane, paving, petition a 400 
High street — 

Steam engine : 173 Chadwick Lead Works, petition and orderof 
notice a 13 ; hearing a 59 ; permit a 84 

Vacant land, sale authorized a 143 
High street, Charlestown — 

Vacant land, sale authorized, a 143 

Sewer : petition a 586 ; order notice 617 ; hearing 629 
Highland park — see Common, etc. 
Highland park street — 

Estate, damages a 124 
Highland street — 

Sprinkling : petition a 213 

" Portion," order passed a 248 

Tree : removal, petition a 48U ; report 558 
Highland street Railway Co.— 

Steam engine, etc., at 824 Shawmut av., petition and order of 
notice a 126 ; hearing 174 ; permit 246 

Coaches: between Forest Hills station (W.R.) and Mt. Hope 
cemetery, and between Grove Hall and Mt. Hope cemetery, 
petition a 276, permit 299 

Self-propelling engine a 95, 127 

Geneva av., petition to put in order a 443 
Hill & Wright— 

137, 139, Sumner st., E.B., engine and boiler, petition a 258 ; 
hearing 314; permit 335 
Hill, George — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall No. 103 and cellar No. 20, 
a 558 
Hill, L. M.T. etal.— 

Howard av. between Hartford and Sargent sts., lamps, petition 
a 551 
Ilillard, James L. — 

Appointed assistant clerk of committees a 189, c 200 

Extra services, order passed c 692 
Hills, George H. — 

Appointed public weigher a 314 
Bills, Thomas — 

Nominated assessor c 92 ; elected a 93, c 99 
Bills, Thomas, et al. — 

II st. between Seventh and Eighth sts., edgestones, petition 
a 518 
Hilton, John P., councilman (ward 5) — 

Oaths of office 1 



Appointed : committee on salaries 11 ; survey and inspection of 
buildings 11 ; new bridge to Charlestown 21 

Elected : trustee of City hospital a 29, c 31, a 230, c 232 

Remarks : 

Salaries of city officers 149 
Salary supt. north draw Chelsea bridge 548 
Hinckley, Jane E. — 

453 Washington St., personal injuries, petition a 213, c 220 
Hinckley, Ayres & Co. — 

New Faneuil Hall market, transfer of cellar No. 5, repovt in 
favor a 471 
Hingham street : 

Sidewalk : corner Middlesex St., petition a 241 
Hobbs, J. S. & Co. etal.— 

Running empty cars around block enclosed by Kneeland, 
South, Beach and Federal sts., petitiou a 174; order of 
notice a 198 ; hearing a 241 
Hoblitzell, Condon & Uoblitzell— 

Payment of $3000, retained on contract a 94, c 99 
Plodgate, John M. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Ilogan, John J.— 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Holbrook, Anthony, et al. — 

East Ninth st., paving, petitiou a 327 
Holbrook, Jesse — 

Woodbine St., sidewalks, petition a 124 
Holbrook street — 

Sewer : petition a 468 ; remonstrance 499 
Holden, Artemas R. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 

Kennard av. , sewer, assessment a 335 
Holden, Geor?e, heirs of— 

Commercial St., widening, $112 damages a 366 
Holden court — 

Estate, damages a 63 

Lamp : petition a 586 
Holland, D. J.— 

Supt. Mt. Washington-av. bridge, petitions in favor c 136, 
a 142 ; elected c 149, a 156 
Holland, Sarah E. et al. — 

Beach St., land damages, petition a 276; order passed a 446 
Holland, W. A.— 

Compensation for land, petition a 26; order to pay a 197 
Hollis, George W., councilman ( ward 25) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on fire department 11 ; water 11; cheap 
po.--tage 16 . . 

Hollis, George W.— 

North Beacon st. (Brighton District), temporary bridge to ice- 
house a 127 
Hollis, G. vV\— 

Corner Brighton av. and Market st. (ward 25), stable, petition 
a 499 ; permit 515 

North Beacon St. (ward 25), stable, petition a 499; permit 515 

Market st. (ward 25), stable, petition a 543; permit 558 
Hollis, John, et al. — 

Brighton av., crossing, petition a 454; report 467 
Hollis, John W. et al. — 

Brighton av., macadamizing, petition a 59 
Holly, Joseph — 

Appointed public weigher a 314 
Holly, Richard — 

Kennard av., sewer, $3.89 abatement a 212 
Holmes, Eliza A. — ■ 

Leverett St., personal injuries, petition a 258, c 268; leave to 
withdraw a 352, c 354 
Holmes, John— 

699 Washington St., projection of lantern, petition a 213; per- 
mit a 246 
Holmes, R. — 

Heath st., plank walk, etc., petition a 241 
Holmes, Richard, et al. — 

Heath st., plank walk, etc., petition a 43 
Holmes (F. M.) Furniture Co. — 

Street leading from Maiden bridge to Everett line, petition to 
put in order a 456 
Holtzer, F. W. H — 

Spring Lane (W.R.), sewer, $3.26 abatement a 472 
Home Savings Hank — 

Blue Hill av., relocation, $120 damages a 159 
Hoops and staves — 

Culler appointed a 214, c 222 
Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator Co. — 

63 Water st. (ward 5), woodeu building, petition a 629, c 635 
Hosea, Samuel, jr. — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 ; weigher of coal 
a 365 
Hosley, Henry E., couucilman (ward 15) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on City hospital 11 ; public library 11 

Remarks : 

Revised ordinances 656 
Hospitals— 

City Hospital — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 



XXXII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Topics in mayor's address referred c "9, a 44 
Amendments to ordinance a 216, c220, 363, a 383 
Trustees : nominated <• 18, a 29: elected a 29, c 31 
Incorporation <• 41, a 43, c 60, 71, 87,100, a 110 
Appointments a 213, c 222, a 241, c 249, a 276, c 292 
Trustees on part of city council, request to nominate a 

216, c 22U : election a 230, c 232 
Organization 244 
A nnual report c 373 
Non-paying patients a 413, c 418 
Ambulance for Bast Boston c 47s, a 481, c 604, a 613 
Additional land a 519, c 523,584, 605, a 613, 630, c 635, 

686, a 663, c 670, a 676 
Contagions diseases, petition a 155, c 160; leave to with- 
draw a 19S, c 200 
Iron fencing : order passed a 558, c 560,578 
Visitors on Sundays c 669, a 508, c 583,605 
St. Elizabeth's hospital, 7S Waltham st., petition for release 
of condition on estate a S14 
F'ort av., sewer, petition a 414, 425 ; order for hearing 415 ; 
Ilea ring 426 

hospital, remonstrance a 414 ; report 547 ; order pi 
a 091 ; purchase a 517, c 648, a 651, 554, c 559, 565 
a 676, 590, c 601, 618, 670, 694, a 700 
Houghton, J. V. it <il. — 

Green -t., crossing at Call st., petition a 241 
llovev, George E. tt al. — 

Dudley st., crosswalk, petition a 109 
Hovev, Solon, on, jr. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Howard, Albert, tt al.— 

North av.. grading, petition a 209 
Howard, John — 

Elected BUpt. Maiden bridge c 148, a 156 
Howard, I.. S. 1 1 al. — 

Lincoln st. (ward 24), sower, petition a 230 
Howard, W. II. tt al.- 

Sullivan gq sprinkling, petition a 258; leave to withdraw 
a 888, <• 390 
Howard, William [I., councilman (ward 4) — 

Oath of office 1 

Appointed committee on streets 11; water 11 
Howard avenue (ward 20) — 

Stable: petition a 414; leave to withdraw 467 

Lamps : between Hartford and Sargent sts., petition a 551 
Howard street — 

Coaches a 69, 94 
Howard street ward 20) — 

Stable : petition a 213 

Wooden building: moving across street, permit a 248 

Globe Nail Co., gas pipe, petition a 207 ; permit 317 

Edge-tones, sidewalks, paving, from Hampden to Gerard sts., 
order passed a 350 
Howe, N. li. — 

117 Zeigler st.. removal of telegraph pole, petition a 676 
Howes, Osborne, jr. ft al. — 

Hancock st., foot of Trull St., crosswalk, report a 574 
Howland, A. M. et al. — 

Melville av.. sewer, petition a 414; order of notice 415; hearing 
426 : Older passed 446 
Lamps: petition a 468 
Howland, J. F.— 

Richmond st (ward 24), stable, petition a 480 ; permit 500 
Howland, .J. F. <l al. — 

Richmond st. (Dorchester), edgestones, gutters, petition a 77 
Howland street — 

Sidewalks, grading a 124 

Grading, gravelling, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, order 

passed a 281 

Edgestones, sidewalks : abatements and assessments a 546 
Ilowson, John, it id. — 

Allston, playground, petition a 365, e 370 
Hovt, .lames A.— 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Dover-st. bridge a 388 
Hubbard & lilake— 

Alford st. (ward 4), wooden building, petition c 565, a 568 
Hudson street — 

Crosswalk: petition a 43; permit a 65 

Claims: personal injuries, petition a 174, c 181; leave to with- 
draw ;i 646, c 548 
Hughes, Peter .1 — 

Constable, bond approved a 46 
Hull, Harriet K. et u/.- 

Parker st. (Charlestown), sewer, petition a 456 
Hull, Livcrus — 

Nominated and elected overseer of poor a 144, c 147, 172 
Humphrey street — 

Grading, etc, a 26 

Watering : petition a 230 

" Portion," order passed a 248 
Humphries, Richard »'. and J. Frank Pope, receivers of Dorchester 
Savings Bank — 

Adams st., relocation, $52.50 damages a 94 
HUIII eteld, c. — 

115 West Seventh St., sidewalks, petition a 174 ; report and or- 
der a 198 



IluDneman, Mrs. J. F. Q. — 

11 Mt. Pleasant, av. (ward 20), wooden building, petition a 327, 
e 337 : permit a 860, c 354 
Ilunneman, John II. tt al. — 

Washington St., grading, preservation of trees, petition a 241 
Ilunneman, Joseph II. — 

Washington st., widening, $6000 damages a 94 
Hunneman street — 

Telegraph poles a 468 
Huniiewell, II. II., attorney- 
State and Washington sts., grade of sidewalk, petition a 155; 
permit 3ss 
Hunnewell, John et al. — 

Perkins st. (Charlestown), lamps, petition a 465 
Hunt, Charles — 

Neponsel av. near Chickatawbut St., edgestones, report and or- 
der a 179 
Hunt, \V. I'. ital — 

Grampian way, grading, etc., petition a 77 
Huntington, E. II. M. — 

Green st (ward 2:',), between Forest Hills and Washington sts., 

grading, petition a 213 
Forest Hills St., corner (Jreen st., edgestones, petition a 400; or- 
der passed 416 
Huntington avenue — 

Crosswalk : petition a 77 

Prom Albany bridge to West Chester park, use as trotting 
ground, petitiou a 124 
Sprinkling: from Clarendon st. to West Chester park a 199 
Tracks : to West Chester park a 276 
Bridge repairs a 403 

Extension to Parker st. : communication from street commis- 
sioners referred a 443, c 455 
Parcel of land between West Newton st. and P. & A. railroad, 
notice from lioston Water Power Co. c 121, a 426 j order 
referred a 471, c 475; report, order passed c 490, 504, a 514 
Hunton & Co. — 

Tamworth St., pipe, petition a 425; permit 447 
Iluse, Mary E. B.— 

Walnut St. near N'eponset av., edgestones, petition a 413 ; or- 
der passed 447 
Huston, C. B. — 

Washington st. near Leland place, box and sign, petition a 189 
HntchingSj William X.etal. — 

Craw lor l st., petition to put in order a 97 
Hutchins, Luther — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Hutchins, Oriel M. — 

Appointed weigher of coal and measurer of wood and bark a297 
Hutchinson, J. II. — 

Mercantile market, enclosing sheds, petition a 649, c 652 
Hyde Park avenui — 
Plank walk a 43 

Between Walkhil) and Ashland sts., sidewalks, etc. a 93 
Poles: between Walk Hill St. and Hyde Park line, permit a 631 
Hyde street (Dorchester) — 

Claims: John White, damages for death of sou, petition a 456, 
c 460; leave to withdraw a 646, c 648 

Ice — 

Weighing ice a 458, c 460, 476, a 480 
Idiotic school, trustees of — see Mass. Institute for F'eeble-mindcd 

Youth 
India street — 

From custom house to Atlantic av., paving a 59 

Petroleum etc. : No. 33, license a PJ7 
No. 43, license 
India wharf, proprietors of — 

268 and 257 Atlantic av., sidewalks, petition a 276 ; order passed 
317 
Ingalls, Frederick P. — 

Appointed constable a 456 

Inquirer publishing company — 

Leave to hire licensed minors a 176 

Inspection of buildings — see Buildings 

Inspectors of elections- 
Appointed a 481, 486,499,514,618,688 

Institute of Technology — 

Newbury st., sidewalk, petition a 349; order passed 430 
Of drill hall, order passed a 665 
Institutions, public — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Nomination and election of directors a 29, c 31, a 44, c 55, a 63, 

145, 169, c 222 
Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 

Charlestown almshouse a 28, e 73. a 77. c 172, a 281, c 283, 
a 297, 4S2, c 4S7, 504, a 514. C 673, a 676 

Austin farm buildings— see Appropriations 

Investigation of death of Joseph Kennev c 171, a 175, C 188, 202, 

a 211, c 312, a 314 
Organization of directors a 244 
Committee authorized to investigate applications for release 

a 317 
Annual report c 342 
Truants and absentees from school a 401, C 405, 411, a 415, 

c 420, a 426, c 476, a 480 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXXIII 



Marcella-st. home a 404, c 405, a 415 
Petitions for pardon : 

Matthew Geary, referred a 299: release on probation 317 

Mary Gillespie, release on probation a 317 

Andrew Anderson, release refused a 350 

Thomas Alexander, release refused a 388 

Timothy Kane, release granted a 444 

John Hastings, release refused a 472 

Thomas F. Callahan, conditional release on probation a 501 

Eliza McGinnis, release granted a 519 

Warren A. Pollard, release refused a 416 

David F. Keating, release granted a 591 

Maria Duereaux, release granted a 614 

James H. Mansfield, release granted a 649 
Neglected children a 586, c 601 , a 687, c 693, a 700 
Transfer of powers to overseers of poor c 671, a 676 
Semi-annual reports of visiting committee — see County of 

Suffolk 



Jackson, James — 

Bear 347 Beacon St., stable, remonstrance a 613 
Jackson, Thomas A. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Jackson avenue — 

Steps : pay for building a 688 
Jacobs, David H. & Son — 

Jackson av.. Lime alley, passage-way leadiug to Commercial St., 
$427.18 for building steps, order passed a 688 
Jacobs, Neil, heirs of — 

North sq., sewer, abatement a 47 
Jacobs, William, heirs of — 

Adams St., relocation, $66.40 damages a 97 
Jakober, Annie — 

1502 Washington st., tree-box, petition a 174 
Jamaica Plain Gas Light Co. — 

Contract authorized a 352 
Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Co. — 

Supply by city, order of inquiry, c 490, a 499; report c 426, 
a 533 

Purchase of franchise, petition c 565, a 568 
Jamaica street- 
Sewer : abatement a 98 
James, George — 

Appointed superintendent of TYest Roxbury scales a 189 
James, George, et al. — 

Seaverns av., sidewalk, remonstrance a 456: leave to withdraw 
467 
Jarves, Benjamin, et al. — 

Fourth St., paving, petition a 43 
Jeffries, Samuel T. jr. et al. — 

Dorchester av., from Field's corner to dividing line between 
wards 24 and 15, sprinkling, petition a 213 
Jeffries point (ward 2) — 

Stable : petition a 442 ; permit 446 
Jeffries street — 

Stable : petition a 456 ; permit 467 
Jelly, Edward — 

Personal injuries, petition c 32, a 43 
Jenkins street (S.B.) — 

Edgestones ; petition a 425 
Jenks, Thomas L. — 

Nominated and elected director of East Boston ferries a 29, c 31, 
55, 147, a 156 
Jenks, Thomas L. et al. — 

Spring st., paving, petition a 468 
Jenness, R. H. — 

26 Mather St., sidewalk, petition a 425; order passed 447 
Jenney, B. & Co. et al. — 

First st., from B to E sts., sprinkling, petition a 213 
Jenney, Stephen & Co. — 

2 Central wharf, petroleum and coal oils, renewal of license 
. a 197 

Second st., same a 197 
Jess street — 

Grading, gravelling, edgestones, gutters, order passed a 430 
Jessop, James — 

Bowdoin st. near Colony st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 124 
Jewett, Nathaniel M. et al.— 

Certain streets in East Boston, substitution of gas lamps for 
oil lamps, petition a 465 
Joaquin & Cie — 

32 Temple place, canvas sign, petition a 468; report referred 
a 630 
Johnson, Charles P. — 

Appointed constable a 591 
Johnson, C. S. et al. — 

Parker st (Charlestown), sewer remonstrance a 327 
Johnson, Daniel, et al. — 

Park and Adams sts. (Charlestown), petition against tracks 

Johnson, II. IT. et al.— 

Linden st. between Adams and Commercial sts. (ward 24) sower, 

petition a 124; report and order of notice 144; hearing 155; 

order passed 350 
Linden st., macadamizing, etc., petition a 383 



Johnson, John M. — 

Appointed superintendent of South Boston scales a 189 
Johnson, J. W. et al. — 

Brattle sq. paving, petition a 349 ; order passed a 367 
Johnson J. W. & Co.— 

Corner Brattle st. and Brattle sq., street lamp, petition a 400, 
425 ; permit 467 
Jones, Edward J. — 

Appointed police commissioner a 155 ; confirmed a 155, c 161 
Jones, F. et al. — 

Union avenue, petition to put in order a 59 
Jones, Joseph — 

$266.66 for services as assistant supt. north draw Chelsea 
bridge a 587, c 601 
Jones, Leander E. H. — 

Pleasant st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 468 ; permit 483 

Pleasant St., sidewalk, petition a 518 
Jones, Leander H. — 

Pleasant st. (ward 24), between Pond and Pearl sts., sewer, 
petition a 241, hearing 276 
Jones, L. H. et al. — 

Pleasant st. (Dorchester), edgestones, gutters, macadamizing, 
petition a 241 
Jones, Silas E. et al. 

Corner Eustis and Prescott sts., crosswalk, petition a 124 
Jones, William K. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Jordan, Eben D. et al.- — 

Increase of light in street lamps, petition a 109 ; report 665 
Jordan, E. D. — 

Street roar of 46 Beacon st., stable, petition a 414 
Jordan, Marsh & Co.— 

Between Washington st., Harrison av., Essex and Beach sts., 
stable, petition a 139 ; leave to withdraw 402 

Crossing opposite 55 Bedford st., petition a 189 

Avon place, steam pipe, petition a 543 ; permit 558 

St. Elizabeth's hospital estate, petition in favor of purchase 
a 551, c 559 
Jordan, Eben D., and Charles Marsh — 

Bedford st., widening, $204 damages a 429 
Joy, George M. — 

Centre St., personal injuries, damages to horses and wagon, pe- 
tition c 476, a 480 
Joy, John D. W. — 

Corner Harrison av. and Beach St., excavating cellar, petition 
a 349 ; permit 402 

Corner Beach st. and Harrison av., terms of sale of land, peti- 
tion a 414, c 418 ; order passed a 472, c 475 
Joyce, John — 

Personal injuries on new sewer in South Boston, petition a 365, 
c 370 ; leave to withdraw a 690, c 692 
Judiciary — 

Standing committee of common council c 11 
Judkins, Ella F. — 

209 K St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 668 



K street — 

Crosswalks : petition a 230 

Edgestones, sidewalks : No. 211, petition a 568 
No. 209, petition a 568 
Kaan, Gr. et al. — 

New Seaver St., edgestones, petition a 109 
Kallea, Michael J.— 

77 Baxter st. , edgestones, petition a 568 
Kallman, Marcus — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Kane, Daniel F. — 

83 Baxter St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 543 ; order passed 
558 
Kane, Timothy — 

Release granted a 444 
Kearns, John — 

Liquor license forfeited, leave to withdraw a 64, c 66 
Keating, David F. — 

Release granted a 591 
Keith, David B.— 

Appointed constable a 400, 481 ; bond approved 415 
Keith, Edward L. — 

Bellevue St., removal of tree, petition a 241, c 249 ; report and 
reference a 280 
Keith, F. A.— 

193 Blue Hill av., edgestones, petition a 297 ; order passed 317 
Keith, James M. — 

Appointed member of board of health a 125, c 131, 147 
Keith, R. F.— 

Appointed measurer of upper leather a 189 
Kelley, Ann — 

202 II st., sidewalk, order passed 458 
Kelley, Ellen— 

17 Telegraph St., sidewalk, petition a 518 
Kelley, Hannah — 

3S0 West Second st., sidewalk, petition a 465; order passed 500 
Kellv, Henry — 

1141 Harrison av., 16 Taber st., 23 Palmer St., sidewalks, peti- 
tion a 586 



XXXIV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Kellcy, John— . . 

Commercial st. corner Foster ft., personal injuries, petition 
a 551, c 5"i9 
Kelly, John, et al. — 

Henchman st., sewer, petition a 499 
Kellev, John F.— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Kellev, Maria 0. F.— 

Franklin st., personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120 
Kellev, Patrick- 
Claim for $20 paid under protest a 109, cl20; leave to with- 
draw a 574, c 576 
Kellev, Stephen P.— 

Appointed constable a 481 
Kellcy, Thomas J. — 

Fourth st., injuries to horse, petition a 456, c 460 
Kellv, D.D. et al.— 

Sumner st., Maverick sq., etc., paving, petition a 26 

Liverpool st. , cars, petition a 414 
Kelly, J. II.— 

Post-office sq., hoisting lines, petition a 314 
Kelly, Malachi— 

20 Ward Bt. (ward 23), grade damages, petition a 314, 32i ; 
leave to withdraw 691 
Kemp, James A. — 

Kemp Bt., lighting, petition a 213 
Kemp, Robert — 

North sq., sewer, assessment a 47 
Kendall, Charles c. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Kendall, George F. — 

Lantern in front of Fountain house, petition a 26 ; permit a 64 
Kendall, John Y. — 

Appointed constable a 431 ; displaced 691 
Kendall, Mary A. F.— 

Prebli ng out, $90 damages a 402 

Kendrick street (ward 25) — 

Wooden addition to building, rear Lake St., petition c5S). 

Stable : petition a 586; permit 616 
Kendricken, Paul II., councilman (ward 2") — 
Oaths of office 1 
Elected : mmittee 7 

Director for public institutions (in non-concurrence) a 29, 
44, c 56 67, a 77. c 86, a 159, 175, c 187, 201, 

a 211, 214, c 222, 223, a 2 
Appointed: committee on Last Boston ferries 11; police 11; 

public buildings 11; city charter 49 ; care of hydrants 207 
Remarks : 

Appropriation bill 183 

excavating machine 200, 226 
Rewards for detection and conviction of incendiaries 437 
South-end branch librai • 
Location i No. 12 693 

Kendricken, Paul II. it al. — 

Orchard park, new fence, petition a 209, c 220 ; leave to with- 
draw a 2 
Orchard park, sidewalks, gutters, petition a 209 
Intersection of Dudl nd West Cottage sts., cross- 

k, petition a 480 ; report 500 
Kennard, Charles E. — 

Sunnier st., personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120 
Kennard avenue — 

Sewer : abatements a 212, 335, 547, 558 
Assessments a 335, 547, 508 
Kenney, John — 

Elected weigher and inspector of lighters a 197, c 225 
Kenney, Joseph — 

Death, investigation c 171, a 175, c 1S8, 202, a 211, c 312, a 314 
Kennej , Patrick— 

A, nblic weigher a 213 

Kerrigan, Bernard — 

Personal injuries, petition a 533, c 536 ; referred a 574, c 576 
Keyes, Thomas — 

Reimbursement for building bath-house, petition a 414, c 418 
A st., wooden building, petition c 694, a 7u0 
Keyes street — 

Grading etc. a 43 
Poles : petition a 591 ; permit 631 
Kidder. II. P.— 

Gift of marble group for new Latin school building a 568, c 576, 
.88, c 601 
Kidder, II. 1>. et al.— 

Washington st. (Dorchester), petition against track a 93 
Kidder, II. P. & Co.— 

1 stand-pipe at Milton, petition c 346; report, reference to 
water board c 379, a 383 
Kidney, John A., councilman (ward 6) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Elected : committee on accounts 10; chairman 16 
Appointed : committee on assessors' department 11 
Remarks : 

Assessors' department 58, 67 
Second assistant assessors 154, 207 
Use of council chamber 322 
Decoration day 325 



Resignation 346 
Kiley, M. J. et al.— 

Washington st. (ward 24), petition for leave to erect pole a 514 ; 
permit 521 
Killian, John, et al. — 

Meridian st. (ward 22), lamps, petition a 499 
Killion, John J. — 

Appointed public weigher a 1S9 
Kimball, Moses — • 

1'aik sq., petition that circle be curbed and lamp-post erected 
a 59 
King, E. F. & Co. et al.— 

India st.. paving, petition a 59 
King, Franklin, et al. — 

Ware st. (ward 24) , petition to put in order a 241 
King, Franklin — 

Ware st., edgestones, petition a 297; order passed 317, 516 
King, Franklin — 

Bellevue St., edgestones, petition a 543; order passed 558 
King, George A. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
King, George M. — 

Compensation for loss of horses a 26, c 31 
King street — 

Edgestones, gutters, roadway: from Dorchester av. to Adams 

i passed a 317 
Petition to put in order a 349 

southerly Bide, remonstrance a 480 
Grading : order passed a 516 
Trees : petition a 518, c 523 
Kingsbury. I). P.— 

park, abatement of edgestone assessment, petition ft 
174 ; order passed a 217 
in street — 
is : injury a 93. c 99 
Telegraph poles : a 2C9, 217 
Kittredge, F. W.— 

169 Blue Hill ut., edgestones, petition a 349; order passed 367 
Knapp, Frederic P. — 

Appointed constable a 4S1 
Knapp, Russell K. — 

stable a 481 
Knapp street — 

Sewer : petition a 468 ; order passed 472 
uid, William — 

iiiti d assistant superintendent of Warren bridge a 388 
Kneeland street — 

Running empty ears a 171 

t 189, e 200, a 280, c 283 
Grading: between Albany and South sts., petition a 258; 

Tracks: Lincoln to Washington St., and between Federal and 

Lincoln sts., petition a 629 
To Old Colony i;.K. station, petition a 619 

1 — 
Elected trustee of Mt. Hope cemetery c 222, a 230 
Knight & Mclnti 

n bus and New Seavcr St., sidewalk, petition a 314; 

order passed 3<j7 
Knight, M. (i.— 

sidewalk, petition a 468; order passed 500 
Knowlton. Mrs. M. E. — 

1 Beacon st. stable, petition a 613; permit 649 
Koen, Mill s— 

Appointed supt. north draw Chelsea bridge a 471 
Krogman, Samuel B. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 120, a 124, c 130, a lo9, c 14 ( , 
a 156 

L street (S.B.) — 

l'etitiou for change in deed of land c 120, a 125 ; report and or- 
der a 197, c 200 

Approval of dwelling houses c 307 
Laborers, city— 

Increase in pay c 21, 92, 1C6, a 110, c 398 

Contract system c 40 a 43 

Work for unemployed c 41, a 43 

Order to fix pav a 197, 211, 217, 304, c 307, 348, 365, 408 

Pay of disabled laborers c 312, a 315, c 411, 476, a 480 

Pay of teamsters a 318 

Sheds in Fast Boston a 558 

Pav for thanksgiving c 584, a 586 

Christmas pay c 648, a 649, c 652 

Division of labor, petition a 586 
La (1 range street — 

Lantern : Xo. 42, petition a 518 ; permit a 545 
Lagrange street (VT.R.) — 

From Washington st. to Newton line, grading, gravelling a ^8 
Lallv, Thomas— 

Compensation for loss of child, petition a lo5, c 100; leave to 
withdraw a 264, c 268 
Lamartine street — 

Between Centre and Boylston sts., macadamizing a 59 

From Centre to Boylston St., grading a 59 

Poles : petition a 314 ; permit 389 

Lamps : petition a 13 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXXV 



Stable : permit a 159 
Lamprey, John S. — 

2 AYellington St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 543; order 
passed 558 
Lamps — 

Standing committee a 12 

George H. Allen appointed superintendent a 59 

Annual report of superintendent a 14 

Superintendent authorized to purchase supplies, etc., and em- 
ploy men a 47 

Committee authorized to visit other cities a 47 

Addition to repair shop a 47 

Wages of lamplighters a 115, 211, 500 

Contract for gas a 143 

Gas for Roxbury a 216 

Gas for Charlestown a 246 

Gas for East Boston 545 

Gas for South Boston 545 

Increase of light, in street lamps a 109, 124, 665 

Four-foot burners on street lamps a 59, 155, 665 

Certain streets in East Boston, substitution of gas for oil a 465 

Sundry petitions granted a 665 

Alger st. a 468 

Avon st. (ward 23), a 518 

Blue Hill av. a 13, 365 

Bodwell st. (ward 20) , a 59 

Beach st., U.S. hotel a 258, 281 

Bremen st. a 349 

Brattle st., corner Brattle sq. a 400, 425, 467 

Baker st. (ward 23), a 456 

Blossom st. a 485 

Blue Hill av., junction with Norfolk st. a 499 

Bowdoin sq. (ward 24), a 518 

Bessom court a 613 

Church st. (ward 25), a 327 

Canterbury st., from Walk Hill st. to Blue Hill av. a 349 

Capen st. a 365, 568 

Columbia st. a 365 

Centre st. (ward 23), a 443, 456 

Childs st. a 468 

Colby place (ward 20) . a 480 

Dorchester, increase of light in lamps a 59, 665 

Dale av., Roxbury a 499 

Elm St., Charlestown a 13 

E St., a 13 

East Second st. a 43 

Earl st. a 241 

East Eagle st. a 241 

Evans st. a 365, 568 

F, corner Gold st. a 518 

Gilbert St. (ward 23) , a 13 

Granite av., Dorchester a 456 

Grove st. (ward 23), a 456 

Gold, corner I 1 ' st. a 518 

Gardner st. (ward 23) , a 574 

Harvard av. (ward 25), a 124 

Hotel Brunswick a 468, 483 

Hamlet st. (ward 20), a 543 

Howard av. , between Sargent and Hartford sts. a 551 

Holden court a 586 

Kemp st. a 213 

Lamartine st. (ward 23), a 13 

Lawrence av. (ward 24), a 77 

Mt. Vernon st. (ward 25), a 327 

Mill st. (ward 4), a 442 

Mather st. (ward 24), a 443 

Melville av., Dorchester a 468 

Meridian st. (ward 22), a 499 

Nelson st. a 365, 568 

Oak st., corner May place a 59 

Oakland st., Brighton, petition to light court a 297, 365 

P st. a 43 

Park sq. a 59 

Pope st. a 349 

Perkins St., Charlestown a 465 

Prince st. (ward 23), a 533 

Pevear place (ward 21) , a 586 

Rockwell st. a 425 

Rutherford av., between Nos. 61 and 63 a 456 

South Cedar-street place a 124 

Stauiford st., passage-way rear of Nos. 22-26 a 209 

Summer st., Dorchester a 349 

Summit st. (ward 23), a 499 

Spring lane (ward 23), a 533 

Terrace st., No. 10 a 109, 144 

Tufts st. a 383 

Tremont temple, a 514, 519 

Tremont St., No. 264 a 514 

Tremont place (ward 24) , a 533 

Washington st., between Albano and Beach sts. a 139 

Woodbine St., No. 52 a 139 

Walnut av., near Elmore st. a 327 

Woodman st. a 456 

Washington st., Nos. 736 and 738 a 465, 483 

Wilmont st. a 468 

Ward St., between Parker st. and Bumstead lane a 468 



Wyoming St., Roxbury a 518 
Willow court a 568 
Lamsou, Mary E. — 

57 Hampden St., removal of telegraph post, petition a 629 
Lancaster street — 

Macadamizing, etc. : petition a 327 ; order passed 367 
Lands, public— 

.Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Superintendent nominated a 68 ; ballots a 63, c 87, a 93, c 100, 

a 110, c 122, a 125, c 136, a 139 
Annual report of superintendent a 43; final report a 544 
Church, Suffolk, and Northampton st. districts a 30, c 31 
Lot at junction of Columbus av., Eliot and Pleasant sts. a 85, 

95, c 99 
Lot at corner of Harrison av. and Beach st. a 85,95,c 99, a 414, 

c 418, a 472, c 475 
Discontinuance of department c 137, a 139, c 173, 187, a 189 
Sale of lands and buildings authorized a 143, c 146, 166, a 175 
Lot on West Camden st. a 366, c 370, 398, a 400 
Boston Water 1'ower Co., petition for removal of restrictions, 

etc., on land a 241, c 249 ; leave to withdraw a 499, c 502 ; 

notice of land filled, etc. c 421, a 426, 471, c 475, 490, a 514 
List of land and buildings suitable for sale c 532 a 533, 617 
Orange court, damage to estate a 13, c 16 
Brookline av., confirmatory deed c 18, a 26 
Lamb's map of Boston, first division of lands c 21, a 26, c 40, 

a 43 
Middlesex St., new bond for estate a 59, c 66, a 97 
38 Porter st. and 33 Wheeler St., laud and buildings forfeited 

and bonds cancelled a 97, 98, c 106 
L st. (S.B.), petition for change in deed of land c 120, a 125; 

report and order a 197 
East Newton St., cancelling condition upon lands a 155, c 160, 

a 211 
Tremont st. and Union park, modification of deeds a 155, c 160, 
a 211, e 220 

Modification of conditions of sale a 230 

Declaration respecting deeds a 306 
East Dedtaam St., new bond aud agreement a 155, c 160, a 211 
Third st., approval of houses, petition a 258, 268 
78 Waltham St., release of condition on estate, petition a 314 
Dedham St., modification of deed, petition a 551, c 559; leave to 

withdraw a 614, c 621 
Trustees Massachusetts Homoeopathic hospital, petition for 

land adjoining estate a 586, c 601 
Temporary wooden building on land surrendered to city, peti- 
tion c 636, a 663, c 670, a 676 
Lane, John — 

Warren bridge, personal injuries, petition a 465, c 475 
Lane, John I., councilman (ward 13) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on harbor 11 
Remarks : 

First assistant assessors 121 
Lang & King — 

Longwoodav. rear of, between Nos. 93 and 97, erection of wooden 

building, petition a 109, c 120; permit a 126, c 130 
Lang, Mary — 

Winter st. near Tremont St., personal injuries, petition a 663, 

c670 
Langdon street — 

Sidewalk: No. 12, petition a 124 

Edgestones, sidewalks : Nos. 22 and 24, petition a 124 

No. 26, petition a 130; order passed a 248 
Wooden building : movement from 321 Dudley st., permit a 416 
Langford, George A. — 

Charles st., personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120; leave to 

withdraw a 246, c 249 
Langmaid, Chase — 

Metropolitan av., laying out in 1872, land damages, petition 

a 349 
Laudiu, Mary — 

Bailey st. (ward 24) , stable, petition a 276 ; permit 317 
Laurel street — 

Hitchiug-post : petition a 209 
Laurel street (Roxbury) — 

Sidewalks: No. 9, petition a 456; order passed 467 

No. 7, petition a 456; order passed 467 

No. 13, petition a 480; order passed 500 
Lauten, Albert P., eouucilmau (ward 14) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on printing 11, streets 11, treatment of 

poor 11, paving 11 
Elected : trustee of Mt. Hope cemetery a 44, c 55 
Remarks : 

Street crossings 20 

Contested seat in ward 1G 36 

Contract system 40 

Fire on Federal and Devonshire sts. 40 

Decoration day 55 

Assessors' department 70 

Commonwealth av. 73 

Extension of Broadway 86, 10S, 167, 373, 3S2 

Badges 152 

Appropriation bill 183 

Discontinuance of public laud department 187 



XXXVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Carson's excavating machine 200 

Fourth of July celebration 223 

City forester's greenhouse 232 

Free concerts 234 

Charlestown almshouse 286 

Stony brook 287, 822 

Committee on parka 295 

New court-bouse 310 

South-end branch library 323 

Decoration day 824 

Barrel wagons 337 

New main from Chestnut-hill reservoir 372 

Law department 394 

Pay of laborers 409 

Rewards for detection and couviction of incendiaries 438 
250th anniversary 102, -IT.'), 477 
Repairs on the council chamber 477 
Back-bay improvements 503 
Public parks 625 
Purchase of land on Clay St. 632 
Treasury department 542 
Increase of police force 560 
Inspection of vinegar 578 
Waste of water 603 
Enlargement of City hospital 606 
Death of councilman Perkins 634 
Revised ordinances 055 
Law department — 
City solicitor : 

.lohn P. Mealy nominated and elected a 64, c 87 

Semi-annual report a 366 

Elevated railroads : instructed to appear at hearing a 501 

Ojiin 

On report of names for first assistant assessors, accept- 
ance unnecessary, reconsideration, nugatory e 121 
On election of second assistant assessor for ward 12a 211 
On the Burrill claim a 245 
On payment from incidental fund without reference to 

finance committee a 434 
On taking reservoir lot for court-house a 607 
On distribution of soup for the poor c 621 
On power to locate departments c 674 
On power of city government to locate fire apparatus a 687 
Special counsel c 312, a ol4 

Changes in ordinance a 335, c 337, 3S0, 391, a 400 
City conveyancer a 416, c 419 
Lawler, John — 

Childs St., sewer, abatement a 335 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1 1 al. — 

Walkhill St., petition a 43 
Lawrence, Daniel S. — 

Appointed superintendent Chelsea bridge a 120 
Lawrence, Thomas F. — 

Blue Hill av., crosswalk, petition a 43 
Lawrence avenue (ward 24) — 
Lamps a 77 
Grading a 77 
Leach, Charles II. — 

Mt. Vernon st. (Dorchester), grade damages, petition a 174 
Learnard, Samuel T. — 

Washington St., near Allston st. (ward 25), stable, petition 
a 568 ; report 590 
Leases — 

Portion of wharf corner Albany and Swett sts. a 94, c 99, 106 
Leather — 

Measurers appointed a 109 
Upper leather : measurers appointed a 189, 209 
Leatherbee, John W. — 

S'.'O Albany st., removal of telegraph pole, petition a 568 
Leatherbee, William II. — 

Albany st. (ward 16), stable, petition a 425; permit 440 
Leatherbee, William II. — 

Columbia st., relocation between Washington st. and Blue- hill 
av., 840 damages a 429 
Leatherbee, William U. & Son — 

Dedham St., mollification of deed, petition a 651, c 559; leave to 
withdraw a 614, c 621 
Leavitt, Thomai — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Leckey, John — 

Western av., injury to well, petition a 468 ; leave to withdraw 
500 
Lee, Rev. Charles F. — 

Chaplain at organization of city government 1 
Lee, Charles J. et al. — 

Dudley st., at Howard av., crosswalk, petition a 568 
Lee, Luther M. et al. — 

Adams st. (ward 24), between Field's corner and Bowdoin St., 
sprinkling, petition a 213 
Lee, William H. — 

Nominated and elected clerk of committees a 64, c 87 
Lee street (ward 23) — 

Sewer : petition a 241 ; remonstrance a 258 ; report and order of 
notice 282; hearing 297 ; order passed 317 
Legislative matters — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12; ordinance transferring 



powers to committee on ordinances c 463, a 465, c 548, 561, 

578, a 586, c 605. 6J4, 629 
Old state house c 11, 16, a 26 

Powers of school committee c 5, a 13, c 19, 20, 31, a 43, 44 
Protection of cemeteries c 20, a 2''., c ■>' , a 59 
New court-house — see County of Sul 
City hospital c 41, a 43, c 50." 7 1 , 87, 100, a 110 
Arnold arboretum — see Public parks 
Chelsea bridge— see Bridges 

Prevention of waste of water — see Water 
Pensioning firemen — see Fire department 

gating power to appoint assistant assessors — see Assessors 
New site for public library — see Libraries 
Bridge to Charle.-towu— see Bridges 

Charles-river embankment c 73, a 77, 96, c 99, 106, 326, 329, 464 
City officers opposing legislation c 02, a 93, c 104, 206, a 211, 

464 
Reports of pending petitions, etc. c 92, a 93, c 106, 122, 137, 153, 

188, 228 
Fire marshal — see Fire department 
Hecord of assessments for public improvements c 296, a 297, 

c 312, a :U4, c 319, 363, a 365 
Steam-engines and boilers c 532, a 533 
City seal a 534, c 536 
Telegraph and telephone wires and fixtures c 537, a 543, 555, 

c659 
Annexation of Squantum to Boston a 518, e 
Constitutional ameudmcut abolishing tax qualification of voters 

a 54 I 
Inspection of vinegar, modification of act c 565, 578, 605, a 013 
Qeneral meetings of voters c 565, 576, a 586, ti'.tl 
Proposed abolition of voting precincts — see Elections 
New forr) landing a 580, 5'Jl, o 601 
High-service water Bystem a . 685 

Fraiuiughaui water Supply n 514, c 628, a 629, C 635 

Change in building laws a 665, c 670 
M\ stic pond a 668, c 670 

Expenditures of school committee c 674, a 078, c 004, a 700 
Liabilities of steam and street railroad corporations for con- 
struction of bridges a 691, c 6'J2 
Lehigh street — 

graph poles ! a 584, 535 
lion pipe : petition a 607; permit, 650 
Lennon, Bernard — 

nge court, damage to estate, petition a 13 c 16; leave to 
draw a 97 c 106 
o. — 
290, 292 Washington St., metal furnaces, petition a 174; permit 
a 211 
Lennon, tfllen, it al. — 

Elicit st.. between Swett and Boston sts., sewer, petition a 443 
Lennon, Malachi — 

Blue Hill av., relocation, $70.50 damages a 600 
Leonard, Cora — 

■I st., widening, $800 damages a 620 
Leonard il. of ward 25— 

Western a v., construction, macadamizing, etc., petition c 32 a 43 
Louth, George- 
Culvert place, stable, petition a365; permit, 388; remonstrance, 
414; conditional permit 429 
Lcvcrett street- 
Claims : personal injuries a 189, c 200, a 268, c 263, a 352, c 354, 
I, c 390, a 586, c 601 
walks : petition a 174; report and order a 198 
Lewis, Paulina N. — 

Preble St., Pningout between Dorchester av. and Rogers St., 
damages a 388 

Lewis, Sarah R. — 

Deceased, order to pay salary due a 48, c 49, 71 
Lewis, W. A. el al. — 

, petition to put in order a 155 
Lewis, Woodbury L. — 

iuted fence-viewer a 214, c 222 
Inquiry into acts of, petition a 327 
Lewis Wharf Corporation — 

ge deposits, dredging, petition a 258 
Lewis pars — 

Flagstaff: report a 276, c 283 
Lexington avenue (ward 25) — 

able : near Washington St., petition a 613 ; permit 680 
Petition a 663 
Lexington street — 

Sidewalk : abatement a 109, 145 
Libraries — 

Public Library : 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 13 
Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 
Lamb's map of Boston — see Printing 
Trustees nominated and elected a 29, c 31, 55, a 189, c 201 
South-End branch c 31, a 43, c 239, 250, 272, a 277, c 323, 341, 
a349,c3.J4, a 445, c455.a68T 1 .622, 638, a 649 

New site a 63, c 66, a 276, c 283, a 402, 414, 431, c 436 
Annual report a 427 
Social Law /./bran/ : 

Annual appropriation for 1879, petition a 26 ; orderpassed 
a 47 ; for 1880, petition a 568 ; order passed a 587 



IXDEX TO PKOCEEDLNGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXXYII 



Licenses — 

Standing committee a 12 

Hack aud wagon a 46, 94 

Newsboys a 46, 64, 84, 94, 112, 126, 143, 159, 176, 197, 216, 
246, 282, 299, 315, 352, 367, 387, 466, 471, 484, 500, 515,519, 
534,545,557 

License of Michael Sullivan revoked a 519 

Petroleum — see Petroleum 

Coaches — see Omnibuses, etc. 

Bootblacks a 84, 143, 176, 197, 216, 282, 299, 352, 387, 466, 471, 
484, 500, 515, 545 

Inquirer Publishing Co., permit to hire licensed minors a 176 
Lightbody, Sarah B. — 

Sumner st., personal injuries, petition c 421, a 426 
Lighters — 

Quarterly reports a 28, 210, 401 

Amendment of ordinance — see Sewers, sub-head of Improved 
sewerage 

Weighers and inspectors nominated and elected a 197, c 201, 
225 
Lime — 

Inspector appointed a 214, c 222 
Lime alley- 
Steps : pay for building a 68S 
Lincoln, Frederic W. — 

Appointed commissioner on West Boston and Craigie's bridges 
a 125 

Elected commissioner of Prison-Point'bridge a 127, c 136 
Lincoln, Xoah— 

Appointed public weigher a 514 
Lincoln, William — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay"a 125 
Lincoln street — 

Widening, damages, a 144, 265 

South Boston Railroad Co., transfer of cars from Chauncy St. 
a 159, 179, 198 

Paving, petition a 189 ; order passed 430 

Tunnel : petition a 365 ; permit 389, 416 

Telegraph poles : a 514, 535, 551 
No. 28, removal, petition a i6S 
Near Summer St., order passed a 589 

Curbstones : No. 48, petition a 613 

Tracks : between Kneeland and Beach sts., petition a 629 

Middlesex R.U. Co., additional cars, petition a 649 

Claims : personal injuries, petition a 663, c 670 
Lincoln street (Charlestown) — 

Sidewalks and crosswalk : petition a 209 
Lincoln street (ward 24) — 

Sewer: petitions a 174, 230 ; hearing 276; order passed a 282 

Stable : permit a 446 
Lincoln street (Brighton) — 

Edgestones : petition a 297 
Lindall, Horace — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 209 
Linden street (ward 24) — 

Sewer : petition a 124 ; report and order of notice 144 ; hearing 
155 ; order passed 350 

Macadamizing, etc., petition a 3S3 

Stable : petition a 425 
Linden street (Brighton) — 

Sewer : abatement a 472 
Linscott, John, et al. — 

Currier & Landers, passenger wagon, petition in favor a 400 
Litchfield, Jairus L. — 

Appointed weigher and inspector of bundle hay a 125 
Litchfield's wharf- 
Passenger wagons, etc. — see 0mnibuse3 
Little, C. L.tet al.— 

Summit st. (ward 23), lamps, petition a 499 
Little, Samuel, et al. — 

Warrenst, (Roxbury), between Dudley st. and Grove Hall, 
sprinkling, petition a 209 
Livermore, George B. et al. — 

Winship et. (ward 25) , crosswalks, petition a 59, report 4S3 
Livermore, Samuel B. — 

Appointed inspector and weigher of bundle hay a 125 
Liverpool street — 

Abatement of sidewalk assessment, petition a 26 

Trees : No. 25, petition a 241 , c 249 

Tracks : petitions to require running of cars a 414, 425, 500 

Removals, petition a 456 
Loans — 

$280000 for new main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir— see 
Water 

$320000 for Broadway extension— see Broadway 

S1500000 temporary loau, c 462, a 465, 470, c 475 
Locke, Isaac — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of cellar No. 18, a 447 ; transfer 
of stalls 97 and 99, a 690 
Lockwood Manufacturing Co. — 

73-79 Sumner st. (ward 2), wooden building, petition a 629, 
c 635, 694, a 700 
Loftstrom, Magnus — 

207 Centre st., edgestones, petition a 383 ; order passed 404 
Lombard, Adelia — 

Kennard av., sewer, $4 abatement a 212 



Long, Ellen — 

Dartmouth st., abatemeut of sidewalk assessment, petition 
a 124 ; permit a 145 
Long, William B. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Longley, Henry W. — 

Appointed fire commissioner a 209, c 222 
Longwood avenue — 

Crosswalk : at Bellevue St., petition a 209, report a 217 
Wooden building : between Nos. 93 and 97, erection, petition 

a 109, c 120 ; permit a 126, c 130 
Opposite Worthington st. , enlargement, petition c 475, a 480 ; 

permit c 526, a 533 
Plank walk : southerly side, petition a 545 
Loring, Abraham M. — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Loring, Francis — 

Auburn St., laying out and extension of, $352 damages, order 
to pay a 197 
Loring, Francis, et al. — 

Park st. (ward 24), sewer, petition a 109 
Loring, Horace — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Lothrop, Harriet J. — 

Chandler St., personal injuries, petition a 276, c 2S3 
Loud, J. C. & E. A. et al. — 

Commercial st., sprinkling, petition a 383 
Lovell Brothers — 

New Faneuil Hall market, transfer of cellar No. 5, report in 
favor a 471 
Lovell, Clarence P., councilman (ward 1) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on public institutions 11 ' 

Water 11 
Remarks : 

Salaries of city officers 149 
Gates at the ferries 153 
Appropriation bill 184 
Death of Joseph Kenney 204 
Bridge to Charlestown 205 
Excavating machinery 224 
F'ree concerts 233 
Charlestown almshouse 285 
Use of couucil chamber 322 
Barrel wagons 340, 356. 390 
Fourth of Juh' music 347 
New main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir 372 
Fire alarms 419 

Discharging of vessels in the stream 475 
Salary of superintendent Chelsea bridge 548, 625, 670 
Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 663 
Low, William A. — 

Harvard av. (ward 5) , petition that grade be established a 433 
Lowell street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 327, c 337 
Lowland street — 

Macadamizing, edgestones a 97 
Lucas, Isaac S. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Lucas, James H. et al. — 

121-123 West Sixth st., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 189; 
order passed a 212 
Luther place — 

Estate of Francis Raynes a 28 
Lyman, M. \V. et al. — 

Ninth st., gravelling, etc., petition a 109 
Lynch, Catherine — 

251 Last Eighth St., sidewalks, petition a 425 ; order passed 447 
Lynch, John E. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Lynch, Martin — 

H^de Park av. and Mt. Hope st., plank walk, petition a 43 
Lynch. Nicholas G.— 

Appointed constable a 481 
Lvnch, William, heirs of — 

8 Ward st., $500 damages a 416 
Lynde, Charles, et al. — 

Lincoln st. (Charlestown), sidewalks, crosswalk, petition a 209 
Lynde street (ward 7) — 

Stable : Nos. 20 and 22, petition a 543 ; report 590 
Lyons, Edward II. et al. — 

Perkins st. (ward 23) between Pond av. and Prince St., side- 
walks, petition a 514 



M street — 

Sewers : abatements a 77, 144 

Edgestones, gutters, etc. : between Eighth and Ninth sts., peti- 
tion a 93; order passed 317 
MacdonaKl, Edward A. ct al. — 

Metropolitan av.. gravelling, etc., petition a 43 
Macdonald, Francis X. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Madison square — 

Order to put in condition for accommodation of public referred 
a 211; report a 265, c 268 



XXW1II 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Madison street — 

Petition to put in order a 43 
Magenot, John, ft id. — 

Reading st. (ward 20), petition to put iu order a 448 : leave to 
withdraw 471 
Maguire, Patrick, el al. — 

Use of Faneuil Hall, report in favor a 471 
Maguire, P. James, councilman (ward 19)— 
Oaths of (i Hice 1 
Appointed : committee ou assessors department 11 

Public parks 11 
Remarks : 

ga 20 
m 40 

. nt CS 
New court-house 107 

of city officers 150 
Badges 152 

a 154 

App 

c-ii \ nting machine 200 

l it;. . 232 

Transfe 

Mahan s> \ ■ — 

Moi -oo len building to, petition a i 

Mali , 

Knee juries, petition a lb'.', c 2 

Mah' ' , „ im u „ 

remitted, estate forfeited a 112, 

Main street — 

Tracks : Middli ' ition a 43 

■ in front of Thorndike Hall, petition a 124; per- 
1 14 
Pavii 1 railroad crossing to Cambridge St., order 

, remffval, petition a 643; perm.; 

JIai lames— 

ler, petition, order notice a 649 ; hear- 

Malonev, 1). J.— 

istant superintendent of Mt. Washington av. 

Maloney , Margaret — 

Rutherford av., injuries, petition a 270, c2S3; leave to with- 
dra 
Mah — 

Rutherford av., injuries, petition e 295 
Mann 

, stable, petition a 109 ; permit 
26 Williams St., extension of wooden building, petition 
. c 351 
Man i thy V. — 

Ap] a 450 

Manning ,et al. — 

is and Hampden sts., sprinkln. 

a 241 
Mansfield, James II. — 

Belt ase granted a 049 
Man warring, Timo. W. — 

, iinic kiln, petition a 97 ; permit a 128, 139 
Maple strei 21) — 

permit a 281 
Marbl i H. — 

endent Warren bridge c US, a 150 
■ ne — 
So 
Mai el — 

m a 319; order passed, 36* 

' M. — 
Aj. .era 109 

Mar t — 

building, Boston, Uevcre Beach and Lynn 
R, , c 288, a 243 

. ieave to lay pipes a 241 

enlargement, petition a 319 

Movement from Marginal 1 Junction) to 301 

to 124, petit inn a 466 
. 227 Webster st, petition a 468 
and A. R. Co., petition a 514; permit 574 
Mari. ;ie — 

Auburn si iwalk and sewer at, peti- 

77; 
,\ u i .ii j] i in 

urn st. (ward 8) , abatement of sidc- 
i;iou a 174 
Marion, 0. II. el nl. of ward 25- 
th department litiou c 32, a43 
Marion r II. K. — 

Sparhawk st. (ward 25) stable, petition a 258; permit a 281 
Marl. 

: petition a 124 



Market street (ward 2-">) — 

Stable: petition a 412; permit 446 

Corner Brighton av., petition a 499 ; permit 
Petition a r>4.'3 ". permi 
Wooden buildings : rear near Wiuship St., petition a 465, c 475 ; 
pen 
lioar, near Western :iv., petition a 405, c 475; permit a 471 
Rear VVinship av., petition c 601 
Markets — 

Standing committee a 12 

Faneuil Hall market, supt. appointed a 59; authorized to em- 
ploy deputj a 97 
Transfers of stalls : No. 60 a 128 : N 27 a 416 ; 

No. 24 a 416; Noa. 127-129 a 458 : No. 3 
and (53 a 467 j No. 103 a 558 ; M | Nos. 97-99 a 

Transfers of cellar: No. 4 a 1 So. 8 a 410; No. 18 

a 447 ; No. 22 a 458 ; No. 11'. a 407 ; No. 5 a 471 ; No. 20 

Transfer of stands: No. 6 

Mercantile Market, enclosing sheds, petition a 649, c 652 
Marks, W. I,.— 

Wooden building, rear Cambridge st. a 13, c 10, a 47, c 49 
Marlborough stn 

Macadamizing : petition a 13 

Sidewalks: No. 316, petition a. 230: order passed 248 

St., petition a 480; order passed 500 
No. 180, petition a 607 

Rdgi I ler passed 447 

At 8" : 468 

Ed' Ick sidewalks; corner Hereford St., petition 

i 248 
At 372, petition a 425 ; order passed 447 
Between Hereford st. and West Chester park, order passed 
a 430 
Marsh, Lucius K. <t (d. — 

Huntington av., from Albany bridge to West Chester park, use 
rotting ground, petition a 124 
Maraton, Frank I 

Appointed weigher of coal and measurer of wood and bark a 26 
Marston, Moaes M. — 

Adams st. (ward 21), edgestones, assessment a 666 
Martin, General r. — 

itfa anniversary, chl< , resolution of thanks a 472, 

c 475 
Martin, John 11.— 

Nominated and elected director of public institutions a 159, 175, 

e Is: 

Martin, William D. — 

Massachusetts I lanlc Association— 

■a motor in anniversary pn petition a 443 

ttle'ment of Boston, resolution of thanks 

c 475, a 480 " 
Release of land on Chauncy St. a 050, c 051 
Massachusetts Mi lc Hospital, trustees of— 

Land ad a a 580, c 601 

Massachusetts Humane Society — 

Charles river, iron 1: I ition a 230, c 232 : report a 281 

• husetts Institute for Feeble-Minded Youth — 
Ninth and M sts., sewer, abatement, petition a 77; permit 

a 1 14 

Matchett, W. F. et al — 

Oakland st. (Brighton), petition that court be lighted a 297 
Mather street — 

I, 212 
O; damising from Dorchester av. to Allston St., 

_ 18 
d 447 
No. 5 : a 425 ; o sd 417 

30 ; order i 
: 8 ; order passed 540 
petition a 413 
Maverick Oil Co. — 

Chi E.B.), license to manufacture and store petroleum 

■ ■ — 
Pai 

c 100, a 329, 402, c 405, a 425, c 436, 

a 547, e 
Improvement of enclosure c 138, a 139; report inexpedient 

Wati rtiou," petition a 297, c 307; leave to withdraw 

Claim ial injuries, petition a 443, c 454; leave to with- 

Paving : order passed a 45S 
reet— 
reen New and Meridian sts., request to macadamize c 138 
i 189 ; permit a 212 
Mav, Benjamin — 

" Borrougb • nt a 98 

May, Benjamin, 2d — 

Burroughs st., sewer, abatement a 98 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XXXIX 



May, F. W. G.— 

Dorchester av., widening, order to pay a 197 
May place — 

Corner Oak st., lamp a 59 
Mayer, Anna M. — 

46 Vale st., edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 465 ; order passed 500 
Maynz, Edward, et al. — 

Newbury st. from Exeter to Fairfield sts., edgestones, petition 
a 297 
Mayor — 

Oaths of office 1 
Inaugural address c 12, a 14 

Disposition of topics in address c 12, a 14, c 39, a 44 
Chairman of finance committee c 18 
Chairman of committee on harbor defences a 44 
Chairman of committee on statues of John Winthrop and Sam- 
uel Adams a 15 
Courtesies to distinguished strangers a 15, c 16 
Tote and voice in board of aldermen c G52 
Messages — 

Cheap postage — a 13 

Protection from fire, plan of Edward Atkinson c 122 

Influence of public parks on valuation — see Public parks 

Extension of D st. c 62 

Death of councilman Joseph Healy c 218 

Use of mayor's office offered to board of aldermen and 

accepted a 230 
New site for public library a 276 

250th anniversary of settlement of Boston — see Boston cele- 
brations 
Steam fire-whistle in Brighton a 365 
Compensation of inspector of vinegar a 241 
New Orleans presentation flag a 365, c 370, 410, a 415; 

thanks a 431 
City hospital, non-paying patients a 413 
Drinking fountains c 373, a 413 
Anniversary of formation of State government a 518 
Gift of marble group by H. P. Kidder a 563, c 576 
Neglected children a 586, c 601 
Death of councilman George T. Perkins c 632 
Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. c 667 
For nominations — see office headings 
Maywood street — 

Edgestones, sidewalk a 174 
McAleer, Ellen — 

264 Tremont St., lamp, petition a 514 
McAvoy, Dennis S. etal. — 

C et., between Fourth and Fifth sts., sewer, petition a 425 
McCabe, John J. — 

Appointed superintendent Chelsea bridge a 126 
McCarthy, John — 

P St., personal injuries, petition c 274, a 277; leave to withdraw 
c 410, a 415 
McCarty, John — 

Personal injuries, petition c 475, a 480 
McCarty, Timothy — 

Tremont St., sewer assessment a 98 
Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 139 
1558 Tremont St., edgestones, petition a 499 ; order passed 521 
McChesney, William T. — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
McCleary, S. F.— 

Elected city clerk 4 
McConologue, Daniel, et al. — 

Cooper st. (ward 7), paving, petition a 426 ; order passed 447 
McCormick, Patrick — 

Millett st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 480 ; permit 500 
McCorry, J. Stuart — 

Appointed constable a 456 
McCullough, Elizabeth — 

Court st. , between Bulfinch and Stoddard sts., personal injuries, 
petition a 663, c 670 
McCullough, R.— 

Bainbridge st., near Dale st. (ward 21), stable, petition a 533; 
permit 547 
McDavitt, Elizabeth — 

Commercial St., $25000 land damages a 246 
Atlantic av., land damages, petition a 649 
McDermott, John — 

87 Condor St., stable, petition a 480; leave to withdraw 688 
McDonald, Isaac W. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
McDonald, John — 

Jamaica St., sewer, abatement a 98 
McDonald, Sarah E. — 

Corner Causeway and Leverett sts., personal injuries, petition 
a 383, c 390 
McDonnell, Patrick — 

Union av. (W.R.), land damages, petition a 456 ; leave to with- 
draw 515 
McEntyre, Edward — 

Mt. Vernon st. (ward 24), damages, petition a 189, c 200; re- 
port, referred, a 315, c 319 ; leave to withdraw a 355, c 354 
McFarlaud, Thomas — 

Cabot st., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 425; order passed 
447 



McGinness, Michael — 

Beacham st., near Arlington av., steam engine, petition a 349 ; 
hearing 400 ; permit 402 
McGinnis, Eliza — 

Release granted a 519 
McGuire, Edward — 

Payment of dues authorized a 467, c 475 
McIIugh Terence — 

Wages due to father, petition a 551 
Mcintosh, John S. et al. — 

Lagrange street (W.R.), from Washington street to Newton 
line, grading, gravelling, petition a 26 
Mcintosh, Levina — 

Blue Hill av., land taken, petition a 174; leave to withdraw 
a 197 
Mcintosh, Levina M. — 

West Cottage St., damages, petition for hearing a 230 ; order 
passed a 446 
Mcintosh, William H. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Mcintosh, William H. et al. — 

Deputy collectors, petition for increase of salary a 26 
McKay, D. H.— 

Maywood st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 174; order passed 
a 198 

Dorchester av., stable, petition a 518 ; permit 547 

Dorchester av., opp. Victoria st,, removal of tree, petition 
a 425 

Victoria St., at Dorchester av., crossing, petition a 465 ; report 
471 

Blue Hill av., corner Hayward St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition 
a 518 ; order passed 546 

Blue Hill av., between Quincy st. and Lawrence av., sewer, 
petition a 551 

49-51 Munroe St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 568 
McKay, George E. — 

Appointed superintendent of Faneuil Hall market a 59 
McKay, Martha A.— 

Dorchester av., corner Victoria St., sidewalks, petition a 413; 
order passed 447 
McKelvoy, Robert, et al. — 

Orchard park St., sidewalks, petition a 413 
McKenney, Elizabeth — 

Everett st., abatement of sidewalk assessment, petition a 109; 
permit a 145 
McKillop, Angus, et al. — 

47-49 Everett St., stable, remonstrance a 349 
McLaughlin, Hugh — 

203 Endicott st., projection of step, petition a 213; leave to 
withdraw 534 

Petition that paving of streets be let out by contract a 241 
McLaughlin, Patrick — 

Commercial St., widening, $7500 damages, order to pay a 111 
McLaughlin, Philip J., councilman (ward 6) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on salaries 11, paving 11 

Remarks : 

Salaries of city officers 149 
McLaughlin, William — 

River St., widening, damages, petition a 425; order to pay 587 
McLean, Charles R. el al. — 

Eutaw st., sidewalks, petition a 349; order passed 447 
McMahon, James — 

517 Eighth St., sidewalk, petition a 586 
McMahon, Philip- 
Loss of cow, petition a 551 
McMorrow, John F. — 

Appointed public weigher a 663 
McMurtey, Alexander — 

Sprinkling streets in ward 25, petition a 155 ; permit a 179 
McNamara, .Jeremiah J., councilman (ward 19) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on treatment of poor 11 
McNeeley, Thomas — 

Western av. (Brighton) widening, land damages, petition a 414 
McNeil, John — 

Appointed public weigher a 189 
McNeil, Neil- 
Commercial st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 139 ; permit a 176 
McNerlin, Hugh — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Maiden bridge a 388 
McNiven, Mary Ann — 

190-194 Medford st. (Charlestown) , personal injuries, petition 
c 671, a 676 
McPherson, E. M. et al. — 

Putnam sq., watering, petition a 276 
McSwceuey, Margaret E. — 

78 Baxter st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 480 ; order passed 
500 
Mead, Harrison — 

561 East Fifth St., sidewalk, petition a 258 
Mead, John !•'. — 

Harwich St., between Dartmouth and Yarmouth sts., permit to 
close a 467 
Means, Robert F. — 

Appointed inspector of petroleum and coal oils a 125 



XL 



INDEX TO n:OCEi:i)IXGS OF city council. 



Meaney, Edward F. — 

Warehain and Plympton sts., damages, petition a 189, c 200; 
report referred a 315, c 319 
Mechanic street — 

EdgeRtone, sidewalk a 93 

No. 15, edgestones, sidewalk a 109 
Mechanic stint [Charlestown) — 

Stable: petition a -43 ; permit a Go- 
Mechanics' national bank — 

Dorchester av., removal of telegraph post a 80 
Medford, town of — 

Petition to legislature for regulation of deposits iu Mystic pond 
a 6i 13, C 
Medford street (Charles town) — 

Claims : personal injuries, petition c 071, a 676 

Stable : leave to withdraw Vol 
Meeting-llouse hill — 

Coaches from Neponset av., permit a 17G 

Naming squan n square 

Meigs, .1. V. and J. .1. McDavitt, d al. — 

Charter for elevated railroad, petition a 543, c 548; notice of 
hearing referred a 686; report, city solicitor instructed to 
api" 
Melville avenue- 
Stable: petition a 174; permit a 198 

■ewer: petition a 414; order for hearing 415; hearing 426 ; or- 
der passed 440 

E Igestones ; petition a 425; order passed 447 

Petition a 443; order passed 458 

I, mi in a 4iW 

Mercantile Saving* Institution, receivers — 

Taxes assumed, Seventh st. c 347, a 34y; assessments c 398, 

Mercantile Library Association — see Libraries, South-end branch 
Mercantile street — 

Extension: from Clinton to South Market St., a 40, 94 

Grading and paving extension : petition a 241 
Meridian streel — 

Metropolitan U.K. Co., double track on bridge, petition a 59 ; 

report and order of notice a 447 ; hearing 405 
Grading, gravelling, from Decatur st. to Heath pi., order 

a 281 
Telephone poles : permit a 335 , 

Sidewalk : west Bide, petition a 468; order passed 500 
Meridian i rd 22) — 

Lamps : petition a 499 
Merriam, Benjamin — 

Appointed constable a 45G 
Merrill, Moody — 

Columbia Bt., erection of wooden building, petitiou a 59, c 66; 

permit a 94, c 99, 100 
Self-pro, -see Highland railroad 

Blue Hill av. and Columbia St., lamps, petition a 365 
Merrill, Silas W — 

125, 1'27 and 129 Newbury st., sidewalk, petition a 230 ; order 
passed a 
Merrill, B. 0. * F. II.— 

45-51 Charlestown st., petroleum, etc., license a 335 
Merrimac street — 

Claim.-: personal injuries, near Havmarket sq., petition a2 l J7, 

c 307, a 327, c 337 ; leave to withdraw a 3-58, c 390 
Damages : to wagon, petition a 297, c 307 
Merritt, Charles II. — 

Kennard av., sewer, $4.87 abatement a 212 
Messenger, citj — 

Alvah II. Peters nominated and elected a 64, c 87 
Assist u. ts appointed a 189, c 200 
Methodist ministers — 

Sunday concerts at South Boston and elsewhere, remonstrance 
a 383, c 390 
Metropolitan avenue (ward 23) — 
Gravelling, etc. a 43 

Laj ing out in 1S72, land damages, petition a 349 
Metropolitan Railroad Co. — 

bed 16 
Trs [h Milk, Oliver, Franklin and Broad ets. a 247 

ted a 259 
red a 401, 429 
Track -ant sts. and Savin-hill av. a 404 

71st lot ■ i US, 42'.) 

Trai U Bowdoin st. (Dorchester) a 416 

72' i 429 

Curved track corner Washington and Northampton 8ts. a 616 
West-End line, additional ears a 1S9, 458, 480, 516 
73d 

Double track on Meridian-st. bridge a 621 
74th loca 

lington St. i Don luster), double track, petition a 13; 
;, 213 ; order of notice a 159 ; hearing a 209; 
'247 

ard 24), erection of wooden 
ling, petition a 121, c 13"; permit c 173, a 175 
Washington st., near Norfolk st. (ward 24), stable, petition 

West Chester paik and Beacon st., double track, petition a 124 
ucy St., near Bedford St., deviation of track granted a 115 



Milk, Oliver, Franklin and Broad sts., tracks, petition a 155 ; 

hearing a 213 
Belt lines: petition a 109 ; order of notice 159; bearing 209 ; 

order passed 618 
Camden St., sewer, petition a 213; bearing 276 
Sumner St., track to Maverick sip, petition a 276; order of 

notice 317; bearing 849; ordei passed 389 
Dartmouth st., from '4'remout to Marlborough st., tracks, 

petition a 270 
Huntington av. to West Chester park, tracks, petition a 276 
Lanterns on trees in West Koxburv, petition a 327, c 337 ; 

permit a :;--S. c 390 
Stoughton, Pleasant sts.. Savin hill av. (Dorcb 

order of notice a 317 ; hearing 349 ; permit 404 
Adams st., through Bowdoin st. to Geneva av., extension of 

track, report, order notice a 350 ; healing 400; permit 410 
Liverpool st., petitions to require running of ears a 414, 
Meridian-st. bridge, tracks, petition a 69 ; report, order notice 

a 447 ; heaving 466 ; order passed 521 
Northampton and Washington sts., turnout, order notice 

a 458 ; hearing 480 ; permit 616 
Hancock st. (ward 24), turnout, petition a 518; order notice 

534 ; hearing 508 ; order passed 589 
Dudley st., nearly opposite lirook av., double track, petition 

a 543; report and order notice 558; hearing 613; order 

passed Oil 
Centre and Quincy sts. (ward 24), telephone poles, petition 

a 543; permit 
Dudley st., near lirook pi. iwnd 20), stable, petition a 568; 

repo: 
Park St., near Dorchester av. (ward 24), stable, petitiou a 668; 

report 590 
Allstou st., telephone poles, permit 689 
75th location accepted B 
76th location accepted a 629 
77th location accepted a 649 
Michigan avenue — 

Petition for completion a 314 
Middlesex Railroad Co. — 

Park, Common, Adams sts., tracks, petition a 43; remonstrance 

a 93; order of notice a 198, 230; hearing ■ '241 
Charlestown s.p and junction of Main and Bunker bill sts , 

change of tracks, petition a 43; order notice a 198, 230; 

hearing a 241 
Chelsea st., additional track, order notice a 198, 230 ; hearing 

a 241 
Tracks o st., I'ark/Adauis and Common sts., and City 

sq. a 243, 267 
22d location accepted a 270 
23d location accepted a 433 
Cambridge and Alford sis. (Charlestown), tracks, petition 

a 297; report, order notice 867 ; hearing 400 ; permit 430 
Beacbam st., south of West st., temporary closing, permit 

a 367 
Additional cars to Old Colony and Albany depots, petition a 425 
Havmarket s.p, cross connection, petition a 450 
631 and ti.33 Main st. (Charlestown) , removal of trees, petition 

a 543; permit 
Beach and Kneeland sts. etc., tion B 649 

Additional cars through Washington, Summer, Lincoln, Beach, 

Milk, Congress, State, Devonshire sts., etc., petition a 649 
Middlesex street — 

New bond for estate a 59, c 66, a 97, c 106 

Estate of Patrick Mahony, taxes, forfeiture a 112, c 120, a 159, 

c 160 
sidewalk: corner Bingham St., petition a 241 

Petition a 443; order passed 458 
Midland railroad — 

Notice of hearing from railroad commissioners a 13, 15 
Militia- 
Armories, standing committee a 12 
Battery A, light artillery, fuel 440 

Rapali ing armory a 558 
Company <•, ninth regiment M.V.M., repairing armory a 658 
Institute of Technology, use of drill hall a 605 
Fifth regiment, petition a 189 J §250 for head-quarters 247; 

rent 247 
Company D, tilth regiment in., $b00 for rent, $300 for furnish- 
ing 247 
Milk- 
Topic in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 
Martin (irilrin appointed inspector a 59; annual report a 259, 

I on inspection of milk a 128, c 130 
Milk street— 

Mel '., tracks a 155, 213, 247 

--ing: froi Kllby sts , petition a 2'J7 

Middlesex R.R. lonal cars, petition a 649 

Mill street (ward 4) — 

Street la' on a 442 

Mill street ( Wanl 24)— 
Watering : petition t 

le : near Ashland St. petition a 514 ; permit 519 
Miller, A. H.— 

14SU Tremont st., steam engine and boiler, petition and order 
of notice a 77 : hearing a 110 ; permit a 127 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XLI 



Millett street (ward 24) — 

Stable : petition a 480 ; permit 600 
Millis, Lansing — 

Anawan av., edgestones, petition a 400 ; order passed 416 
Milton, William H. — 

2356-2362 Washington St. (Roxbury), edgestones, sidewalks, 
report and order a 179 
Milton avenue - 

Grading, gravelling: from Norfolk to Fuller St., order passed 
a 403 
Minden street — 

Laying out : damages a 94 
Miner, A. A. — 

Water in streets and squares for drinking purposes, petition 
c 373, a 383 
Minors — 

Board of aldermen authorized to make rules or grant licenses 
a 15, c 16 ; rules adopted a 28 
Minot, William, and William Minot, jr., trustees — 

Essex St., widening, $9955 damages a 265 
Minot, William, trustee, et al. — 

Holbrook st., sewer, petition a 499 
Minot street (ward 8) — 

Petition that name be not changed c 694, a 700 
Minton, Peter J. and Bernard — 

Adams St., relocation, $34.16 damages a 97 
Minton, Thomas — 

Child st. (ward 23), stable, petition a 413 ; permit 458 
Mitchell, Catherine — 

Minden St., laying out, $1500 damages a 94 
Mitchell, Henry A. — 

Walton st. (ward 22), stable, petition a 109 ; permit a 128 
Mitchell, Luke — 

Geneva av., extension from Columbia st. to Warren st. via 
Marston av., $600 damages a 366 
Mitchell, Thomas D. — 

Basto place, near Salem St. (ward 23), stable, petition a 414; 
permit 429 
Mitchell, W. F. et al.— 

Court leading from Oakland st. (Brighton), lamps, petition 
a 365 
Mitchell, W. S.— 

Beach st. near Centre st. (ward 23), stable, petition a 349; 
permit 367 
Monahan, James — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Broadway bridge a 388 
Monahan, Patrick — 

Commercial St., widening, $7000 damages a 111 
Monroe & Arnold — 

45 Everett st. (ward 2), wooden buildiDg, petition c 346 
Montgomery street — 

Vacant lot corner Tremont st., fence c 172, a 174; order 
referred c 256, a 258 
Monument square — 

Hitching-post : petition a 209 
Monument square (ward 23) — 

Passenger wagons: through Centre st. to Allandale springs, 
petition a 327; permit 352 
Moore, Charles H. — 

Nos. 736 and 738 Washington St., lamp and post, petition a 465; 
report 483 
Moore, John F. et al. — 

Brighton av., Malvern and Garden sts., park and playground, 
petition c 322 
Moran, John B. — 

Terrace St., crosswalks, petition a 109; permit a 127 
Morehead, J. C. et al. — 

Removal of track of South Boston railroad to centre of Fourth 
st. from K to L St., petition a 241 
Moreland street (ward 21) — 
Stable : petition a 213 
Edgestones, sidewalks : order passed a 300 
Morgan, Henry — 

Telephone poles near Morgan chapel, remonstrance a 400; 
removal, petition 414; leave to withdraw 447 
Morgan, Hugh, el al. — 

Canterbury st. from Walk Hill st. to Blue Hill av., lamps, 
petition a 349 
Morris, John — 

Appointed undertaker a 543 
Morris, T. B. — 

Rutherford av. near Lincoln St., stable, petition a 586; permit 
616 
Morrison, George — 

Elected superintendent Meridian-st. bridge c 149, a 156, c 160 
• Morrison, James — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Meridian st. bridge a 388 
Morrison, John W., councilman (ward 17)— 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on fire department 11 ; public instruction 

11, excused c 12 ; funeral of councilman Perkins 634 
Remarks : 

Payment of amount retained on contract 99 
Proposal of John Reardon 99 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 373, 408 
Fire alarm 419 



Public parks 508, 540 
Death of councilman Perkins 633 
Location of steam fire engine No. 12 692 
Morrison, Nahum M. et al. — 

Gardner st. (ward 23), petition to put in order a 533, 574 
Morrison, William H. — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Federal-st. bridge a 388 
Morse, A. B. and H. B. Taylor— 

12 to 28 Pearl pi., edgestones, petition a 258 
Morse, Albert, et al. — 

Petition to allow coasting a 13 
Morse, Edwin T.— 

No. 95 Chelsea st. (Charlestown), druggist's mortar, petition 
a 124 ; permit a 144 
Morse, Henry — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Morse, Leopold — 

South St., $25800 damages a 300 

Essex St., $2150 damages a 300 

South st., basement of store, petition a 499; permit 515 
Morse, L. Foster — 

Harrison av. from Warren to Eustis st., sprinkling, petition 
a 213 
Morse, Randall G. — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Morse, Sidney B., estate of — 

Stearns' wharf, Albany St., erection of wooden building, 
petition a 93, c 99; permit a 126, c 130 
Morton, Josephus, et al. — 

Bowdoin av. and Eldon st., petition to put in order a 59; order 
passed 467 
Moseley, Charles H. — 

Appointed weigher of coal a 59 
Moseley, Edward A. — 

Howland St., edgestones, sidewalk, $43.36 abatement a 546 
Moseley, L. E. and A. J. Tuttle, executors — 

Sprinkling city streets, petition a 174 
Motte street — 

Paving : petition a 365 
Moulton street — 

Crosswalk to Bunker Hill St., petition a 124, c 130 
Mt. Bellevue— 

Improvement of summit c 32, a 43 
Mt. Hope street — 

Grading, etc. a 26 

Plank walk a 43 
Mt. Hope cemetery — see Cemeteries 

Annual report a 329 
Mt. Pleasant avenue — 

Trees : removals, a 29, 209, 265 

Edgestones and sidewalks, corner Fairland St., petition a 241 

Wooden building : at No. 11, petition a 327, c 337 ; permit a 350, 
e354 
Mt. Pleasant place (ward 20) — 

Stable: No. 5, petition a 365 ; leave to withdraw 467 
Mt. Vernon street (ward 23) — 

Edgestones, a 189, 212 
Mt. Vernon street (ward 25) — 

Lamps : petition a 327 
Mt. Vernon street (ward 15) — 

Stable : near Dorchester st., petition a 568 ; report 590 
Mt. Vernon street (Dorchester) — 

Grade damages, petition a 174 

Claims : Edward Mclntyre, sewer damages, petition a 189, 
c 200; report referred a 315; leave to withdraw a 353, 
c351 

Petition to put in order a 456 ; from Dorchester av. to Boston 
st., grading, macadamizing, edgestoues, gutters, order 
passed 500 
Mulchinock, Michael — 

Extension of Essex St., $2350 damages a 317 
Mulcarron, Patrick — 

Deceased, order to pay sum due c 455, a 457 
Muldoon, Miles — 

15 Brighton st. (Charlestown), sidewalk, petition a 443 ; order 
passed 458 
Mullen, Hannah — 

Lexington av. near Washington st. (ward 25), stable, petition 
a 613; permit 630 
Mullen, Leonorah — 

Lexington av., stable, petition a 663 
Mullen, Thomas — 

Washington St., relocation at Brighton ; $96 damages a 84 
Muheady, Christopher— 

i'erryboat Lincoln, damages, petition a 209, c 220 
Munroe, Abel B. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Munroe, Jotham E. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Munroe & Arnold — 

47 Everett st. (ward 2), stable, petition a 349; remonstrance 
349; permit 415 
Munroe street — 

Edgestones, sidewalks : No. 49-51, petition a 56S 
Murphy, Ann — 

120 Dove St., abatement of sidewalk assessment, petition a 213 



XLII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Murphy, Catherine — 

North Bennet st., son killed, petition a"485; leave to withdraw 
a 515, c 623 ; petition for hearing a 633, c 536 ; report a 629, 
c635 
Murphy, C. B. et al. — 

Cabot st. near Linden park, sprinkling, petition .1 258 
Murphy, John, et al. — 

Seventh st., macadamizing, petition a 43 
Murphy, Julia — 

Personal injuries, petition a 43, c 49 
Murphy, Mary — 

97 West Fifth st., grade damages, petition a 543 
Murphy, Timothy A., councilman (ward 20) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on public institutions 11 
Murray, Catherine — 

Personal injuries, petition c 32, a 43 
Murray, Elizabeth — 

201 Havre st., sidewalk, petition a 518 ; order passed 574 
Murray, J. S. — 

Dorchester av. near Victoria st., removal of tree, petition a 651 ; 
report 587 
Murray, P. — 

Second and K sts., stable, petition a 514 ; permit 534 
Murray, Patrick — 

Western av. near Walnut st., Brighton, telephone pole, petition 
a 230 ; leave to withdraw 691 
Murray. Patrick K. — 

Coaches from Neponset av. to Meeting-IIouse hill, permit a 176 ; 
transfer to Win. F. Abbott 519 
Mylod & Richardson, et al. — 

From Alexander av. to Taylor av., crosswalk, petition a 189 ; 
order passed a 248 
Myrtle street (Dorchester) 

Alleged trespass by agents of citv, petition a 124 
Myrtle street ( ward 23)— 

Sewer: petition a 124; report and order of notice a 144; hear- 
ing a 155; order to construct a 212 



N street — 

.Near Ninth st., wooden building moved to a 59, 85 
Narragansett street — 

Petition to put in order a 443 
Nason, Hiram I., councilman (ward 3) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on City hospital c 11; overseers of the 
poor 11 
Nathan, F'anny — 

Ward st., sewer assessment a 47 
National Lancers — 

Faneuil Hall, use of, petition a 297 ; permit 336 
Natural History Society — 

Newbury st., sidewalk, petition a 349 ; order passed 430 

Review of procession, damages to grounds, petition a 499, c 502 
Nawn, Owen, et al. — 

Lamartine st., grading, petition a 59 
Nazro, George R. el al. — 

Grampian way (ward 24), plank walk, petition a 676 
Neal, James, et al. — 

Tenean st., Neponset, plank walk, petition a 607 
Nelson, Angus — 

Elected supt. Dover-st. bridge c 148, a 15 
Nelson, David C. — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Dover-st. bridge a 388 
Nelson, William — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Dover-st. bridge a 388 
Nelson street — 

Lamps : petition a 365, 568 
Neponset avenue — 

At Pope's hill, petition a 43 

Petition to put in order a 43 

From Mill st. to bridge, petition to put in order a 59 

Coaches to Meeting-House hill, permit a 176 ; transfer 619 

Near Chickatawbut St., edgestones, report and order a 179 

F'ront of Dyer estate, permit to occupy sidewalk a 198 

Sewers: between Walnut and Taylor sts., petition a 276 ; order 
of notice 317 ; hearing 327 

Telegraph poles : petition a 383 

Between Adams st. and Neponset bridge, permit a 689 
Nettleton, Aaron F. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Nevins, John .1. — 

407 East Third St., personal injuries, petition c 694, a 700 
New Knglaud Manufacturers' and Mechanics' Institute — 

Extension of Huntington av., petition to street commissioners 
referred a 444, c 455 
New England Mutual Life Insurance Co. et al. — 

Avery st., paving, petition a 59; order passed 404 

Post office equate, statue of Leif Ericsson, permit a 179 
New Lamartine street — 

Sewer : petition a 568 ; order notice 617 ; hearing 629 
New Seaver street — 

Edgestones : petition a 109 

Sidewalks : petitions a 276, 314 ; order passed 317, 367 

Grading, edgestones, macadamizing, order passed a 281 



Grading, edgestones, gutters, macadamizing, from Columbia st. 

to Erie av., order passed a 281 
Claims : personal injuries, leave to withdraw a 500, c 602 
New Williams street — 

Grading, petition a 43 
New York & New England. Railroad Co.— 

Washington st., Mount Bowdoin, temporary closing of bridge a 

471 
Commonwealth flats, Fort Point channel (wird 13), wooden 

building, petition c 475, a 480; permit c 526, a 633 
Northern av. bridge, construction, petition a 499, c 602 
Federal st., lamp-posts, petition a 686; order passed 618 
Federal St., telegraph pole, removal, petition a 607; order passed: 
618 
Newbury street — 

From Dartmouth to Hereford sts., macadamizing, edgestones, 

etc., petition a 59 ; order passed 416 
Extension : from Hereford st. to West Chester park a 111, c 120, 

139, a 243, 265, 281 
Vacant land, sale authorized a 143 
Stable : petition a 213 

Sidewalks : Nos. 125, 127, 129, petition a 230 ; order passed a 248 
Natural History Society and Institute of Technology, peti- 
tion a 346 ; order passed 430 
Trinity Church, petition a 456 ; order passed 467 
Petitiou a 499 
Kdgestones: from Exeter to Fairfield st. , petition a 297; order 

passed 500 
Stable: petition a 327 ; permit 350 
Telephone poles : remonstrances, hearing postponed a 400, 426, 

leave to withdraw 457 
Grading: petitions a 468, 480 

Between Hereford st. and West Chester Park, order passed 
a 500 
Plank walk : near 168, petition a 514 

Edgestones, sidewalks: corner Gloucester St., petition a 633 
order passed 558 
Newell, John — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Newell, Lucius, et al.— 

Hudson st., crosswalk, petition a 43 ; permit a 65 
Newell, R. W. Hal.— 

Passagc-wav rear of 22-26 Staniford st., petition that it be 
lighted' a 209 
Newhall, George A. — 

Appointed: measurer of wood and bark a 125; superintendent 
of West Roxbury scales a 189 
Newman, Andrew W. — 

Appointed superintendent of Roxbury scales a 189 
Newman street — 

Edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 365; order passed 404 
Newton, W. \\ .— 

655 Washington st., lanterns, petition a 425 ; report 472 
Nichols, Arthur II. ft al. — 

1 to 25 Blue Hill av., sidewalks, petition a 668 
Nichols, A. II. — 

167 West Ninth St., edgestones, petition a 568 
Nichols, Benjamin R., heirs of — 

South St., widening, $24600 damages a 352 
Essex St., extension from South to Federal sts., $2327 damages 
a 353 
Nichols, Mary M., executrix — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer stall 87 a 630 
Nicholson, Emily E. — 

F St., personal injuries, petition a 663, c 670 
Nickerson, J. S. et al. 

South Boston, increase of light, petition a 109 ; report 665 
Nicols, Mrs. Percy P. — 

Stable, petition a 26; permit a 48 
Niles, Eugene M. — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall 27, a 416 
Niles, George E. trustee — 

Pay for loss and rent for property taken for court-house, petition 
a 93 
Niles, Mary II. — 

Green st. (Charlestown), personal injuries, petition a 209, c 220; 
leave to withdraw a 352, c 354 
Ninth street — 

Sewers : abatements a 77, 144 
Macadamizing, edgestones a 97 
Gravelling, etc., between M and Ksts.a 109 
Sidewalks : corner II st., order passed a 458 
Nixon, Mary, tt al. — 

Boston street, petition a 43 
Noble, William, et al. — 

Commonwealth av., between Chester park and Hereford st.,. 
plank walk, petition a 618 ; order passed 574 
Nolan, William — 

Appointed superintendent Westem-av. bridge to Cambridge,. 
Cambridge-st. bridge and North Harvard-st. bridge a 126 
Nolen, Mary E. — 

Dorchester av., widening, $270 damages a 197 
Nolen, S. — 

41 Upton st., removal of tree, petition a 327 
Noonan, Daniel — 

Appointed constable a 97, 456 ; bond approved a 111 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



NLIII 



Noonan, John F. — 

Broadway extension, $2500 damages a 446 
Noonan, Mary — 

Portland St., personal injuries, petition a 174, c 181; leave to 
withdraw a 280, c 283 
Nopper, F. X. et al. — 

Shawmut av., front German Catholic church, crossing, report 
a 521 
Norfolk avenue— 

Watering, " portion " a 276 
Norfolk street — 

Grading, etc. a 26 

Widening, damages a 144, 587 

Edgestones, petition a 468; order passed 500 

Lamp : corner Blue Hill av., petition a 499 
Norris, Jacob — 

Elected superintendent Federal-st. bridge c 148, a 156 
North avenue — 

Grading : petition a 209 

Edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, from Dudley st. to Brook av., 
order passed a 281 

Sidewalk : remonstrance, leave to withdraw a 521 
North street — 

Claims : personal injuries c 73, a 77 

Paving: from Fleet to Clark St., petition a 314 ; order passed 
367 
North Beacon street- 
Temporary bridge to ice-house a 127 

Wooden building: opposite Lyman av., petition a 465, c475; 
permit c 526, a 533 

Steam-engine: Commercial Manufacturing Company, petition 
a 480 ; permit 534 

Stable: petition a 499 ; permit 515 

Wooden addition to building near Cambridge St., petition c 601 
North Iiennet street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 93, c 99 
North Harvard street (ward 25) — 

Crossing : petition a 59 ; report 483 

Wooden building : movement from Western av., permit a 416 
North Margin street — 

Edgestones : near Lafayette av., petitions a 327, 514 
North Mead street (ward 4) — 

Stable : at 22, petition a 297 
North square — 

Sewer : abatement a 47 ; assessment a 47 
Northampton street — 

Stable : No 82, petition a 276; permit 317 

No. 79, petition a 480; permit 500; cellar, petition 514; 
permit 519 

Turnout: Metropolitan Railroad Co., report and order of notice 
a 458; hearing 480; permit 516 

Nuisance : abatement, petition a 383, c 390; report a 547, c 548 

Wooden building: movement to 728 Albany St., petition a 686; 
permit 650 
Northampton-street district — see Lands 
Northampton-street district — 

Sale of all land and buildings authorized a 143, c 166, a 175 
Norton, Hugh — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Cambridge-st., North 
Harvard, and Western-av. bridges a 388 
Norton, M. H. et al.— 

Petition for sidewalks, etc. a 13 
Norton, Martin — 

Stable: petition a 514; permit 519 
Norton, Michael — 

Late treasurer of Brighton, accounts and bill for services a 124, 
c 130, a 402, c 405, a 416, c 419 
Norton, Patrick — 

Recommended for superintendent of common and public 
grounds a 64, 94; ballots a 94, c 100, a 110 
Nuremberg, Pauline — 

Personal injuries c 57, a 59 
Nute, Orasmua — 

East Dedham St., new bond and agreement for land, petition 
a 155, c 160 ; report and order passed a 211, c 220 

Sprinkling city streets, petition a 174 

O'Brien, Ann — 

Shawmut av., personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120; leave to 
withdraw a 246, c 249 
O'Brien, Frederic C — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
O'Brien, Hugh, alderman — 

Oaths of office 1 

Elected: Chairman of board of aldermen 1; manager Old 
South Association c 18, a 29; trustee public library a 29, 
c 31, 55 

Appointed: committee on armories 12; bridges 12; lamps 12; 
sewers 12; common 12; legislative matters 12; printing 12; 
public buildings 12 ; public institutions 12 ; public lands 
12; public park3 13; Stony brook 13; Faneuil Uall and 
county buildings 30; harbor defences 44; 250th anniver- 
sary 243 

Remarks : address 1 

Public instruction 44 
Waste of water 60, 77 



Legislative matters 93 

Sherwin school-house 141 

Appropriation bill 190 

Vandalism on public garden 259 

New court-house 262, 298, 588, 591, 607 

West Roxbury and South Boston parks 267 

Centre-street sewer 333 

250th anniversary 434, 445 

Constitutional amendment abolishing tax qualification of 

voters 544, 551 
Stony-brook laborers 546 
Defalcation in treasurer's department 614 
Limiting expenditures of school committee 678 
Limitation of municipal expenditures 680 
The final proceedings 702 
O'Brien, John B.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
O'Brien, Michael — 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Broadway bridge a 388 
O'Brien, Patrick— 

227 Cabot St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 400 ; order passed 
416 
O'Brien, William J. et al. — 

Medicine and medical advice for poor, petition a 465, c 475 
O'Brien, William P.— 

139 West Sixth st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 413 ; order 
passed 447 
O'Callaghan, D. et al. — 

F street between Seventh and Eighth sts., petition to put in 

order a 413 
Dorchester st., church St. Augustine, clock, order passed a 557, 
c559 
O'Connor, John T.— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
O'Connor, Patrick — 

Tremont st. near Phillips st., sewer, petition a 327 ; order of 
notice 402; hearing 414; order passed 415 
O'Donnell, Hugh— 

Chauncy st., personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120 ; leave to 
withdraw a 335 
O'Donnell, T.— 

Appointed assistant superintendent of Mt. Washington-av. 
bridge a 388 
O'Dowd, Andrew A., councilman (ward 6) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on public library 11 ; streets 11 ; pay of 

laborers 22 
Remarks : — 

Street and health departments 16 
Old State-house 17 
Pay of laborers 21, 106, 364, 408 
Rules of common council 25 
Assessors' department 69 
Member of board of health 135 
Improved sewerage 146 
Superintendents of bridges 148 
Salaries of city officers 149 
Second assistant assessors 153, 154 
Extension of Broadway, 168 
Appropriation bill 182 
City forester's greenhouse 233 
South-end branch library 253 
Stony brook 288 
Barrel wagons 338, 356, 390 
Obstructions in Commercial street 462 
Pay of laborers for thanksgiving 585 
Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 669 
O'Keefe, James .1. — 

Medford st. (ward 3) , stable, leave to withdraw a 701 
O'Keefe, John D.— 

Corner Fifth and P sts., lantern, petition a 414 ; permit 429 
O'Keefe, Maggie- 
Beach St., personal injuries, petition a 629, c 635 
O'Leary, Thomas — 

Passenger wagon to Mt. Hope and Calvary cemeteries, petition 
a 109 
O'Neil, Joseph D.— 

East Broadway, errors corrected in conveyance of land a 618, 
c62l 
O'Neil, Patrick— 

139 C St., edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 365 ; order passed 404 
O'Neil, Timothy — 

Deceased, pay of sum due for service as police officer, c 461, 
a 465 
O'Reilly, D., jr.— 

321 West Third st., edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 456; order 
passed 467 
O street — 

Edgestones, sidewalks : between Fourth st. and Broadway, peti- 
tion a 543 
Primary school site : purchase, order passed a 555, c 559, 576 
Oak square (Brighton) — ■ 

Watering-trough a 258, c 268, a 366, c 370 

Edgestones and gutters around school-house, order passed a 300 
Oak street — 

Corner May pi., lamp a 59 



XLIV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Oakland garden — 

PasseDger wagons etc. — see Omnibuses 
Oakland street (ward 24) — 

Stable : petition a 59 ; permit a 84 
Oakland street (Brighton) — 

Petition that court be lighted a 297, 365 
Oakland street (ward 21) — 

Sidewalks: petition a 349; order passed 521 
Ohio street — 

Paving a 213 
Oils — see Petroleum 
Old Colony Railroad Co. — 

West Fourth st. (ward 13), wooden building, petition a 327, 

c 337 ; permit a 350, c 354 
Assessment of damages to the estate of Jeremiah Carew a 244, 

297 
Assessment of damages on petition of Otis Drury a 425, 456 
Old South Association — 

Managers nominated and elected c 18, a 29 
Old State-house — see Legislative matters 
Oliver street — 

\ uant land, sale authorized a 143 
Steam-engine, corner Atlantic av. a 143, 189 
Metropolitan B. Co., tracks a 155,213,247 
Olney street — 

Sidewalks, etc. : petitions a 13, 124 

Plank walk : from Geneva av. to Bowdoin St., petition a 425 
Omnibuses, etc. — 

Court and Howard sts., John C. Stiles, petition a 59; leave to 

withdraw a 94 
Mt. Hope and Calvary cemeteries, Thomas O'Leary, petition 

a 109; permit a 176 
Fitchburg station to Litchfield's and Battery wharves, William 

Fletcher, petition a 139; report a 176 
Bowdoin sq. to Litchfield's wharf, George A. Coleman, petition 

a 139 ; permit a 176 
Bowdoin sq. to Litchfield's wharf, etc., George W. Calef, peti- 
tion a 139 ; permit a 176 
Haymarket sq. to Litchfield's wharf, etc., Robinson & Emerton, 

petition a 139 ; permit a 176 
Neponsetav. to Meeting-house Hill a 176, 519 
Change of route, John C. Stiles, petition a 213 
Park sq. to excursion boats, Edward J. Fleming, petition a 230; 

permit 299 
Forest Hills station (W.R.) and Mt. Hope cemetery, Grove Hall 
and Mt. Hope cemetery, Highland Street Railway Co., peti- 
tion a 276 ; permit 299 
Corner Broadway and Dorchester st. to Oakland gardens, Charles 

R. Smith, petition a 314; permit 352 
Monument sq. (ward 23) to AUandale Springs, George B. Guild 

& Co., petition a 327 ; permit 302 
Sullivan sq. to Litchfield's wharf, Currier & Sanders, petition 

a 365 ; leave to withdraw 387 
Hancock sq. (Charlestown) to harbor boats, petition in favor 

of Currier & Sanders a 400 ; permit 415 
Somerville line to Eliot St., leave to withdraw a 429 
Salem st. to Sullivan sq., extension of route, petitions a 456; 
referred to next board of aldermen 700 
Orange court — 

Damage to estate a 13, c 16, a 97, c 106 
Orchard park — 

Guards for trees a 189, c 200 

Sidewalks and gutters : petition a 209 

Watering: petition a 241 

Crosswalks : petition a 241 

New fence: petition a 209, c 220; leave to withdraw a 265, 

.• 268 
Opening from Adams St., petition a 77, c 86 ; report referred 
a 212, c 220 
Orchard street (W.R.)— 

Sewer: petition a 456; remonstrance 465; order notice 467; 
hearing 468 
Orchard-park street — 

Edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, order passed a 248 
Sidewalks : petition a 413 
Ordinances — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Ordinance to amend ordinance in relation to finance referred 

a 663, c 670 
Codification of the ordinances c 154, a 156, c 361, 379, 397, 

a 400, c 604, 626, 638, 649, 653, a 663 
A'acancies in the board of aldermen a 404, c 405, a 630 
Ordinance concerning the joint standing committee on ordi- 
nances c 463, a 465, c 548, 661, 578, a 686, c 605, 624, a 629 
Oriole street — 

Stable a 26, 48 
Osborn, William T.— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Osborne, Daniel — 

Washington St., relocation at Brighton, $664.25 damages a 28 
Otis, R. M. et al.— 

Corner Washington and Poplar sts. (ward 23) , crosswalk, petition 
a 543 
Ottawa street — 

Stable at 13 : petition a 414 ; permit 483 
Overseers of poor — see Poor 



P street — 

Lamps : petition a 43 

Stables : petition a 124 ; permit a 159 

Near Second St., petition a 414; permit 429 

South Boston Railroad Co., tracks, petition a 124; report and 

order of notice 145; hearing 189 
Wooden building : erection a 124, c 130, 173, a 175 
Movement from No. 14 to No. 61 a 209, 217 
Movement from near East Second st. to 582 East Third st. 
a 209, 217 
Claims : personal injuries, petition c 274, a 277 ; leave to with- 
draw c 410, a 415 
Sidewalk : from First to Second St., petition a 400; order passed 

416 
Trees : removal, between First and Second sts., petition a 465; 

report 534 
Edgestones, sidewalk : corner First St., petition a 499; order 
passed 521 
Page, Joseph E. — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Paget, Julia — 

Boats on public-garden pond, petition a 93, c 99 
Paige, B. L. et a I.— 

Centre st. (Jamaica Plain), crosswalk at Burroughs St., petition 
a 241 
Paine & Canterbury — see Pierce & Canterbury 
Paine, Barzillas — 

Adams St., relocation, $38.88 damages a 97; petition a 124; 
leave to withdraw a 197 
Paine, Benjamin F. — 

Appointed superintendent of Brighton scales a 189 
Paine, Henry W. — 

Assignee of Charles Burrill — see Claims 
Paine, Henry W. et al. — 

New conrt-house, petition a 15 
Paine, Isaiah, jr.— 

Appointed constable a 481 
Paine, R. T.— 

Riverside st. (ward 19), stables, petition a 443 ; permit 458 
Paine, R.T.jr.— 

Buckingham st. , stable, petition a 465 

20-22 Riverside st. (ward 19), wooden addition to building, pe*i 

tion a 691, c 601 
12-20 Carey St., sidewalks, petition a 613 
Palmer, Benjamin F. — 

Nominated assessor, c 92 ; elected a 93, c 99 
Palmer, Mary E. — 

Bellevue st., tree, removal, petition a 499 ; leave to withdraw658 
Palmer street — 

Paving: petition a 97 ; from Albany st. to Harrison av., order 

passed a 248 
Sewer : petition a 258; report and order of notice, 282 ; hearing 

297 ; order passed 300 
Sidewalk : No. 23, petition a 586 
Papineau, Alfred — 

Green st. (J. P.), crosswalk at Union av., petition a 213 ; ordei 
passed a 248 
Paris street — 

Vacant land, nuisance c 123, a 125, c 188, a 189 
Park avenue — 

Sprinkling, petition a 189 
Park square — 

Petition that circle be curbed and lamp erected a 59 
Passenger wagon to excursion boats a 230, 299 
Tracks : Metropolitan R. Co., permit a 618 
Park street (Charlestown) — 

Middlesex R. Co., tracks a 43, 93, 198 
Park street (ward 23)— 

Wooden building: near Pelton St., petition a 465, c 475; 
permit c 526, a 533 
Park street (ward 10) — 

Claims: personal injuries, petition a 586, c 601 
Park street (ward 24] — 

Sprinkling : petition a 209 

Sewer: between Adams st. and Dorchester av.. petition a 109; 
report and order notice a 144 ; hearing a 165 ; order to con- 
struct a 212 
Stable : near Dorchester av., petition a 568 ; report 590 
Parker, Augustus, et al. — 

Blue Hill av., petition that part of it be put in condition for 

travel a 13 
Wayne St., petition for grading a 13 

Blue Hill av., between Warren and Columbia sts., edgestones, 
petition that order be rescinded a 297 
Parker, Cornelia V. et al. — 

375-377 Washington St., sewer assessment, petition a 124 
Parker, E. Francis, et al. — 

Washington St., macadamizing, petition a 77 
Parker, George W. — 

l'ynchon st., stable, petition a 568 
Parker, II. D.— 

Hill allowed a 691 
Parker. James H. — 

New Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall 3 a 458 
Parker, J. L. et al. — 

Rockwell St., lamps, petition a 425 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XLV 



Parker, J. Lowell, et al. — 

Rockwell st. (ward 24), sidewalks, grading, etc., petition a 425 
Parker, Nancy G. and Mary F. Wales- 
Washington st. (ward 24), edgestones, remonstrance a 241 
Parker, Sarah- 
Blue Hill av., edgestones, abatement a 618 
Parker street (Charlestown) — 

Sewer: petition a 297; order of notice 317; remonstrance 327 ; 
hearing 327 ; order passed 415 

Petition a 456 
Parker street — 

Crosswalks a 26, 47 

Opposite Longwood av., projection of platform upon sidewalk 

a 59, 85 
Sprinkling : from Tremont to Ward st., a 276 
Poles : petition a 314 ; permit 389 
Petition to put in order and change name a 349 
Stony-brook sewer : exchange of land a 365, c 370, a 417, c 419, 

a 449, c 454, a 484, c 487 
Edgestones, sidewalk : petition a 480 ; order passed 558 
Edgestones : No. 661-663, petition a 568 
Sidewalks : petition a 613 
Parker Hill avenue — 

Grading, gravelling, gutters, order passed a 403 
Parkman, Henry, councilman (ward 9) — 
Oaths of office 2 
Appointed : committee on common 11 ; public parks 11 ; city 

charter 49 
Elected : director of East Boston ferries c 274, a 276 
Remarks : 

School expenditures 5 

Amendment* to rules of common council 12 

Licensing of minors 16 

Contract system 40 

New court-house 42, C21 

Harbor defences 52 

Public-garden pond 57 

Washington's birthday 57 

Extension of Broadway 86, 167 

City officers opposing legislation 92 

Pay of laborers 106 

Salaries of city officers 149 

Bridge to Charlestown 181 

Appropriation bill 183 

Second assistant assessors 207 

Death of councilman Joseph Healy 219 

City forester's greenhouse 222, 232 

Public parks 228, 497, 511 

250th anniversary of settlement 238, 478 

Removing fences enclosing public grounds 268 

Evasion of taxes 268 

Stony brook 272, 313, 320 

South-end branch library 341 

Fourth of July 355 

Codification of ordinances 380, 627, 641 , 655 

Law department 392 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 407 

Reducing motions to writing 411 

Rewards for conviction ami detection of incendiaries 437 

Back-bay improvements 502 

Committee on legislative matters 549 

Inspection of vinegar 578 

Abolition of voting precincts 581 

Extension of Highland park 601 

Horse railroads and public parks 602 

Enlargement of City hospital 605 

Removal of house offal from East Boston 695 
Parkman, William — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Parkman street (ward 24) — 

Movement of wooden building from Washington st. a 124, 159 
Parks, public — 

Joint special committee c 4, 11, a 13 

Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 

Annual report of park commissioners c 56 

Arnold arboretum c 38, a 43, c 237, a 243, c 524, a 534, c 536 

West Roxbury a 47, 59, 158, c 160, 227, 234, a 244, 267, c 272, 

460, 491, 504, 523, 538, 670, a 676 
South Boston a 47, 60, c 66, a 127, 139, 158, c 160, 227, 234, a 

244, 267, c 272, 460, 491 , 504. 524, 527, a 533, c 538, 542, 543, 

a 631, 691, c 692 
Charles-river embankment — see Legislative matters. 
Beacon entrance to Back Bay park a 144, c 146, 166, 382, a 383, 

449, c 454, a 515, c 523 
Influence of public parks on valuation a 157, c 160 
Assessments erroneously made c 228, a 243 
West Wood Island park c 188, a 189, c 238, a 244 
Owners of West Roxbury park c 239, 255, 308 
Stony brook a 246, c 249, 272, a 276, c 286, 313, 319, a 484, c 487, 

504 
Naming Back-Bay park a 299, 335, 425, c 436 
Tax upon street railways c 312, a 314, c 602, a 613. c 635, a 649 
Drainage of Back Bay a 365, c 370, a 417, c 419, a 449, c 454 
Statistical information on Back-liay improvements requested of 

auditor of accounts a 500 c 502; referred to next city gov- 
ernment c 675, a 676 



Charles II. Dalton appointed commissioner c 322, a 329 

Real estate available for park loan, order of inquiry c 550, a 554; 

report c 602, a 613 
Highland park — see Common, etc. 
Betterments on State lands c 635, a 649 
Petitions against public parks c 636, a 649 
Petitions in favor of immediate action c 637, 648 
Compilation of papers, reports, and arguments relating to 
public parks, a 216, 243; city document 125 presented a 700 
Parnell street — 

Laying out : damages a 466 
Parson street (Brighton) — 

Trees : petition to remove a 155 ; permit a 175 
Partridge, S. E.— 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Passenger wagons — see Omnibuses, etc. 
Patterson , David — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Paul, Joseph F. — 

Bay-State wharf, 334-374 Albany St., wooden building, petition 
a 468, c 475; permit c 526, a 533 
Paul street — 

Building: temporary closing a 213, 217, 516 
Sidewalks : petition a 213 

petition a 456 ; order passed 467 
Paving — see Streets. 
Payson, John B. — 

Payson av. (ward 24), stable, petition a 155 
Payson, John F. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 131 
Payson avenue (ward 24) — 

Stable : petition a 155 
Peabody, Lucia M. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Peacock, Freeman — 

Cambridge st. (ward 4), edgestone, $8.97 abatement a 198 
Pearce, Deborah B. — 

Vernon St., personal injuries, leave to withdraw c 57, a 59 
Pearce, John, et al. — 

Washington St. between Forest Hills and South St., widening, 
macadamizing, petition a 241 
Pearl place— 

Edgestones : Nos. 12 to 28, petition a 258 
Pearl street — 

Telephone poles : petition a 456 
Pearl street (Dorchester) — 

Sewer: petition a 533; order notice 534; healing 543; order 
passed 547 
Pearsall, Harriet A. — 

9 Laurel st. (Roxbury), sidewalk, petition a 456; order passed 
467 
Peck & Hall, et al.— 

Lancaster St., macadamizing, etc., petition a 327 ; order passed 
367 
Peirce, Lydia Y. — 

7 Laurel st. (Roxbury), sidewalk, petition a 456 
Peirce, Samuel B. — 

Glendale st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 442 ; permit 446 
Pember, Stephen — 

South st., personal injuries a 499, c 502 
Pembroke street — 

Sewers : between Tremont st. and Columbus sq., petition a 349, 
c354 
From Warren av. to No. 95, order of notice a 402 ; hearing 
414 ; order passed 415 
Pendergast, Alice — 

125 West Sixth st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 258; report 
and order a 281 
Pendergast, George S. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
People's Ice Co. — 

Cary st. opposite Riverside st. (ward 19), wooden building, peti- 
tion a 209, c 220; permit c 238, a 243 
Percy, Lizzie Ann — 

Anawan av., laying out, $735.67 damages a 28 
Perham, Charles S. — 

Election of superintendent of public lands c 87, a 93, c lOO, 

a 110, c 122, a 125, c 136, a 139 
Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Perham, C. S. et al. — 

Temple St. (W.R.), grading, gravelling, petition a 43 
Perkins, E. A. — 

Neponset av., from Walnut and Taylor sts., sewer, petition 
a 276; order of notice 317 
Perkins, George T., councilman (ward 17) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on City hospital 11 ; claims 11 
Remarks : 

City hospital 50, 87, 104, 273, 583, 584 

Decoration day 55, 296, 325 

Decoration of army and navy monument 91 

Badges 152 

Intramural interments 154 

Public parks 237, 508, 540 

South-end branch library 252, 273, 323 

New court-house 310 



XLVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Fire alarms 419 

Ambulance for East Boston 604 
Decease : resolve and orders passed 632 
Perkins street (Charlestown) — 

Lamps: petition a 465 
Perkins street (ward 28) — 

Sidewalks: between Pond av. and Prince street, petition a 514 
Perrin street (ward 21) — 

Tree : No. 34, petition a 230; order passed a 280 
Edgestones, gutters : order passed a 300 
Sidewalks : No. 34, petition a 468; order passed 500 
No. 30, petition a 468 ; order passed 500 
Perry, J. Frank- 
Adams St., corner Ashmontst. (ward 24), stable, petition a 365 ; 
permit 388 
Peters, Alvah II. — 

Nominated and elected city messenger a 64, c 87 
Appointed eonstable a 456 
Peters, Francis A. — 

Forest Hills st., sewer, petition a 174; hearing 276; order 
passed 335 
Peters, F. A. et al. — 

Iio\ Is ton st. (ward 23), petition a 43 
Peters, William — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Petersiiea, ( 'arlyle — 

279, 281 Columbus av., stepping-stone and hitching-post, peti- 
tion a 4J0 
Petroleum, etc. — 

Chelsea st. (K.B.), Maverick Oil Co. licensed a 64, 158 

Inspectors appointed a 125 

2 Ccutral wharf, license a 197 

Second st. between I) and K sts., license a 197 

33 India st., license a 1SJ7 

45-51 Charlestown st., license a 335 

Pettigrew, R. A. and L. F. Abbott— 

Faneuil Ball market, transfer of stall No. 58 a 128 

Pettiugill, Converse M. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 

Pettingill.O. B.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 

Pevear, Charles B. et al. — 

Pevear pi. (ward 21), lamps, petition a 586 

Pevear place (ward 21) — 
Lamps : petition a 

Phelps, Edward A. — 

Passenger wagon from Somerville line to Eliot St., leave to 
withdraw a 429 

Phillips street — 

Sewer : abatement and assessment a 98 

Pickell, John E — 

Appointed supt. Essex-st. bridge a 126 

Pickering, Henry, trustee, et al. — 

Woodman St., lamps, petition a 456 

Pickering, Leonard— 

47 Everett st. (ward 2), extension of wooden building, petition 
a 276, c 283; report, no action necessary a 350, c 354 

Pickering, M. 1'. et al. — 

Hast Canton st., between Harrison av. and Albany St., side- 
walks, petition a 465 

Pierce & Canterbury- 
Chelsea St., near Centre st. (ward 1), wooden building, petition 
a 349, c 354 ; permit c 379, a 383 

Pierce, E. P.— 

Dorchester av. near Greenwich St. (ward 24), stable, petition 
a 365; permit 415 

Pierce, Henry- 
Elected first assistaut assessor c 121, a 124 

Pierce, Henry — 

Richmond st. (ward 24), edgestones, remonstrance a 109 

Pierce, John- 
Elected first assistant assessor c 121 a 124 

Pierce, John 11. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 

Pierce, Lydla Y.— 

7 Laurel St., sidewalk, order passed a 46i 

Pierce, Samuel B.— 

Columbia st., edgestones, petition a 349; order passed 367 
Glendale St., grade damages, order passed a 430 
Ware st., edgestones, petition a 499 ; order passed 516 

Pierce, Samuel B. et al. — 

Greenwich place (ward 24), sewer, petition a 258; order of 
notice 282 ; hearing 297 ; order passed 317 

Pillsbury, Joseph— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Pilsbury, Samuel- 
Common, injuries to wife, petition a 109, c 120; leave to with- 
draw a 204, c 268 
Piukham, Frederick S. — 

Appointed undertaker a 533 
Pleasant street — 

Land : junction of Eliot st. and Columbus av., sale authorized 

a 85, c 99 
Bill-boards : a 43 ; c 49, 57, a 59, 85, c 86 

Pleasant street (ward 24)— 

Sewer : petition a 241 ; hearing 276 ; order passed a 282 



Edgestones, gutters, macadamizing: petition a 241 

Sprinkling: petition a 209 

" Portion," older passed a 248 

Tracks: order of notice a 317; hearing 349; permit 404 

Macadamizing : petition a 40J 

Stable : petition a 468; permit 483 
petition a 533 ; permit 547 

Grade: from Cottage and Pond to Stoughton St., order passed 
a 521 

Sidewalk : petition a 518 
Plimpton, Charles H., councilman (ward 21) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on elections 4; Mt. Hope and Cedar 
Grove cemeteries 11 

Remarks : 

Fire in Federal and Devonshire sts. 31 
Contested seat, ward 16, 33 
Public library 66 
Charlestown almshouse 285 
Increase of police force 560 
Plimpton, Charles H. — 

Highland st., corner Fort av., tree, removal, petition a 480; 
report 558 
Plimpton, Charles II. et al. — 

Washington st. (ward 21), between Dudley and Bartlett sts., 
paving, petition a 241 
Plimpton, II. R.— 

Correction in conveyances, petition a 305, c 370 ; leave to with- 
draw c 460 
Plumer, Joseph A. — 

312 Bast Eighth st., abatement of edgestoue assessment, peti- 
tion B 
Plumer, Joseph A. and Thomas II. et al. — 

Knapp st., sewer, petition a 468 ; order passed 472 
Plummer, George H. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Plympton street (ward 17) — 

Stable : petition a 189 ; permit a 212 

Wooden building : movement to street near Harrison av., peti- 
tion a 209 ; permit a 248 

Claims: Edward F. Mcancy, improved sewerage damages, peti- 
tion a 189, c 200 ; report referred a 315 
Police— 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Extra night force 8 IS, C 16, a 112, c 120 
Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 

Police stations, furniture, repairs, etc., authorized a 30, c 31, 
54 

Commissioners nominated a 125, 155 ; confirmed a 155, c 161 

Mouthly reports of commissioners, Dec. c 5; Jan. 73; Feb. 126; 
March 189; April a 214; May c 346; June, July, and Aug. 
c 460 ; Oct. c 581 

Police charitable fund a 15, c 16, 40, a 43. 244 

Proposed police station on Back Bay a 126, c 130, 461, a 465 

Placing sales in buildings a 159 

Property clerk and police steamboat hands a 199, c 200, a 264, 
872 

Organization of board of police commissioners a 259 

Annual report a 330 

Ladders on Ma-wall on Charles river a 281, 366, c 370, 390 

Bunker Hill monument grounds a 388, c 390 

Addition to police force c 424, a 420, c 401, a 465, c 536, a 543, 
556, c 560, 582. 025, a 629, c 01K, a 651. c 652, a 603 

Pay of deceased policemen a 420, c 461, a 465, 467, c 475 

Lighting hack lanterns a 457, 468 

Obstructions in Commercial st. c 402, a 465 

Studio building, banner sign a 209 

Warren av. i Charlestown), telegraph poles, petition a 349; 

permit 307 

Shawmut av., telegraph poles, petition a 349 

250th anniversary, resolution of thanks c 475, a 480 

Sale of Impure prints, request of school committee referred 

c 565, a 568 
Management of police department, order for hearingindefinitely 
; poned c 500; reconsideration moved, motion decided 
out of order c 576 
Free soup c 686, a 5S6, c 602, a 613, c 621, a 665, c 670 
Pollard, Warren A. — 

Release n fused a 416 
Pomerov, Caroline A. L. — 

South st., $6400 damages a 300 
Pond, E. G.— 

F St., erection of woodeu buildiug, petition a 69, c 66 ; permit 

a 126, c 13J 
K and Dove sts., stable, petition a 383 ; permit 534 
Pond, James T.— 

Appointed public weigher a 213 
Pond street — 

Macadamizing, etc. : from May St. to Brookline line, petition 

a 109 ; order passed 403 
gewet : appeal from assessment a 124 
Abatement anil assessment a 144 
Abatement a 174, 574 
l'etition, request for special committee, leave to withdraw 

a 333, 47.J 
Sidewalks : order passed a 248 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XLVII 



Poole, John C. — 

Elected superintendent Broadway bridge c 148, a 156 
Poor — 

Overseers of Poor — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 
Quarterly reports a 77, 259, 427, 554 
Vacancy a 15, c 16 

Shoes for poor school-children c 41, a 43 
Annual report c 344 

Overseers nominated and elected a 144, 147, o 172, a 175, 
cl82 
Treatment of Poor — 

Joint special committee c 4, 11, a 13 

Reprint of report on treatment of poor a 47, c 49 

Medical attendance for poor, petitions a 456, c 460, a 465, 

c 475; report, leave to withdraw c 694, a 700 
Petition of Lawrence D. Welby a 575; indefinitely post- 
poned c 576 
Free soup c 585, a 586, c 602, a 613, c 621, a 665, c 670 
Report and order to petition for transfer of powers from 
directors of public institutions to overseers of poor 
c 671, a 676; indefinitely postponed a 701 
Poor, George H., trustee — 

Blue Hill av., relocation, damages a 500 
Pope, George W. — 

Appointed trustee of City hospital a 213, c 222 
Pope, Mary A. — 

Wordsworth st. (ward 1), stable, petition a 443; permit 458 
Pope, William, et al. — 

Park, Beach, Mill and Commercial sts. (ward 24), sprinkling, 
petition a 209 
Pope street — 

Lamps : petition a 349 

Wooden buildings : near Moore St., erection, petition a 518 
Nearly opposite Chaucer St., erection, petition c 536, a 543 
Poplar street (ward 23) — 
Gravelling, etc. a 59 

Stable: corner Albion St., petition a 383; permit 415 
Crosswalk: corner Washington St., petition a 543 
Poplar street — 

Paving : between Spring and Charles sts., order passed a 447 
Porter, John W. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Porter street (ward 1) — 

Wooden building : movement from 90 Putnam st., petition a 
591 ; permit 650 
Porter street — 

No. 38, land and buildings forfeited and bond cancelled a 97, 

98, c 106, a 127, c 130 ; sale authorized a 143 
Sprinkling : " portion " order passed a 248 
Sewer : relaying, petition a 297 
Porter street (W.R.)— 

Grading, gravelling, edgestones, gutters, order passed a 430 
Portland street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 174, cl81, a 280, c 283 
Portunato, Catherine- 
OS George st., edgestones, petition a 230 ; order passed a 248 
Post, William S.— 

Appointed constable a 456 
Postage, cheap — 

International memorial, special committee a 13, c 16 
Post Office square — 

New England Life Insurance Co., statue of Leif Ericsson, 

permit a 179 
Hoisting lines : petition a 314 
Potter & Watson- 
Rear 112 Beach St., steam engine, petition and order of notice 
a 426 
Potter, Asa P.— 

Newbury st., extension, $9036 damages a 281 
Potter, J. E — 

Pope st., near Moore st. (ward 1), wooden buildings, petition 
a 518 
Potter, J. P. etal.— 

River St., plank walk, petition a 613 
Potter, Silas — 

Alaska St., erection of bank wall, petition to occupy sidewalk 

a 209, permit a 217, 248 
27 and 29 Alaska St., sidewalks, petition a 276: order passed 
317 
Powell, Michael — 

Claim for injury to horse, Cambridge, corner Joy st., petition 
c322 
Powers, Charles E. et al. — 

Charter for elevated railroad company, petition a 533, c 536 ; 
notice of hearing referred a 586 ; report, city solicitor in- 
structed to appear a 591 
Powers, Melvin & Co. — 

Cambridge st., opposite Brighton st. (ward 4), wooden build- 
ing, petition a 365, c 370 ; permit a 402, c 405 
Powers, William- 
Appointed measurer of upper leather a 189 
Prang, Louis, et al. — 

Centre st. (Roxbury), sprinkling, petition a 213 
Pratt, Charles E., councilman (ward 21) — 
Oaths of office 1 



Appointed : committee on public instruction 11 ; public parks 

11 ; city charter 49 ; care of hydrants 207 
Elected : trustee of public library a 29, c 31, 55 
Remarks : 

Rules and orders of common council 7 

Old State-house 18 

Arnold arboretum 39 

Commonwealth avenue 73 

Thirteenth joint rule 74 

New water-main from Chestnut-hill reservoir 86. 

Extension of Broadway 86, 108, 122, 168, 373 

Decoration of army and navy monument 91 

City hospital 104 

New court-house 108, 310 

First assistant assessors 121 

Member of board of health 131 

Salaries of city officers 150 

Badges 152 

Appropriation bill 185 

Second assistant assessors 204, 207 

Bridge to Charlestown 205 

Fourth of July celebration 223 

Excavating machinery 225 

Public parks 228, 234J 461, 491, 508, 523, 531, 538, 670) 

Erroneous park assessments 229 

Owners of West Roxbury park 238 

South-end branch library 255, 623 

Evasion of taxes 271 

Stony brook 272, 275, 386, 313, 319 

Use of council chamber 322 

Fourth of July 324 

Decoration day 325 

Barrel wagons 360 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 399* 

Flagstaff on Lewis park 421 

250th anniversary 436, 452, 478 

Repairs on the council chamber 476 

Back-Bay improvements 502 

Telegraph and telephone wires 537 

Committee on legislative matters 561, 579 

Management of police department 567 

Visitors to City hospital on Sundays 584 

Revision of the ordinances 627, 646, 654 

Death of councilman Perkins 634 

Additional water-basin 646 

Care of hydrants 648, 652 

Expenditures of school committee 674 
Pratt, Isaac, Jr. — 

Cambridge st., rear, opposite Beacon park (ward 26), stable 

petition a 676 
Pratt, J. E.— 

Personal injuries : petition c 346 ; leave to withdraw a 600, c 502; 
Pratt, John C. et al. — 

Pond and Centre sts., sewer assessments, petition a 124 
Pratt, John L. B. et al.— 

Near Oak sq., watering-trough, petition a 258, c 208; report,, 

reference to water board a 366, c 370 
Pratt, Laban — 

Walnut St., sidewalk, petition a 230 ; order passed a 248 
Pray, Francis W., councilman (ward 5) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Elected : finance committee 7 

Appointed : committee on health 11 ; public lands 11) 
Remarks : 

Trustees of City hospital 274 

Charlestown almshouse 286 

Salary of Chelsea-bridge superintendents 523: 

Union in Maverick sq. 548 

Salary, superintendent north draw Chelsea bridge 548i, 
625 
Pray, John H., Sons & Co. — 

Steam engine, 558 Washington st., petition and order of notice- 

a 143, hearing a 189 ; permit a 211 
Pray, Lewis G. — 

Mt. Pleasant av., removal of trees, petition a 209, c 220; per- 
mit a 265 
Preble street — 

Stable : petition a 93 ; permit a 112 

Grading: from Dorchester av. to Rogers st., edgestones, gutters,. 

macadamizing, order passed a 386 
Laying out from Dorchester av. to Rogers st., damages a. 352" 

388, 402 
Grade damages : petition a 456 
Prentiss, Henry — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Prescott, Edwin R. — 

Washington St., personal injuries, petition a 613, c 621 
Prescott, Mary — 

553 East fifth St., sidewalk, petition a 456; order passed 467' 
Prescott, Otis E. — 

llowland st., edgestoues, sidewalk, $57.22; assessment a 546- 
Prescott, W. L. & C. J. el al.— 

Motte St., paving, petition a 365 
Prescott, William A. — 

Commercial St., widening, and Globe alley, $2670 damages 

a 415 



XLV1II 



INDEX TO PKOCEKDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Prescott square — 

Petition that it be laid out as a public park a 241, c 249 ; report 
a 265, c 268 
Frescott street — 

Crosswalk : petition a 124 
Prcsinger, E. — 

170 Cabot st. (ward 19), stable, petition a 124 
Price, Elizabeth A., administratrix — 

High St. (Charlestown) , sewer, petition a 586 ; order notice 617 ; 
hearing 629 
Priest, J. Edward — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Prince, Frederick 0. [see also Mayor]— 

Inaugurated mayor 1 
Prince street — 

Claim : personal injuries a 139, c 146, a 352, c 354 
Prince street (ward 23) — 
Lamps : petition a 533 
Princeton street — 

Land damages, petition c 120, a 125 ; leave to withdraw c 505. 

a 568 
Movement of wooden building from , a 155, 179 
Printing— . 

Pocket edition of rules, etc., of city government c 4 

Joint standing eommittee <■ 11, a 12 

Annual reports authorized in print a 15, c 16 

Municipal register o 4, a 13 

Mayor's inaugural addrcsu c 12, a 14 

Annual report of superintendent c 71 

Lamb'.; map of Boston, c 21, a 26, c 40, a 43 

$350 additional for city document No. 119, a 30, c 31 

Index to 12 volumes of proceedings of city council c 41, 55, a 59 

Report ou treatment of poor a 47, c 49 

Elevated railroad, evidence and arguments c 186, 201, a 211 

Papers, discussion and arguments on the park question a 210, 

243 
Four volumes of ancient records — see Record commissioners 
Suffolk Deeds, first volume— see County of Suffolk 
Argument of J. L. Stackpole on school expenditures— sec 

Schools 
Registration laws c 274, a 277, c 626, a 533 
Official report of proceedings of city council c 295, 307, a 315 
Codification of the ordinances— sec Ordinances 
List of special statutes c 462, a 465 

Memorial volume of 25' Ith anniversary — see Boston celebrations 
Index of proceedings of city council of 1880 c 504, a 514 
Appropriation : $1500 transfer to record commissioners c 250, 

a 258 ; $2500 transfer to printing a 514 
Reprinting and stereotyping reports of record commissioners 

referred c 628, a 62 J 
Statistics from U.S. census referred a 604, c 670 
Binding documents and reports of proceedings c 695, a 700 
Prior, Parron II. — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stalls 127-129, cellar 22, and 
stand 6 a 458 
Prior, William, jr. — 

Faneuil Hail market, transfer of stalls 127-129, cellar 22, and 
stand 6 a 458 
Proby, .lames — 

Phillips st., sewer, abatement a 98 
Proctor, (ieorge B. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Proctor, John — 

Bolton St., grade damages, petition a 551 
Province street — 

Grading, paving : petition a 443 
Provisions— 

Win. F. Brooks appointed inspector at large a 9d 
Public Baths— sec Bathing. 
Public buildings— see Buildings. 
Public institution?— sec Institutions 
Public instruction — see Schools. 
Public lands— see Lands. 
Public library — see Libraries. 
Public parks— see Parks. 
Puffer, A. D.— 

Projection of bridge across way, leave to withdraw a 11 J 
Pulsifer, EL M., & Co. et al.— 

Williams court, paving, petition a 43; order passed 574 
Purcell, Michael— 

Chelsea st. (Charlestown), personal injuries, petition a 4A>, 
c 436; leave to withdraw a 546, c 548 
Putnam, A. W. et al. — 

Sumner st., from railroad to Cottage St., macadamizing, petition 
a 365 
Putnam, John P. et al.— 

Commonwealth av., telephone poles, remonstrance a 400 
Putnam, J. P. and Lyman Mason, trustees- 
Land for primary school-house, order passed c 272 
Putnam, L. B. et <//.— 

Eagle st., from Putnam to Prescott St., grading, gravelling, 
petition a 241 
Putnam square- 
Watering : " portion " a 276 
Putnam street — 

Sidewalks rabatementa 109, 145; petitiona327; order passed 36/ 



Wooden building: movement to 103 Porter at., petition a 591 ; 
permit 650 
Pynchon street (ward 21) — 
Stables: petitions a 213, 568 

Grading and paving, between Tremont and Heath sts., also 
edgestones and sidewalks a 217 

Q street — 

Grade : between East Fifth and East Sixth sts., petition a 514 
Quigley, William II.— 

Sprinkling streets in Charlestown. petition a 189 
Quincy, Thomas D. et al. — 

Olney street and Geneva av., sidewalks, etc., petitiou a 124 
Quincy street (Itoxbury) — 

Edgestones : abatement, petition a 124; order passed a 179 
Quincy street (ward 24) — 

Poles : petition a 543 ; permit 589 
Quinn, Hugh — 

Tremont st., sewer assessment a 98 
Quinn, John — 

Personal injuries, petition a 400, c 405 ; leave to withdraw a 515, 
c 523 
Quinn, Michael — 

Interment of body in St. Joseph's Cemetery, petition a 77; leave 
to withdraw a 198 
Quirin & Co. — 

Lougwood av., opposite Worthington st. (ward 22), wooden 
building, petition c 475, a 480; permit c 526, a 633 
Quirk, Dennis G. — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Quirk, John — 

Movement of wooden buildings : from 87 and 89 Hampshire St. 
to Mahan av. (ward 19), petition a 258 
From 208 Centre st. to near Highlar.d st. (ward 21), petition 
a 568 ; permit 589 

Railroad commissioners — 

Midland Kailroad Associates, notice of hearing on petition of 
a 13 
Raleigh, Edward — 

Tremont row, damages, petition c]20, a 125 
Ramsell, Edwin F. — 

West Eighth st., injury to horse, petition a 568, c 576 
Rand, Caleb, et al. — 

Increase of light in street lamps, report a 665 
Rand, W. S. H al.— 

Gloucester st., grading, etc., petition a 465 ; order passed 558 
Randall, Benjamin — 

Chelsea st., near Glendon St., wooden building, petition a 643, 
c548 
Randall, Sahna — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Itandall street (Northampton-st. district) — 

Grading a 216, c 220 
Rankin, S. S.— 

20 Eliot st., lantern, petition a 561 
Ratigan, Ellen — 

106 George St., edgestones, petition a 349 ; order passed 367 
Ray, George P. — 

Appointed measurer of grain a 125 
Uayncs, Francis — 

Luther place, city solicitor authorized to receive release of 
estate a 28 
Raynolds, Edward — 

Blue Hill av. (ward 21), stable, petition a 241 ; permit a 281 
Reading street — 

Petition to put in order a 443 ; leave to withdraw 471 
Sewer : between Maiden lane and Swett St., petition a 443 
Reardou, John — 

Proposal to do all work, furnish all supplies for common, etc. 
a 96, 04, c 07, a 84, 93, c 99, 171, a 174 
Reardon, J. T. — 

Everett st. (ward 25) , bitching-post, petition a 533 
Record commissioners — 
Appointed a 125, c 131 
Annual report c 170 
Printing tour volumes of ancient records c 226, a 244, c 200, 

•<,c 274, a 276 
Dorchester record* a 244, c 250, a 258, c 274, a 276, c 487 
Appropriation, $1500 transfer c 250, a 258 
Reprinting and stereotyping reports referred c 628, a 629 
Fifth report presented c 694 
Records, public — see County of Suffolk 
Heed, David K.— 

16 and IS Vale st., edgestones, petition a 465 ; order passed 500 
Reed, Edgar L.— 

Appointed public weigher a 209 
Reed, Franklin o. it al.— 

Mill st. (ward 4) , petition for street lamp a 442 
Reed, George M. et al. — 

Adams st., corner Park St., crosswalk, petition a 533; report 
674 
Reed, William, et al.— 

Vacant lot junction of Tremont and Montgomery sts., fence, 
petition c 172, a 174 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XLIX 



Heed's court (Roxbury) — 

Sewer : order passed a 300 
Reeve, William It. — 

Linden st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 425; permit 446 
Reeves, William R. — 

Appointed public weigher a 13, 125 
Regan, John B. — 

Cancellation of bonds for estates a 98 

Estates forfeited, taxes remitted a 127, o 130, a 159, c 160 
Registrar, city — see Births, marriages and deaths 
Registrars of voters — see Elections 
Reilly, Edward P.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Remmer, Bernard — 

123 West Sixth St., edgestones, sidewalk, order passed a 212 
Renfrew street — 

Sidewalk : No. 37 a 189, 212 

Edgestones : petition a 349 ; order passed 367 
Restieaux, Thomas, et al. — 

Sumner St. (Dorchester), lamps, petition a 349 

Sumner St., at Stoughton St., crossing, petition a 518 ; report 534 
Revere, Henry, etal. — 

Thornton St., petition to allow coasting a 649 
Revere street (ward 23) — 

Sewer : petition a 109 

Report and order of notice a 144 

Hearing a 155 

Order to construct a 212 

Edgestones, grading, etc., petition a 258 ; remonstrance 514 
Rewards — 

Incendiaries c 436, a 442, 516 
Reynolds, Edward — 

Blue Hill av., corner Mt. Seaver av., sidewalk, petition a 456; 
order passed 467 
Reynolds, Frank W. (warden St. James church) — 

Revere st. (Jamaica Plain), edgestones, remonstrance a 514 
Rhoades, T. M. et al. — 

King St., petition to put in order a 349 
Rhodes, A. H.— 

Rockland st., sidewalks, petition a 297 ; order passed 317 
Rice, Augustus M. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Rice, E. E.— 

Stable, permit a 48 
Rice & Hutchins — 

Troy St., sidewalk, petition a 209 ; order passed a 248 
Rice, Samuel — 

904-912 Harrison av., retaining wall, petition a 518 
Rich, Richard — 

Maverick st. (ward 2), stable, petition a 189; permit a 212 
Richards, F. G.— 

17 Brighton st. (Charlestown) , sidewalk, petition a 468 ; order 
passed 500 
Richards, Sylvester — 

Movement of wooden building from junction of Blue Hill av. 
and Norfolk st. to Milton line (ward 24), petition a 327 ; 
permit 350 
Richardson, Charles, et al.— 

Lincoln St., paving, petition a 189; order passed 430 
Richardson, Charlotte A. — 

13 Laurel St., sidewalks, petition a 480 ; order passed 500 
Richardson, F. A. — 

Middlesex, Castle and Emerald sts., sidewalks, petition a 443; 
older passed 458 
Richardson, Sarah L., administratrix — 

489, 491, and 593 Saratoga st., sidewalks, petition a 297; order 
passed 317 
Richmond street (Dorchester) — 

Edgestones, gutters, petition a 77 ; remonstrance a 109 

Stable : petition a 480 

Telephone poles : between Dorchester av. and Washington St., 
permit a 589 
Richmond street — 

Paving between Fulton and Commercial sts., petition a 456; 
order passed 467 
Ricker, B. F. et al.— 

Rockland st., water pipe, petition a 443; permit 458; deed 
relating to same a 574, c 576 
Ricker, Lewis C. — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall No. 103 and cellar No. 20 
a 558 
Rickley, Maria — 

Burroughs St., sewer, abatement a 335 
Ridgeway lane — 

Paving : petition a 400 
Riedell, James A. et al. — ■ 

Newbury St., macadamizing, edgestones, petition a 59; order 
passed 416 
Ring, Albert F. — 

Revere st. (ward 23), sewer, petition a 109 

Elm St., crossing opposite Hillside school-house, petition a 241 
Ring, Franklin — 

Ware st., edgestones, petition a 499 
Ring, Margaret — 

Wiaship st. (Brighton), grade damages, petition a 365; leave 
to withdraw 574 



Ripley, TV. V.— 

175 Blue Hill av., edgestones, petition a 514 ; order passed 521 
Ritchie, Uriah — 

Union park, declaration respecting deed a 300 
River street (ward 24) — 

Grading, etc. a 43 

Widening: damages a 415, 425, 587 

Grade damages : petition a 514 
River street — 

Grading : damages a 456 

Plank walk : petition a 613 
Riverside street — 

Stables: petition a 443; permit 458 

Wooden addition to building, Nos. 20-22, petition a 591, c 601 
Roach, Richard — 

Pay of James F. Roach, deceased a 402, c 405 
Roach, Richard, et al. — ■ 

Cooper St., between Charlestown St. and Stillman pi., paving, 
petition a 425 

North Margin st. near Lafayette av., edgestones, petition a 514 
Roanoke avenue (Jamaica Plain) — 

Telegraph posts a 127 
Robbins, Henry C. — ■ 

Appointed public weigher a 400 
Robbins, Nathan — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of cellar No. 18, a 44; transfer7 
of stalls 97 and 99, a 690 
Robbins, Nathan, et al.— 

Commercial St., sewer between Prince and Hanover sts., macad- 
amizing, petition a 365; order for hearing 387; hearing 
400 ; order passed 415 
Robbins, Shepard & Co. — 

Tileston's wharf, dredging, petition a 297 
Roberts, John, heirs of — 

117 Leverett St., sidewalks, petition, a 174; report and order a 198 
Robertson, John — 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Robie, John — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Robie, John, et al. — 

Forest Hills avenue, Sanford, Temple, and Cedar streets (Dor- 
chester), petition a 43 
Robinson & Emerton — 

Passenger wagon from Haymarket square to Litchfield's wharf, 
etc., petition a 139 ; permit a 176 
Robinson, Edward F. — 

Nominated assessor c 92; elected a 93, c 99 
Robinson, George E. — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall No. 27 a 416 ; transfer of 
stall No. 24, and cellar No. 8 a 416 
Robinson, Hiram B. — 

Brook av., reconveyance of land, petition a 258 
Robinson, J. S. et al.— 

Avon st. (ward 23), lamps, petition a 618 
Robinson, L. C. — 

15 Wendell St., melting furnaces, petition a 676 ; permit 700 
Robinson, W. F. & Co. et al.— 

South Market st. east of Commercial St., petition to renumber 
a 586 
Robinson, Walter S. — 

Warren st., relocation, $49 damages a 212 
Roby, W. G. & Co.— 

52 Fulton St., steam engine, petition, order notice a 519 ; hear- 
ing, permit 551 
Rockland avenue — 

Edgestones : petition a 456 ; order passed 467 
Rockland street — 

Sidewalks : petitions a 297 ; orders passed 317 
Rockland street (ward 25) — 

Petition to put in order a 43 

Grading, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks: order passed a 300 

Water pipe : petition a 443 ; permit 458 

Sidewalk : petition a 465 ; order passed 483 
Rockview street (Jamaica Plain) — 

Grading : petition a 327 
Rockwell street (ward 24) — 

Grading, sidewalks, etc. ^petition a 425 

Lamps : petition a 425 
Rodocanachi, J. H. — 

Brookline av., crosswalk, petition a 209, report a 217 
Roe, Edward J. et al. — 

Culvert St., macadamizing, gutters, sidewalks, petition a 155 
Rogers, Abraham T., councilman (ward 22) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on treatment of poor 11 ; surveyor's 
department 348 

Remarks : 

250th anniversary 478 
Soup for the poor 621 
Rogers, Ellen E.— 

Gardner st. (Brighton), edgestones, petition a 258, report and 
order a 281 
Rogers, J. Austin, et al.— 

Eliot sq., sprinkling, petition a 213 
Rogers, John — 

Appointed constable a 456 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Rogers, John, heirs of— 

Kennard av., sewer, S3. 78 abatement a 212 
Rogers, Patrick II.— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Station st. (Roxbury), grading, petition a 383 
Rogers, William 1!. < t al. — 

Institute of Technology and Natural History Society, care of 
niul adornment of grounds, petition a 174, c 181 
Rogers avenue (ward 22) — 

Wooden building : movement from West Chester park to near 
Bay View pi., petition a 543; permit 558 
Rothe, Michael, devisees of — 

South St., widening, $9400 damages, order passed a 335 
Ronndy, William A. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Howe, Joseph II. — 

Childs st. (ward 23), sewer, petition a 456 
Rowe, Joseph II. it al. — 

Chillis .-t., lamps, petition a 468 
Rowe, Joseph R. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Rowlan I, Mrs. Anna — 

Cuius ton pl.,edgestones,sidewalks,petition a 4S0; order passed 500 
Roxburv canal— 

Abating nuisance a 47, c 49, 71, a 128, c 130, a 210, c 220, a 666, 

c 670, a OSl.c 692 
Injury to wharf by dredging, petition a §3, c 99 
Order from State to dredge a 241 
Harbor-master— see Harbor 
Roxbury Qaslight Company — 
Contract authorized a 214 
Kast Chester park extension, damages a 352 
Roxbury street — 

Sprinkling: petition a 213 

" Portion,'' order passed a 248 
Royce, Burnham — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Rudolph, Fred, et al. — 

Petition fer lamps a 13 
Ruggles street — 

Sidewalks : from Shawmut av. to Cnbot St., petition a 59 

At 142. petition a 4'.5 ; order passed 447 
Stable: No. 164, petition a 686; permit 616 
Rules and orders — 

.loint special committee a 2 

Ofalderinen — of 1379, adopted 2; committee2; report 12 

Of council — of 1S79, adopted 3 ; committee 3; report 6 ; adopted 

7,23,37,63 
Join t— of 1S79— adopted a 2, c 3 ; report c 7 ; adopted c 7, a 12, 

14, c IS, 23, a 26; ameudment c 642, a 543 
Anteroom of bourd of aldermen reserved a 15, 30 
Recess during elections c 67 
Thirteenth joint rule c 74 
Reducing motions to writing c 411, 420 
Decisions on points of order: — 

Council — accepting a report adopts it c 18, 19 

Debate not in order when solving a doubt c 54 
Reports Of nominating committees not subject to further 
action c 121, 153 

tion of assistant assessors on separate ballots c 160 
Right of member not voting to give notice of motion to 
reconsider 676, 681 
Rumery, William H. — 

Essex st., extension, S3950 damages a 402 
Russell, Henry S. — 

Police commissioner, resignation a 155 
Russell, Julia — 

West Ninth st., abatement of sidewalk assessment a 145 
Russell, Samuel II. et al. — 

Doane st., repairs, etc., petition a 465 
Ru.-t, William A. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Rutherford avenue — 

Crosswalk : petition a 174 
Driveway into estate, petition a2'.)7 

Claims : Margaret Maloney, injuries, petition a 276, c 283 ; leave 
to withdraw a 388, c 390 
Mary Maloney, injuries, petition a 295 
Wooden building: petition a 327, c 337; permit a 350, c 354 
Lamp : between Nos. 61 and 63, petition a 456 
Stable : near Lincoln St., petition a 586 ; permit 616 
Rutland street — 

Passage-way leading to Concord St., removal of tree, petition 
a 456; leave to withdraw 634 
Ryan, .1. T. clal.— 

Old Roxbury canal, abatement of nuisance, report a 128, c 130 
Ryder, Christopher C. — 

Elected second assistaut assessor a 155. c 161 
Ryder, V. W. & Bon, el al.— 

Windsor st., plank walk, petition a 668 
Ityerson, S. C. — 

171 Blue Hill av., edgestoncs, petition a 514 ; order passed 621 

Safford, James 0. & Co. — 

Interest on money held under trustee process, petition a 13, 
C 16; leave to withdraw a 96, c 99 



Sagamore street (Dorchester) — 

Grading a 26 
Salaries — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 13 

Report of committee on salaries a 123, c 136, 149, a 156 

Inspector of vinegar a 241, c 249, 396, 411, a 415, 467 

Inspector of milk a 299 

Superintendent of Charles-river bridge a 514, c 623, 536 

Deputy collectors, petition for increase a 26; order c 675, a 677, 

c092 
Assistant registrars of voters and clerks, $2000 additional 

c 564, a 668, 587, c 601 
Superintendents of Chelsea bridge (north) a 403, c 405, 504, 
523, 548, a 554, 587, c 601, 625, a 629, c 652, 670, a 676 
Salem street. (Charlestown) — 

Omnibuses : extension of route to Sullivan sq., petition a 456 ; 
referred to next board of aldermen 700 
Sanborn, Mary A. — 

Williams st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 533 ; permit 547 
Sanford street (Dorchester) — 

Petition to put in order a 43 
Saratoga street — 

Sidewalks : petition a 139 

Xos. 489-493, petition a 297; order passed 317 
Revised grade : order passed to establish between Bremen and 

Moore sts. a 300 
Wooden building : movement from No. 64 to Border St., petition 
a 327 ; permit 367 
Moving to Curtis st., petition a 468 
Plank walk, etc. a 69 
Culvert : petition a 443 ; report 471 

Grading : between Moore and Wordsworth sts., order passed a 458 
Saunders, 0. L — 

Camden st., between Tremont st. and Providence R.R. grade, 
petition c 548, a 554 ; report a 614, c 621 
Savin Hill avenue — 

Tracks : order of notice a 317 ; hearing 349 ; permit 404 
Sawin, John P. — 

Appointed deputy sealer of weights and measures a 109 
Deceased a 3ti5 
Sawyer, Henry N., councilman (ward 24) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Elected : finance committee 7 

Appointed : committee on streets 11 ; treatment of poor 11 ; pav- 
ing 11 ; celebration of 250th anniversary 49 
Remarks : 

Street crossings 20 

Lamb's map of Boston 21 

Assessors' department 58 

Notices of committee meetings 99 

Appropriation bill 184 

250th anniversary 228, 463 

Square at Meeting-house Hill 229, 296 

ny brook 272 
SUreot nomenclature 273 
Printing registration laws 274 
Charlestown almshouse 284 
Free use of ward-rooms 418 
Committee on legislative matters 564, 578 
Repeal of charter provision for general meetings of legal 

voters 565 
Pay of laborers for thanksgiving 584 
Enlargement of City hospital 605 
Soup for t lie poor 621 
Revised ordinances 641,654 
Treatment of the poor 672 
Sawyer, Henry N. — 

Thornley, corner Pleasant st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 213 
586 ; permit 616 
Sawyer, Henry N. et al. — 

Faneuil Hall, use of, petition a 349, 456; report in favor 471 
Sawyer, Horace A. — 

Appointed culler of hoops and staves a 214, c 222 
Sawyer, John P. — 

24 Harvard St., projection of lantern, petition a 241 ; permit 
a2Sl 
Sawyer, Nathan, councilman (ward 18) — 
(laths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on claims 11 ; printing 11 ; public institu- 
tions 11 ; funeral of councilman Perkins 634 
Remarks : 

First assistant assessors 147 
Removing fences enclosing public grounds 268 
250th anniversary 454, 475 
Revised ordinances 661 
Scales, city — 

Superintendents appointed a 189 
Quarterly report north scales a 28, 245 
Scales, Lucy D., heirs of— 

Washington st. (Brighton), relocation, $225.75 damages a 46 
Schafer, John W. A.— 

15 Mechanic st., edgestones and sidewalk, petition a 109 
Schleicher, John, et al. — 

Benton st., petition to put in order a 155 
School street — 

Petition to put in order a 59 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LI 



School street (Charlestown) — 

Vacant land, sale authorized a 143 
Schools — 

Public instruction, joint standing committee c 11, a 12 
Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 
Furniture, repairs, etc., authorized a 30, c 31, 54 
Conventions of hoard of aldermen and school committee a 62, 

471,499 
Prince, additional accommodations c 5, a 247, c 249, 272, a 664, 

c670 
Additional appropriation — see Appropriations 
Powers of school-committee — see Legislative matters 
Evening schools c 32, a 43, 95, c 99 
Chapman school-house c 40, a 43 
Cottage pi. school-house c 90, a 93, c 122, a 125 
Milldam primary school building c 90, a 93, c 122, a 125 
Mason st. building, safe or vault c 90, a 93, c 324, 341, a 349 
East Boston high school c 106, a 110 ; see Buildings 
School taxes— see Taxes 
Wall-street school nuisance a 116, c 120, 136 
School expenditures printing argument of J. L. Stackpole 

c 123, a 125, c 238, a 243 
Sanitary condition of Sherwin and other school-houses a 109, 

c 120, 137. a 140, c 146, a 177, c 181, 201, a 211 
Primary school near Ashmont station c 238, a 243, 665 
Egleston-square grammar school-house a 247, c 249, 292 
Primary school-house in vicinity of Elmo st. c 256, 272, a 276, 

c423, a 426, 665 
Primary school-house in vicinity of Seventh and D sts., c 256, 

a 258 
Inquiry respecting contracts c 364, a 365 ; report a 664, c 670 
Truants and absentees from school — see Institutions 
Statue of "Victory," c410, a 415, c 420, a 427 
Lowell district c 490, a 499, c 504 
Dillaway district c 490, a 499, c 504 
Wall-st. school c 490, a 499 
West Newton st., city land, request for school-house referred 

a 109, c 120 ; report, referred to next city council a 515, c 523 
Lincoln school-house, enlargement of yard, request referred 

a 109, c 120 ; report inexpedient a 352, c 354 
Egleston sq. school-house, drainage a 109, c 137 
Howe primary, petition of teachers for sidewalks on Fifth St., 

between B and C sts., a 174 ; report and order a 198 
Franklin school-house, request of school committee for new 

floors and new blackboards a 189, c 200 
School-houses, additional appropriations c 503, a 514, 519, c 523, 

536, a 665, c 670, a 681, c 692 
English High and Latin school building : 

Window glass a 112, c 120, 136 

Request that walls be tinted c 536, a 543 

Evening high school, request for rooms a 213, c 220, a 515, 
519, 694 

Request for inscription upon Latin school-house a 383, 
c390 

Gift of marble group by II. P. Kidder a 568, c 576, a 588, 
c601 

South-end branch library a 587, 591, c 601, 622, 638, a 649 
Prince-st. school-house, request for window ventilators a 213, 

c220 
Lawrence school-house, request for improvements a 213, c 220 

Defective drainage, claim, leave to withdraw a 280, c 283 
Adams school-house, request for master's office a 213, c 220 ; 

report inexpedient c 295, a 297 
Bunker hill school-house, request for master's office a 213, 

c 220; report inexpedient c 295, a 297 
School-houses in sixth division, request for water-closets and 

sinks a 213, c 220 
Bigelow school-house, request for ventilation a 213, c 220 
Shurtleff and Norcross school-houses, request for ventilating 

flues a 213, c 220 
Lincoln, Gaston and Andrew school-houses, request for heating 

and ventilating apparatus a 213, c 220 
Hillside school-house, request for water-closets and ventilation 

of cellar a 213, c 220 
Central school, request for repairs in yard and building a 213, 

c220 
Wall st. school-house, notice of abandonment a 276, c 283 
Attachment of filter to water-pipes in school-houses, petition 

a 383, c 390 
Thetford av. school-house, furniture, petition a 383, c 390 
Eustis st. primary school-house, sanitary condition complaint 

a 3S3, c 390 
Avon-pl. school, additional accommodations, petition a 3S3, 

c 390 ; report a 515, c 523 
King-st. primary school, drainage, grade of yard, petition 

a 468, c 475 
Loan of text-books to pupils, petition a 468, c 475 ; report re- 
ferred a 664, c 670 
Ticknor school-house, evening school, petition a 518, c 523 
Gaston district, primary site, order passed a 555, c 559, 576 
Sale of impure prints— see Police 
Members of school committee elected, report a 665 
Prince school-house, enlargement of yard, petition c 601, a 613 
Blossom-st. Primary school-house, purchase of land in rear, 

petition c 601, a 613; referred to next city government 

a 664, c 670 



Dorchester (Everett) district, additional primary school ac- 
commodations, petition c 601, a 613 
Tileston school, water pipe through yard, order passed a 630, 

c 635 
Shurtleff school-house estate, iron fence, petition a 258; boun- 
dary adjusted a 666, c 670 
Limitation of expenditures to appropriations c 674, a 678, 

c 694, a 700 
Reorganization of school committee a 681; indefinitely post- 
poned c 693 
Schwarz, Louis B. — 

Refunding taxes a 13, c 16 ; leave to withdraw a 665, c 670 
Scollard, John J. — 

Contestant of seat of John E. Bowker (ward 16), c 6, 32 
Scott, W.— 

2132 Washington st., hoisting beam, petition a 139 
Scribner, Lucy Ella — ■ 

10 Cedar st. (Charlestown), sidewalk, petition a 258; report 

and order a 281 
Sealer of weights and measures — see Weights and Measures 
Sears, George T.— 

Blackstone Bank building, druggist's mortar, petition a 327 ; 
permit 352 
Sears, J. Henry — 

East Chester park (ward 20), stable, petition a 213 
Sears, J. Henry et al. — 

Humphrey, Boston and Cottage sts., sprinkling, petition a 230 
East Chester park, from Albany st. to Five Corners, grading, 
etc., petition a 258 
Seaver, Frederick — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Seaver, Jacob W. — 

Washington st. (ward 23) edgestones, petition a 327; order 
passed 350 
Seaver, Nathaniel, et al. — 

Maverick sq. (E.B.), removal of urinal, petition a 425, c 436; 
report a 547, c 548 
Seaver, N.— 

Liverpool st., removal of tracks, petition a 456 
Seaver, Robert & Sons, et al. — 

Manning's Hill, Centre st. (Jamaica Plain), petition to allow 
coasting a 649 
Seaver, William — 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Seaver street — ■ 

Plan of land between Warren St., Blue Hill av., Seaver St., 
Walnut av., Townsend st., petition a 174, c 181 
Seaverns, Daniel — 

11 Sheridan av., stable, petition a 209 ; permit a 216 
Seaverns avenue — 

Grading, gravelling a 26 

Macadamizing, etc., petition a 93 ; order passed 403 
Sidewalk : remonstrance a 456; leave to withdraw 467 
Second street — 

Stables : petition a 124 ; permit a 159 

petition 514; permit 534 
Sewer : petition a 139, c 146 
Petroleum, etc. : license a 197 

Grading and gravelling: between P and Q sts., order passed a 317 
Seventh street — 

Macadamizing : between B and D sts. a 43 

Primary school-house : between C and D sts. c 256, a 258, c 398, 

a 400 
Sidewalk : corner C st., order passed a 317 
Edgestone, sidewalk : petition a 349 ; order passed 367 
Sewall Day Cordage Company — 

Parker St., crosswalks, petition a 26; leave to withdraw a 47 
Sewers — 

Standing committee a 12 

Annual report of superintendent a 62 

Superintendent elected a 64, c 87 

Drainage of Muddy river a 266 

Damages : petition of James B. Smith c 106 

Front of old poor-house estate (Dorchester), $544.78 transfer 

a 177, c 181, 201 
Lewis wharf corporation, sewage deposits in dock, petition a 258 
Sewer improvements at East Boston, petition a 327 
Taking lauds of Cora L. Shaw, William Gray and others, order 

notice a 500 ; hearing 518 
Adams St., hearing a 276; order passed 282 
Allston St., between Melville av. and Mather St., order notice 

a 415 ; hearing 426 ; order passed 446 
Auburn St., abatement a 77, 98, 335 
Burroughs st., abatements a 47, 98, 335 ; assessment 98 
Brook av., reconveyance of land, petition of II. B. Robinson 

a 258 
Blue Hill av., between Quincy st. and Lawrence av., petition 

a 551 
C St., between Fourth and Fifth sts., petition a 42a 
Cazeuove place, petition a 102; order notice 144; hearing 155; 

order passed 212 
Cambridge st. (Brighton), abatements a 112, 558 
Camden St., Metropolitan R. Co., petition a 213; hearing 276; 

order passed 282 
Chelsea st. (Charlestown), between Perry and Mcdford sts., 

petition a 213 



LIT 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Centre and Pond sts., appeals from assessments, a 124, 276; 
petition, request lor special committee, leave to withdraw 
S33, 473; abatement 144. 174, 574; assessment 144 

Centre st., between Lamartine and Wise place, petition a 276; 
order notice 317; hearing 327 ; order passed 402 

" Commercial and other streets," hearing a 276 

Commercial, between Shamrock and Linden sts., order passed 

Commercial, between Prince and Hanover sts., " macadamiz- 
ing," petition a 365; order notice 387; hearing 400; order 

passed 415 
ChiUls st., abatements 335 
Coleman St. (Dorchester;, petition a 456 
Childs st. (ward 23), petition a 456 ; order of notice 500; bearing 

514 ; order passed 534 
Centre st. to Orchard st., remonstrance a 465; order notice 467 
Crawford st., petition a 108 ; report { 
Cambridge st. (Brighton), abatement a 472 
Change av., abatement and assessment a 515 
Downer st. (Itoxbury) , petition a 211 ; hearing 276; order passed 

300 
Downer St., discharge into Brookline sewer a 266 
Downer av., petition a 13 ; order notice 216, 230 ; hearing 241 
Dix St., petition a 425; order notice 446; heariug 456; order 

I 467 
Devon st., between Blue Hill av. and Warren St., petition 

a 425 ; order Dl 
Elmore st. and walnut av., petition a 174; hearing 276; order 

passed 800 
Essex St., extension (formerly South-st. court), order notice 

a 415 ; bearing 126 I order passed 446 
Kllery St., petition a 413 
East Fifth St., 126 ft. from O St., petition a 468: order notice 

, hearing 514 : order passed 534 
Enfield st. (U.R.), petition a 465; order for hearing 472; 

hearing 4*0 ; order passed 500 
Francis .st., discharge into Brookline sewer a 26'i ; damages 402 
Forest Bills st., petition a 174 ; bearing 276; order i 
Fort av., petition a 414, 425 : order notice 415 ; heariug 42ti 
Foster St., petition a 514 ; order | 
Greenwich place (ward 24). petition a 25S ; order notic. 

hearing 297 ; order passed 317 
Glen road, petition a 44.; ; ord«r for hearing 458 ; hearing 465; 

order passed 47'." 
Gaston >t., abatement a 558 
Greenwood av. (ward Co), a 568 
Harwich st., petition and order notice a 435; hearing 443; order 

passed 168 
Hancock st. (Cbarlestown), petition a 414; order notice 415; 

hearing 4^6 ; order passed 429 
Hoi brook St., petition a 468; iemonstrance499 
Henchman st., petition a 499 ; order passed 500 
Heath Bt., petition a 54;; 
High st. (Charles town), petition a 586 ; order notice 617 ; hearing 

" 629 
Jamaica st., abatement a 98 
Kuapp -t., petition a 468; order passed 472 
Eennard av., abatements a 212, ;J35, 547, 558 

Assessments a 3:15, 547, 558 
Linden st. (ward 24), petition a 124 ; order notice 144 ; hearing 

166 ; order pal 
Lincoln >t. (ward 24) , petition a 230 : hearing 276 ; order passed 

Lee st. (ward 23), between Childs and Keyes sts., petition 

a 241 ; remonstrance 258; order notice 282; hearing 297 ; 

order passed 317 
Linden st. ( Brighton), abatement a 472 
Myrtle st. (ward 23), petition a 124 ; order notice 144 ; hearing 

i , order passeil 212 
Melville av., petition a 414; order notice 415; hearing 426; 

Order passed -Hi) 
North square, abatement and assessment a 47 
Ninth and M sts., abatement a 77, 144 
Neponset av., from Walnut and Taylor sts., petition a 276; 

Older notice 317 ; bearing 327 
New Lamartine St., petition a 568 ; order notice 617; hearing 629 
Orchard St. ;W. It.), petition a 456; remonstrance 4C5; order 

notice 4>57 ; heariug 46s 
Park Bt. (ward 24), petition a 109; order notice 144; hearing 

155; order passed 212 
Phillips St., abatement and assessment a 98 
Pleasant Bt. (ward 24), between Pond and Pearl sts., petition 

a 241 ; hearing 276; order passed 282 
Palmer st., petition a 258; order notice 282; hearing 297; order 

I 300 
Pond and Centre sts., appeals from assessments a 124, 276; 

petition, request tor special committee, leave to withdraw 

383, >7:;; abatement 144, 174, 574; assessment 144 
Parker .-'. town;, petition a 297; older notice 317; 

remonstrance .'(27 ; hearing 327 ; order passed 415 
Porter St., relaying from Bremen st to outlet, petition a 'J'.i7 
Pembroke St., between Tremont st. and Columbus sq., petition 

a 849 
Pembroke st.,from Warren av. to No. 95, order notice a 402; 

hearing 414; order passed 415 
Parker Bt. (Charlestown), petition a 456 



Pearl st. (Dorchester), petition a 533; order notice 534; hearing 

543 ; order passed 547 
Revere st. (ward 23), petition a 109; order notice 144 ; hearing 

155 ; order passed 212 
Reed's court (Itoxbury), order passed a 300 
Reading St., petition a 443 
Sunderland st. (ward 21), petition a 124; order notice 144; 

hearing 166 
Second St., petition a 139 
St. James av., petition a 414; order notice 415; hearing 426; 

order passed 446 
Spring lane ( W.R.), abatement a 472 
Tremont Bt., near Phillips st., petition a 327 ; order notice 402 ; 

hearing 414 ; order passed 415 
Tremont st, abatement and assessment a 98; hearing a 276; 

order passed 300 
Tiles ton's wharf, dredging, petition a 297 
Upton St., surface drain, petition a 109 
Walnut av. and Elmore St., petition a 174 ; hearing 276 ; order 

1300 
Wilmont st., petition a 109; order notice 144; hearing 155; 

order passed 300 
Ward st., abatement and assessment a 47, 446 
Woodman St., abatement a 112, 586, 604 

hington St., Nos. 375-377, appeal from assessment a 124 
-. 107-409, appeal from assessment a 124, 144 
Washington, between Ruggles and Eustis sts., petition 155 

bearing 276; order passed 282 
West Canton St., west of Columbus av., repair, petition a 230 

order passed 335 
Washington st. (ward 24), from School to Harvard St., peti- 
tion a 276 
White av., (W.R.), between Woodman and Centre sts., order 

notice a 467 ; hearing 46S 
Walden St., petition a 543 
Improved sewerage — 

Joint special committee a 2, c 4, 312 

ltoxburv canal, abating nuisance a 47, c 49, 71, a 128, c 130, 
a 210, c 2 
Injur) to wharf by dredging, petition a 93, c 99 
to lloblitzell, Condon, & Iloblitzell a 94, c 99 

t lommittee authorized to continue construction a 94, C 99 

Ordinance respecting boats and lighters c 146, a 156, c 173, 
a 174 

Right to use excavating machinery a 199, c 200, 224, a 243 

Removal of tire reservoir a 317, c 319 

Taking land in Quincy a 520, C 523, a 551, 559 

Mt. Vernon st. (ward 21), damages a 188, c 200, a 816, c319, 
a 353, c 354 

Wiaeham aud Plympton sts., damages a 1S9, c 200, a 315, 

Personal injuries, petition of John Joyce a 365, c 370; leave 
to withdraw a 690, 692 
Petition of Robert Thompson a400,c 405; leave to with- 
draw a 690, c 602 
Hampshire st., damages, petition a 468, c 475; leave to with- 
draw a 589, c 601 
Dorchester av., damages, petition a 4< 8, c 475 
Modification of contract for building Dorchester bay tunnel 

authorized c 674, a 676 
Injuries to business, petition of Charles H. Carr, a 468, 

c 475 ; leave to withdraw a 690, c 692 
Widening Commercial st ., payment for drains a 688 
Seventeenth of June — see Boston celebrations 
Sexton, John — 

150 Athens St., sidewalk, petition a 543 
Seymour, Robert G. et nl. — 

_les st., sidewalks, petition a 59 
Shannaban, Michael — 

Lee St., sewer, remonstrance a 258 
Shapleigb, J. W.— 

90 West Cottage st, edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 349, order 
I 357 
Shapleigb, J. W. & J. M.— 

202 Commonwealth av., sidewalk, petition a 413; order passed 

Shapleigb, S. & J. W.— 

uid260 Commonwealth av., sidewalk, petition a 241 
Sbaugbnessy, Thomas P.— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Shaw, Cora L. — 

Taking lands, order of notice a 500 
Shaw, (J. Edward— 

Deceased, payment of due to widow c 648, a 649 
Shaw, Qeorge A. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 120, a 124, c 130, a 139, c 147, 
a 156, c 160, a 175, c 1S1 
Shaw, George A. et al. — 

Bine Hill av., grading, etc., petition a 59 
Shaw, Joseph P. — 

Kliot st., corner Eliot place (ward 23), stable, petition a 230 
, Joseph P. et <U. — 

Green >t., crosswalk at Brookside av., petition a 139 
Shaw, Mrs. Pauline A. — 

Cottage place school-house, kindergarten school c 90, a 93, 
c 122 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LIII 



Shaw, William — 

Dix St., sewer, petition a 425; order notice 446; hearing 456; 
order passed 467 
Shawmufc avenue — 

Claims : personal injuries a 109, e 120, a 246, c 249, 694, a 700 

No. 197, taxes, estate forfeited a 112, c 120 

Steam engine: at No. 824, petition and order of notice a 126; 

hearing 174; permit 146 
No. 327, lantern and druggist's mortar a 174, 197 
Telegraph poles : petition a 349 

Drinking fountain : junction Tremont street, petition a 413 
Crossing: at German Catholic church, petition a 499; report 
521 
Shay, Thomas — 

65 Bartlett st. (ward 21), stahle, petition a 241 ; permit 402 
Shea, James B. — 

Essex st., personal injuries, petition a 629, c 635 
Shea, John — 

Appointed: measurer of wood and bark a 139; public weigher 
a 139 
Shea, Mary — 

Personal injuries a 13, c 16 
Shea, Patrick H.— 

Kenuard av., sewer, abatement a 212, 335 
Shedd, Albert A. et al.— 

O st., between Fourth st. and Broadway, edgestones, sidewalks, 
petition a 543 
Sheehan, David II. — 

Pay for services, petition a 59, c 66; leave to withdraw a 84, 
c86 
Shelhamer, Victoria — 

127 West Sixth st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 258; report 
and order a 281 
Shepard, Harvey N., councilman (ward 1) — 
Oaths of ofnce 1 
Elected : president of common council 2 

Manager Old South Association c 18, a 29 
Appointed: committee on harbor defences 44; funeral of 

councilman Perkins 634 
Remarks : 

Addresses 2, 696 

Death of councilman Joseph Healy 219 
Death of councilman Perkins 634 
Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 669 
Shepard street (Brighton) — 

Edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, between Union and Washington 
sts. ; also macadamizing ; order passed a 300 
Sheppard, Patrick P.— 

16 Hayward pi., projection of lantern, petition a 213; permit 
a 246 
Sheridan avenue — 

Stable : petition a 209 ; permit a 216 
Sherman, Amory F. — 

Poplar st. corner Albion st. (ward 23), stable, petition a 383; 
permit 415 
Sherman, Samuel S. — 

Constable, bond approved a 62 

Appointed constable a 481; reconsideration and rejection 485 
Sherwin, Thomas — 

Nominated and elected collector of taxes a 280, c 292 
Shuman, A. & Co. — 

440 Washington St., lamp-post, petition a 443 ; permit a 458 
Shurtleff, Augustine, et al. — 

Rutherford av., crosswalk at Lincoln St., petition a 174 
Sibley, Edwin, councilman (ward 5) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed: committee on joint rules and orders 3, 542; rules 
and orders of common council 3; common 11; surveyor's 
department 11 
Elected : director for public institutions a 29, c 31 
Remarks : 

Rules and orders of common council 6, 38, 53 

Joint rules and orders 10, 19 

Old State House 17 

Assessors' department 58 

Recess during elections 67 

Decoration of army and navy monument 91 

Pay of laborers 106 

Salaries of city officers 149 

Badges 152 

Extension of Broadway 170 

Bridge to Oharlestown 181, 205 

Appropriation bill 183 

Death of Joseph Kenney 203 

Second assistant assessors 208 

City forester's greenhouse 220, 233 

Fourth of July celebration 223, 355 

Trustees of City hospital 273 

New court-house 311 

Barrel wagons 338, 356 

Reducing motions to writing 420 

Flagstaff on Lewis park 421 

250th anniversary 441, 478 

Discharging of vessels in the stream 475 

Repairs on the council chamber 476 

Public parks 541 



Pay of laborers for thanksgiving 584 

Death of councilman Perkins 633 
Silloway, Charles E. — 

Appointed second assistant city messenger a 189, c 200 
Sim, Agnes D. — 

Albany st., at Oak St., personal injuries, petition a 189, c 200 
Simmons, Simon — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Simms, Sarah — 

Auburn St., sewer, abatement a 335 
Simonds, David — 

Faneuil Hall market, transfer of stall No. 58 a 128 

Columbia St., relocation between Blue Hill av. and Washington 

St., $225 damages a 352 
Simonton & Gill, et al. — 

Bunker Hill st. , crossing from Marion st., petition c 410, a 413 
Simpson, Thomas J. et al. — 

Tudor st., from C to D st., sidewalks, etc., petition a 139; 

order passed 317 
Siuclair, A. T. — 

Fuller st. (ward 24), stable, petition a 349; permit 367 
Sinking funds — 

Commissioner elected a 212, c 222 

Appropriations required a 97 

Annual report c 307 

Commissioner requested to report c 347, a 349 

Notice of demand on treasurer to make good deficiency, referred 

a 586, c 601 ; communication from treasurer, referred a 614, 

c 621 ; report, order passed directing city solicitor to take 

action to recover deficiency c 648, a 649 
Sixth street — 
Paving a 189 

South Boston Railroad Co., temporary track a 258, 281 
Skillings, D. N.— 

Newbury st., extension, $10000 damages a 111 

Heirs, extension of Newbury St., $10000 damages a 265; 

assumption of taxes a 317, c 319, 340 
Skinner, Frank H. et al. — 

Marlborough St., macadamizing petition a 13 

872 Marlborough St., edgestones, sidewalks, petition a 425 ; 

order passed 447 
Skinner, J. H. et al. — 

Sagamore st. (Dorchester), grading, petition a 26 
Slack, Walter S.— 

62j Leverett st., personal injuries, petition a 189, c 200 
Slade, Lucius, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on improved sewerage 2; state aid 2 

joint rules and orders 2, 543; armories 12; markets 12 

paving 12; public buildings 12 ; public institutions 12 

public library 13 ; salaries 13 ; inspection of prisons 15 

cheap postage 13 ; Faneuil Hall and county buildings 30, 

new court-house 15 ; revision of charter 44 ; care of hydrants 

211; funeral of alderman Bell 231; fourth of July 243 

seventeenth of June 248; state election returns 545 ; mu 

nicipal election returns 663 
Remarks : 

Record for employment of laborers 43 

Record for superintendent of streets 44 

Waste of water 82 

Bridge to Charlestown 83, 96 

Legislative matters 93 

Sale of lands 95 

City hospital 110 

City engineer 129 

Sherwin school-house 140 

South Boston railroad 179 

Appropriation bill 192 

Pay of laborers 197, 304 

Death of alderman Bell 231 

Excavating machinery 243 

City Point and West Roxbury parks 244, 207, 543 

West Wood Island park 244 

Telegraph and telephone lines 245, 259, 431, 459, 555 

Vandalism on public garden 258 

New court-house 264, 298, 596, 608, 613 

Eaton square 29T, 316 

Burrill claim 300, 368 

Barrel wagons 315, 328,446 

Centre-street sewer 334 

Name for Back-Bay park 335 

Inspector of vinegar 400, 467 

250th anniversary 434, 444, 471 _ 

Rewards for detection and conviction of incendiaries 442 

Inspectors of election 482 

Polling-place in ward 13 485 

Evening high school 515, 519 

Takiug of land in Quincy 521 

Plank walk on Longwood av., 545 

Constitutional amendment abolishing tax qualification of 
voters 552 

South-end branch library 649 

Transfer of powers to overseers of poor 677 

Repeal of ordinance relating to contracts 677 

Extra pay for clerks and deputy collectors 677 

Location of offices iu city hall 678 



LIV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Expenditures of school committee 6S0 
I, imitation of municipal expenditures 680 
Reorganization of school committee 6S1 
Care of neglected children 
General meeting of voters 691 
Smart, William B. — 

Elected Brst assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Smith & Levins — 

(Diner \\ "orcestcr st. and Columbus av., standpipe, petition a 209 
Smith & Nevins— 

Sprinkling city streets, petition a 124 
Smith & Porter— 

Spring lane, underground shaft, petition a 213 ; permit a 248 
Smith, Austin R. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Smith, Charles — • 

Appointed constable a 456 
Smith, Charles B. — 

Passenger wagon from Broadway to Oakland gardens, petition 
a 314 ; permit 352 
Smith, Henry, et al. — 

Washington street, plank walk, petition a 43 
Smith, Horace — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 1J4 
Smith, .lames — 

Call st., edgestones, petition a 209; order passed a 248 
Smith, .). A.— 

Virginia av. (ward 24), stable, petition a 443; permit 574 
Smith, .lames B. — 

Sewer, petition for damages c 106 
Smith, J. C— 

74-70 Westminster st., injuries by surface water, leave to 
withdraw e 312, a 314 
Smith, James F. — 

Appointed weigher of coal a 663 
Smith, J. J. — 

78(i Dudley St., sidewalks, petition a 276; order passed 317 
Smith, J. M.— 

Pay for use of horse by police department in 1872, petition 
' c 120, a 125 
Smith, Joanna — 

117 and 1 19 West Sixth st., edgestoncs, sidewalk, petition a 241 
Smith, Robert- 
Hampshire st., sewer, damages, petition a 408, c 475; leave to 
withdraw a 589, c 601 
Smith, Robert Dixon — 

Fourth of .Inly oratiou, thanks for, a 388, c 390 
Smith, Samuel C. — 

Kennard av., sewer, $4.50 abatementa 212; $80.52 abatement 
a 5-17 ; abatement rescinded 558 ; $26.02 abatement a 558 
Smith, Sarah A. — 

23 Warren av., edgestones, petition a 533 ; order passed 558 
Smith, Thomas M. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Smith, W. II. L.— 

Mil! st., near Ashland (ward 24), stable, petition a 514; permit 
519 
Smith, William H.— 

Appointed public weigher a 586 
Smith, William b.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Smith, William N — 

Appointed public weigher a 676 
Smyth, Edwin R — 

Appointed constable for Mass. Soc. for prevention of cruelty to 
children a 4S 1 
Snow, Lucretia A. et al — 

King st., edgestones, remonstrance a 480 
Social law library — see Libraries 
Soldier's relief— sue State aid 
Soley. John — 

Movement of wooden buildings : 232 Bennington st. to 28 
Brooks st. (ward 1), petition a 174 
29 Henchman st. to 7 Henchman St., petition a 297 
450 Commercial st. ( ward 6) , to rear 7 Henchman st., peti- 
tion a 297 
64 Saratoga st. to Border st. near Lexington St., petition a 

827 , permit 367 
" Certain wooden buildings,'' permit to move a 317, 458, 

471, -is:; 
Marginal st. (Grand Junction), to 301 Marginal St., petition 

a 383 ; permit 404 
119 to 124 Marginal St., petition a 465 
Chelsea to Curtis, cor. Pope st., petition a 468 
Saratoga, opposite Curtis st., to Curtis, cor. Pope st., peti- 

i 468 
227 Webster st. to Marginal, near Jeffries st., petition a 468 
Everett st., petition a 518 I permit 521 
From ;•:> Putnam st. to 103 Porter st. (ward 1), petition a 
591 ; permit 650 
Somerset street — 

Crosswalk : petition a 124; permit a 145 
Sommer, Sebastian — 

4 Vinton st., stable, petition a 139 
Soule, Horace II. & Co. — 

537 Atlantic av., hoisting apparatus, petition a 297 



South Bay — 

Nuisance — see Health. 
South street (ward 20) — 

Near Magazine St., wooden building a 43, c 49, 106 
Widening : damages a 446 
Telegraph poles a 514, 534, 535 
South street — 

Basement of store, petition a 499; permit 515 
Claims : personal injuries, petition a 499, c 502 
South street (ward 12) — 

Stable I petition a 77 ; permit a 96 
Running empty cars a 174, 198 

Widening : re<olveand order from street commissioners referred 
a 214, o 220; report, order passed c 239, a 243 ; damages, 
orders passed a 265, 2S1, 300, 335, 352 
Bowditoh sohool-house and land, sale authorized c 411 
South street (ward 24) — 

From Centre to Morton St., edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, 
macadamizing a 77 
South street (ward 23) — 

Poles : between Centre and Walk Hill sts., permit a 631 
South-street court- 
Claims : James Courfrev, injuries to son, petition a 456, c 460 
South Boston (las Light Co.— 
Contract authorized a 545 
South Boston Ice Company- 
Foundry st., corner Dorchester av. (ward 13) , wooden building, 
petition a 327, c 337; permit a 350, c 354 
South Boston Iron Co.— 

Foundry St., nearly opposite Division St., near West Fourth St., 
wooden buildings, petition a 551, c 660 
South Boston Railroad Co. — 

Transfer of route from Channoy to Lincoln st. a 159, 179, 198 

Carsto Providence Railroad station a 217 

28th location accepted a 299 

29th location accepted a 433 

Increase of cars on depot line a 433, 443 

P and Flast First sts. (ward 14), erection of wooden building, 

petition a 124, c 130; permit c 173, a 176, 
P and Second sts., stable, petition a 124; permit a 159, 174, 429; 

sewer, petition a 139, c 146 
P St., from Fourth to First St., etc., tracks, petition a 124; 
report and order of notice a 145 ; hearing a 189 ; order 
passed 267 
Dover St., increase of cars, petition a 155; order passed 630 
Running empty cars around block enclosed bv Kneelaiid, 

South, Beach, and Federal StS. a 174, 19S, 230," 241 
Connection of tracks on Emerson st. and East Broadway, peti- 
tion a 241; hearing 314; permit 430 
Fourth St., between K and L sts., removal of track to centre, 

petition a 241 
Sixth st., temporary track, petition a 258; permit a 281 
East Third, near K St., petition to erect wooden buildings 

c 373, a 383 
P st., from First to Second St., sidewalk, petition a 400; order 

passed 416 
P St., near Second St., stable, petition a 414 
P st., between First and Second sts., removal of trees, petition 

a 165 
East 1 )over St., permit to connect track with Metropolitan a 467 

ocr 1' and First sts., edgestones, Bide walk, petition a 499 
Kneeland st., tracks from Lincoln to Washington st. ; between 
Federal and Lincoln sts.; Lincoln St., between Kneeland 
and Beach sts., petition a 
Additional cars, Washington, Summer, Chauncy, Beach, 
; .1 >ts., order passed a 630 
South Boston Savings Bank — 

211 K st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 568 
South Cedar-street place — 

Petition that it be lighted a 124 
Souther, Henry — 

15 to 25 Emerson St., sidewalk, petition a 400; order passed 416 
South Grove street- 
Claims : personal injuries a 109, c 120 
South Market street — 
Paving : a 77, 521 

Sidewalk : corner Atlantic av., petition a 241 
Petition to renumber east of Commercial st. a 586 
South worth, Asa — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Sowdon, Philip, jr. — 

Sprinkling -treets in South Boston, petition a 1-4 
Spach, Henry F. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Sparhawk street (ward 25) — 

able: petition a 258 ; permit a 281 
Spaulding, E. F. — 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Spear, (jeorge A.— 

Appointed fence-viewer a 214, c 222 
Spear, James X.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Spear, John (I. et al. — 

CormT Oak st. and May pi., lamp, petition a 59 
Spinney, Edwin B. — 

Appointed constable a 456 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LV 



Spooner, N. B. — 

Michigan av., petition for completion a 314 
Sprague, Henry H. — 

Appointed trustee of City hospital a 213, c 222 
Spring lane — 

Underground shaft : petition a 213 ; permit a 248 
Spring Lane (W.R.) — 

Sewer : abatement a 472 
Lamps : petition a 533 
Spring street (ward 23)— 

Stable : a 13, 30 
Spring street — 

Paving: between Allen and Poplar sts., petition a 425; order 
passed 447 
Petition a 468 
Spurr, Foster M. — 

Appointed first assistant city messenger a 189, c 200 
St. Botolph street — 

Grading a 47, c 49, 71 
St. James avenue — 

Sidewalk : petition a 77 

Nos. 62-72, petition a 568 
Sewer: petition a 414; order of notice 415; hearing 426 ; order 
passed 446 
St. Thomas church (ward 23) — 

Woodman st., sewer, abatement, petition a 586; leave to with- 
draw 664 
St. Elizabeth's hospital — see Hospitals 
Stables — 

Estate between Centre and Chestnut sts. and Centre place (ward 

23) a 109, 128 
Between Washington st., Harrison av., Essex and Beach sts. a 

139, 402 
Unnamed st. , near Beaver St., rear Beacon St., a 499, 515 
Place between Neponset av. and Florence st. a 514, 519 
Albany st. (ward 16) a 425, 446 
Albany St., No. 847, a 109, 159 
Adams, cor. Ashmont st. (ward 24) a 365, 388 
Bowdoin, near Colony st. (ward 24) a 124 
Brooks St., No. 24, (ward 2) a 13, 335 
Blue Hillav. (ward 21) a 241, 281 
No. 91, a 3+9, 367 
Near Oakland st. a 414, 429 
Bartlett st. (ward 21) a 241, 402 
Bailey st. (ward 24) a 276, 317 
Beach, near Medford st. (ward 4) a 297, 335, 352 
Bowdoin st. near Union av. a 297, 317 
Bellevue av. (ward 23) a 327, 350 
Beach, near Centre st. (ward 23) a 349, 367 
Basto place, near Salem st. (ward 23) a 414, 429 
Beacon st. rear of 46, a 414, 429 
Brighton av., corner Market st. a 499, 515 
Buckingham st. a 443, 458, 465 
Bainbridge St., near Dale st. (ward 21) a 533, 547 
Burroughs st. (ward 23) a 543, 574 
Beacon st., rear No. 347 a 586, 613, 688 
Beacon St., No. 340 a 613, 649 
Beacon St., No. 342, a 613, 649 
Cabot St., Nos. 215, 217— see Culvert place 
Cabot St., No. 170 (ward 19) a 124 
Commercial St. (ward 24) a 139, 176 
Centre-st. court, nearly opposite Seaverns av. a 314, 350 
Culvert place, a 365, 388, 414, 429 
Child St., a 443, 458 
Chestnut St. (ward 9) a 456, 467 
Condor st. (ward 1) No. 87, a 480, 688 
Corey st. (ward 23) a 480, 500 
Chestnut Hill av. (ward 25) a 499, 515 
Curtis, cor. Pope st. (ward 1) a 514, 534 
Columbia st. (ward 24) a 543, 590 

Cambridge st., rear, opposite Beacon park (ward 25) a 676 
Commonwealth av. No. 120, a 676, 701 
Devon st. (ward 25) a 93, 112 
Dover st. a 327, 402 

Dorchester av., near Greenwich st. (ward 24) a 365, 415 
Dove st. — see F st. 

Dunreath place, corner Warren st. (ward 21) a 499, 515 
Dudley av. (ward 23) a 499, 515 
Dorchester av. (ward 24) a 518, 547 
Dudley st., near Brook place, a 568, 590 
East Chester park (ward 20) a 213 
Eliot St., cor. Eliot place (ward 23) a 230 
Everett St., No. 47 (ward 2) a 349, 415 
Eighth st., No. 271, a 349, 701 
Earl st. (ward la) a 349, 402 
Enfield St. (ward 23) a 414, 429 
Elmore st., corner Wilmot st. a 651, 574 
Fuller St., cor. Milton av. a 43, 65 
First, near I st. (ward 14) a 174, 198 
Federal st. No. 256 (ward 12) a 213 
Fuller st. (ward 24) a 349, 367 
F and Dove sts. (ward 14) a 383, 534 
German st. (ward 23) a 59, 84 
Glen road (ward 23) a 209, 216 
Glendalest. (ward 24) a 442 
Geneva av. (ward 24) a 543, 558 



Heath St., No. 203 (ward 22) a 43, 65 

Howard st., near Hampden (ward 20) a 213 

Howard av. (ward 20) a 414, 467 

Hancock st. (ward 24) a 456, 467 

Jeffries Point (ward 2) a 442, 446 

Jeffries st. a 456, 467 

Kendrick st. ( ward 25) a 586, 616 

Lamartine, corner Wyman St. (ward 22) a 159 

Linden st. (ward 24) a 425 

Lincoln st. (ward 24) a 446 

Lynde st. (ward 7) Nfos. 20 and 22 a 543, 590 

Lexington av., near Washington st. (ward 25) a 613, 630 

Lexington av. (ward 25) a 663 

Mechanic st. a 43, 65 

Melville av. (ward 24) a 174, 198 

Maverick st. (ward 2) a 189, 212 

Maverick st. No. 882 (ward 2) a 189 

Morelaud st. No. 92 (ward 21) a 213 

Maple, near Schuyler st. (ward 21) a 258, 281 

Mt. Pleasant pi., No. 5 a 365, 467 

Market St., (ward 25) a 442, 446 

Millett st. (ward 24) a 480, 500 

Market st. corner Brighton av. a 499, 515 

Mill st., near Ashland a 514, 519 

Market st. (ward 25) a 543, 558 

Mt. Vernon st., near Dorchester st. (ward 15) a 568, 690 

Medford st. a 701 

Newbury st. (ward 11) (Whittier) a 327, 350 

Newbury st. (ward 11) (Gushing) a 213 

Northampton St., No. 82 (ward 18) a 276, 317; No. 79, a 480, 
500 

North Mead st. No. 22 (ward 4) a 297 

North Beacon st. (ward 25) a 499, 515 

Oriole, corner Nasby St. (ward 21) a 26 

Oakland st. (ward 24) a 5i», 84 

Ottawa St., No. 13 (ward 22) a 414, 483 

Preble st., No. 75 (ward 15) a 93, 112 

P and Second st. a 124 

Payson av. (ward 24) a 155 

Plympton st. (ward 17) a 189, 212 

Pynchon St., No. 188 (ward 21) a 213 

Poplar, corner Albion st. (ward 23) a 383, 415 

P, near Second st. a 414, 429 

Pleasant St. (ward 24) a 468, 483 

Pleasant st. (ward 24) a 533, 547 

Park st., near Dorchester ave. a 568, 590 
Pynchon st. a 568 

Riverside St. a 443, 458 
Richmond st. (ward 24) a 480, 500 
Ruggles st. No. 164 a 586, 616 
Rutherford av., near Lincoln st. a 586, 616 
Spring st. (ward 23) a 13 
South st., near Harvard (ward 12) a 77, 96 
Second and P sts. a 124 
Sheridan av., No. 11 a 209, 216 
Sparhawk st. (ward 25) a 258, 281 
Sumner St., rear, near Jeffries st. (ward 2) a 400, 415 
Second, near K st. a 514, 534 

Thornley, corner Pleasant st. (ward 24) a 213, 586, 616 
Taft's pi. (ward 23) a 258, 281 
Tremont St., No. 1278 a 327, 402 
Trenton St., No. 71 a 465, 472 
Taylor st. (ward 24), Neponset a 499, 664 
Townsend St. a 514, 534 
Union, corner W'inship st. (ward 25) a 276 
Union sq. (ward 25), Allston a 633, 547 
Vinton St., No. 4 a 139 
Virginia av. a 365, 388 
Virginia av. a 443, 574 
Virginia av., rear a 649, 664 
Ward st. (ward 20) a 59, 84 
Warren St., No. 645 (ward 21) a 109, 128 
Williams St., No. 26 a 109, 128 
Walton st. (ward 22) a 109, 128 
Washington, near Norfolk st. (ward 24) a 124 
Washington St., corner Melville av. (ward 21) a 189, 212 
Washington, near Richmond st. (ward 24) a 327, 350 
Washington, near Allston st. (ward 25) a 568 590 
Wyman, corner Lamartine st. (ward 22) a 159 
West Cedar st. No. 58 a 314, 547 
Warwick st. a 365, 429 
Whitney st. a 425 
Wordsworth St. a 443, 458 
Woodbine St. a 443, 483 
West Fourth St., No. 134 a 443, 701 
Weston St., No. 19 a 456, 472 
Warren St., corner Dunreath pi. (ward 21) a 499 
Williams st. (ward 24) a 533, 547 
Willard pi. (ward 25) a 568, 590 
Woodbine St., near Warren st. (ward 21) a 613, 630 
Stackpole, Stephen A. — 

Elected overseer of poor c 172, a 175 
Stacy, Benjamin F. el al. — 

Crosswalk from Moulton st. to Bunker Flill St., petition a 121 
Stacey, Benjamin F. — 

Appointed trustee of City hospital a 270, c 292 



LVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Bill allowed c 606, a 613 
Stafford, Albert S.— 

Earl st., lamps, petition a 241 
Stafford, C. [■'. and 11. M. Temple— 

51 liluc Hill ay., sidewalk, petition a 518; order passed 526 
Stafford, E. J.— 

65 Blue Hill av., sidewalk, petition a 518; order passed 546 
Staniford street — 

Passage-way rear of 22-26, petition that it be lighted a 209 
Stanwood, Albeit — 

Appointed member of Boston water board a 209, c 222 
Starbird, G. II. et al. — 

Bunker Hill st. from Tufts to Everett st., sidewalk, petition a 518 
Starrett, William (!.— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Starrett, William N. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
State Aid- 
Committee a 2 

Committee anthorized to make payments a 2, c 19 

Quarterly report of paymaster a 15, 189, 401, 61S 
State street — 

Location of ferry slip a 43, c 49; a 241, c 2-19 

Coiner Washington, grade of sidewalk a 155, 388 

Brazer's building, projection of lantern a 258, 300 

Middlesex U.K. Co., additional cars, petition a 649 
Station street — 

Street commissioners requested to arrange with owners and 
abutters for accepting and laving out c 173, a 175, c 188, 
a 189 

Grading : petitions a 319, 383 

Sidewalk : corner Tremont St., petition a 568 
Statues— 

Leif Ericsson a 179 

Samuel Allans a 16, 216, 545 

John Winthrop a 15, c 239, a 338, 416 

Inscriptions on statues c 312, a 315, c 436, a 442 

Emancipation group a 353 

Flight from Pompeii, gift for new Latin school building a 568, 

c :,:• 601 

Steam engines, etc — 

Standing committee a 12 

173 High st , petition, order of notice a 13; hearing 59; permit 

1480 Tremont st., petition, order of notice a 77 ; healing 110 

permit 127 
824 Shawmut av., petition, order notice a 126; hearing 174 

permit 246 
Atlantic av, corner Oliver st., petition, order notice a 143 

hearing 189 ; permit 211 
558 Washington s;., petitiou, order notice a 143; hearing 189 

permit 211 
179 First St., petition, order notice a 156 ; hearing 209; permit 

216 
Metal furnaces at 290, 292 Washington st., petition a 174; per- 
mit 211 
877 Commercial st., petitiou, order notice a 175; hearing 213; 

permit '24ii 
137-13'.' Sumner st. (E.B.), petition a 258; hearing 314; permit 

335 
Albany, corner of Dedham st., petition, order notice a 327; 

hearing 36S ; permit 
Beacham st. mar Arlington av., petition, order notice a 319; 

hearing 4uu ; permit 402 
61-63 Blackstone st., petition, order notice a415; hearing 426 ; 

permit 447 
Beach st. rear 112, petition, order notice a 426; hearing 443; 

permit 447 
291 and 298 Commercial it., petition, order notice a 468 ; 

hearing 514; permit 519 
North Beacon st. (ward 23;, petition, order notice a 480; per- 
mit 534 

52 Fulton St., petition, order notice a 519; hearing, permit 551 

7 Way St., petition, order notice a 607; hearing 149; permit 665 
82 Sudbury st., petition a 629; permit 650 
150 D St., petition, order notice a 649; hearing 676; permit 688 
15 Wendell st., petitiou a 670; permit 700 
Stearns 8t Georgi — 

Eastern av. and A St., telegraph poles, permit a 29 

Western av. (Brighton), telegraph poles, petitiou a 59; permit 

a 94 ; revocation a 159 
Cougress-Bt. bridge, telegraph poles, petition a 349 
Stearns, Richard II. et al. — 

Tremont st. and Union park, modification of deeds, petition 
a 155,0 160; leave to withdraw a 211,c 220; modification 
of conditions of sale, petition a 230, c 232 
Stearns, Salome M. — 

Adams st., relocation between Ashmont and Minot sts., S99.75 
damages a 302 
Stearns, William T. et al. — 

Cambridge st. (ward 4), cdgestones, etc., abatements and re- 
asMsenients a 467 
Stebbins, George F. — 

Appointed public weigher a 426 
Stebbius, John, & Co. — 

South st. (ward 12) , stable, petition a 77; permit a 96 



Stebbins, S. B. et al.— 

Use of Faneuil Hall, petition a 425 ; permit 447 
Stetson, John — 

Essex st ., Globe Theatre, lamp-posts, permit a 416 
Stevens, Calvin — 

East Newton st., cancelling conditions upon laud of George II. 
Davis, petition a 155, c 160; leave to withdraw a 211, c 220 
Stevens, Caroline — 

Broadway, personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120; leave to with- 
draw a 352, c 354 
Stevens, Eliza J. — 

ith Grove ft., personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120 
.Stevens, Thomas M. — 

Spring st. (ward 23), stable a 13, 30 
Stevenson, J. Henry — 

Kennard av., sewer, $4.21 abatement a 212 
Stevenson, J. Henry, Nellie L. Fowle, et al. — 

Liverpool st. (E.B.), M.K.R. cars, petition a 425 
Stewart, F. E. — • 

Bedford st., at Chauncy St., permit to close a 198 
Stewart, James P. — 

Appointed weigher of coal a 109 
Stiles, John C. — 

Court and Howard sts., coaches, petition a 59; leave to with 
draw a 94 

Change of route of coaches, petitiou a 213 
StillingS, Samuel — 

82 Gray ^t., sidewalk, petition a 607 
Stone, L. 0.— 

Mather st. (ward 24), lamps, petition a 443 
Stone, Marshall S — 

Columbia St., relocation, S100 damages a 63 
Stone, Phineas A. et al. — 

^t., between Haymarket sq. and Hanover St., paving, 
petition a 443 
Stone, W. 1'. & Co.— 

179 First st., steam engine, petition, order notice a 156; hearing 
I j permit a 216 
Stony brook- 
Joint special committee c 4, 11, a 13 

Takn I 350,0 354 

Request for printed statement c 382, a 383. c 421 

Employment of laborers, central trades and labor union a 616 

Exchange of land on Parker st. a 365, c 870, a 417, c 419 

No. 39 Clay St., purchase of estate <• 532, a 533, 558, c 559 

Number of men and residents employed, order of inquiry a 546, 
c 548 ; report a 558, c 559 
Storey place — 

Paving : petition a 468 
Story, Joseph, & Asa Wilbur — 

Tax on estate, abatement, petition a 213, o 220; order passed 
880, c 635 
Stougbton street — 

Watering : petition a 230 

"Portion,"' order passed a 248 

Temporary closing: petition of Hoston water works a 258; 
permit a 281 

Tracks : order of notice a 317 ; hearing 349 ; permit 404 

Sidewalks : order passed a 458 
Stougbton street (Dorchester) — 

Sidewalk : petition a 443 
Stover, A. W. el al.— 

Petition to allow coasting on suitable street in Cuarleitown 
a 649 
Stowell, Aloozo II.— 

Appointed weigher of coal a 189 
Stowers. Edward T. — 

(In lsea-sf. bridge, superintendent, petition a 143 
Stoyle, Richard- 
Stable, petition a 43 ; permit a 65 
Street commissioners — 

0000 additional appropriation— see Appropriations 
: S. Barrel! elected commissioner a 665 
Streeter, Joseph H. et al. — 

Roxbury st. , sprinkling, petition a 213 
ee also alphabetic headings)— 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 1.3 

Standing committee of board of aldermen a 12 

Paving, standing committee of common council c 11 ; of board 
of aldermen a 12 

Superintendent authorized to remove structures on sidewalks, 
grant permits to open streets, number streets, purchase 
horses and supplies, furnish and set cdgestones, pave side- 
walks, erect tenees, la] crosswalks, and pave gutters a 29 

Committee authorized to refer claims to arbitration a 84 

rintendent to report statistics of New York, Philadelphia, 
and Baltimore a 15, c 16, a 26 

Superintendent's record, repealing or enforcing ordinance c 40, 
a 43 

Central Wharf and Wet Dork Corporation, permit a 65 

Annual report of superintendent a 95 

Extension of Newbury street a 111 , c 120, 239, a 243 
n entrance to Hack-Bay park — see Parks. 

Placing safes in buildings— sea Police. 

Regulation of si/.c of vehicles and their loads, c 173, a 175, 315, 
327, c 337, 356, a 365, c 382, 390, a 400 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LVII 



Superintendent directed to sprinkle certain streets a 199, 248 

Extension of Essex st. a 214, c 220, 239, a 243 

Widening of South st. a 214, c 220, 239, a 243 

Telephone to wharves and yards of paving department a 217 

Street nomenclature, c 256", 273, a 276, c 347, a 366, c 370, 382, 

390, a 400, 618, 682, c 692, a 700 
Boston Sugar Refinery Co., authorized to construct tunnel a 266 
Advertising wagons c 382, a 383 
East Chester park, extension c 398, a 400, c 461, a 465, c 490, 

a 499 
Awnings and shades a 401, c 405 
Relocation of Western av., notice to vacate a 402 
Bridges over Boston and Albany and Boston and Providence 

railroads a 403 
Advertising cars a 416 
Bridge on Beacon st. a 416 
Extension of Huntington av. a 443, c 455 
City solicitor authorized to accept deeds from Boston Water 

Power Company a 515, c 523 
Land purchased on Clay st. c 532, a 533 
Street crossings, removing snow, etc. c 20, a 26, c 40, a 43 
Brighton District, Central Mass. Telephone Co., petition a 59 
James J. Grace, sample of new pavement a 59, 212 
Charles W. Harris nominated and elected superintendent a 63, 

c87 
Schedules of cost of edgestones and sidewalks in sundry streets, 

etc., a 47, 85, 94, 336, 416, 430, 471, 516, 574, 650 
Belt railway lines — see Metropolitan Railroad 
Subterranean Cable Co., petition to lay wires under streets a 109 
Charlestown, Telephone Despatch Co., petition a 124 
Plan of land between Warren St., Blue Hill av., Seaver St., 

Walnut av., Townsend St.. petition a 174, c 181 
Letting out paving by contract : petition a 241 
Street leading from Maiden bridge to Everett line, petition to 

put in order a 456 
"Sundry streets of Roxbury and West Roxbury," telegraph 

poles, petition a 465 
Unnamed street near Beaver st., rear Beacon st. (ward 9), 

stable, petition a 499 ; permit 515 
Petition to allow coasting on suitable street in Charlestown 

a 649 
Width of vehicles, etc., petition indefinitely postponed a 691 
Passage-way leading to estate of John Droderick, pay for build- 
ing steps a 6SS 
Sprinkling: streets in Roxbury, A. B. Yetter & Co., petition 

a 43; Cook & Handy, petition a 174 
Streets in East Boston, D'Arcey & Atvvood, petition a 109 ; per- 
mit a 127 
Streets in Dorchester, Patrick Hart, petition a 109; permit 
a 127; Thomas White, jr., permit a 179; Daniel Clark 
petition a 209 ; permit a 217 
Streets in South Boston, Philip Sowdonjr., petition a 124 
Streets in city, Smith & Nevins, petition a 124; Malachi Clark, 
petition a 139 ; Adoniram Curtis, petition a 155 ; permit 
a 179; L. E. Moseley and A. J. Tuttle, executors, petition 
a 174 ; Orasmus Nute, petition a 174 ; John Gormley, peti- 
tion a 174; Albion J. Tuttle, executor, et al., petition a 174 
Streets in Brighton, Alexander McMurtey, petition a 155 ; per- 
mit a 179; Patrick Grace, petition a 189; Joseph Bennett 
et al., petition a 213 
Streets in Charlestown, William II. Quigley, petition a 189; 
P. J. Calnan, petition a 189 ; permit 212 ; Robert W. Gor- 
don, petition a 189 
Licenses to " sundry parties " a 198, 212 
Strong, Edward, et al. — 

Centre st. ( VV. R.), Speare lot, playground, petition a 297, c 307 
Studley, C. W., trustee — 

Corner City sq. and Charles-river av., telephone pole, remon- 
strance a 230 
Stultz, J. V. N.— 

Warren St., corner Dunreath pi. (ward 21) , stable, petition a 
499 ; permit 515 
Sturtevant, B. F. et al. — 

Union av., macadamizing, petition a 43 

Revere st. (ward 23) , edgestones, grading, etc., petition a 258 
Sturtevant, W. L. et al.— 

Meridian St., west side, sidewalk, petition a 468 
Subterranean Cable Co. — see Telephone wires 
Sudbury street — 

Steam-pipe; petition a 349; permit 367 
Melting furnaces : No. 82, petition a 629; permit 650 
Suffolk— see County of Suffolk 
Suffolk-st. district — see Lands 
Sullivan, Barry — ■ 

Appointed constable a 481 
Sullivau, Daniel P. — 

Appointed deputy sealer of weights and measures a 109 
Sullivan, Daniel P. et al. — 

Orchard park, guards around trees, petition a 189, c 200 
Orchard park, crosswalks, petition a 241 
Sullivan, Denis A. — 

Appointed constable a 456 
Sullivan, Kate — 

Personal injuries a 26, c 31 
Sullivan, Roger — 

Elected weigher and inspector of lighters a 197, c 225 



Sullivan, William P.— 

810 Bolton st. (South Boston), grade damages, petition a 413 
Sullivnn, William ,1. — 

310 Bolton st. (South Boston), grade damages, petition a 614, 
c 565, a 568 ; report referred a 614 
Sullivan square — 

Sprinkling: "portion," petition a 258; leave to withdraw 

a 388, c 390 
Passenger wagon : to Litchfield's wharf, petition a 365 ; leave 

to withdraw 387 
Omnibuses: extension of route from Salem St., petition a 456; 
referred to next board of aldermen 700 
Summer street — 

South Boston Railroad Co., transfer of cars from Chauncy st. 
to Summer and Lincoln sts. a 159, 179, 198 
Additional cars, order passed a 630 
Telegraph pole : corner Lincoln st. a 551 
Middlesex Railroad Co., additional cars, petition a 649 
Summer vacation — 

Common council 364, 382,396, 411, 423 
Board of aldermen 367 
Summit street (ward 23) — 
Lamps : petition a 499 
Sumner, Mary E. — 

Relocation of Adams st., between Ashmont and Minot sts., 
order to pay a 197 
Sumner street (ward 24) — 

Claims : personal injuries, petition a 109, c 120 

Personal injuries, petition c 421 
Macadamizing: from railroad to Cottage St., petition a 365 
Petition to put in order a 443 
Lamps : petition a 349 

Crossing : at Stoughton St., petition a 518; report 534 
Sumner street (E.B.) — 
Paving a 26 
Steam engine and boiler : Nos. 137-139, petition a 258 ; hearing 

314; permit 335 
Track to Maverick sq., petition a 276; order of notice 317; 

hearing 349 ; order passed 389 
Claims : personal injuries, petition c 32, a 43 ; report, further 

action inexpedient c 173, a 174 ; petition c 312 
Stable : near Jeffries St., petition a 400 ; permit 415 
Wooden building: No. 73-79, petition a 629, c 635, 694, a 700 
Switch-track : petition a 629 ; permit 650 
Grading: order passed a 630 
Sunderland street (ward 21) — 

Sewers : petition a 124 ; report, order notice a 144 ; hearing a 155 
Surveyor, city, department of— 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 13 

Thomas W. Davis nominated and elected city surveyor a 64, c87 
Annual report c 32 

Authorized to purchase supplies, etc. a 29, c 31, 54 
Survey and inspection of buildings — see Buildings 
Susmann, Herman — ■ 

42 Upton st., tree, petition a 258 
Swain, George F. — 

Blue Hill av., relocation, $29 damages a 500 
Swallow, Joseph, et al. — 

40 Faneuil Hall sq., occupying portion of street and passage- 
way, petition a 258 ; report a 281 
Swan, C. F. et al. — 

Increase of light in street lamps, petition a 59: report 665 
Swan, Robert — 

Hancock st., near Winter st., crosswalk, petition a 568 
Swan street (S.B.)— 

Claims : personal injuries, petition c 476, a 480 
Sweeney, Christopher F. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Sweeney, Daniel J. [senior], councilman (ward 2) — 
Presides as senior member elect 1, 2 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on joint rules and orders 3,512; rules 

and orders of common council 3; priuting 11 
Elected: finance committee 7; president pro tern. 418 
Remarks : 

Payment of amount retained on contract 99 
Member of board of health 131 
Improved sewerage 146 
Salaries of city officers 150 
Appropriation hill 183 
Excavating machinery 225 
Use of council chamber 322 
Decoration day 325 
Fourth of July 355 
Drinking-fotintaius 418 
Ambulance for East Boston 478 
Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 667 
Care of neglected children 693 
The closing proceedings 696 
Sweeney, Daniel J. [junior], councilman (ward 2)— 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on East Boston ferries 11 ; fuel 11 ; topics 
in mayor's inaugural address 12; celebration 250th anni- 
versary 49 
Remarks : 

Appropriation bill 184 



LVIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



250th anniversary 452 

Ambulance l'< > r Bast Boston 604 
Announcement relating to rumor of death 652 
Deci Ives and orders passed 687 

Sweeuej , John — 

Earl st. (ward 15). stable, petition a 349 ; permit 402 
Swcetscr, Frank K.. councilman (ward 3) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on treasury department 11 ; public parks 

11 ; cheap postage lti ; death of Joseph Kenney '204 
Eternal ks : 

.•street crossings 21 

Assessors' department 70 
Extension of Broadway 167 

nl assistant assessors 208 
City forester's greenhouse 233 

Stony brook 2^7 

Repairs on the council chamber 477 
Swett, .1. 11.— 

75 West Cottage st., edgestones, sidewalk, petitiou a 124; order 

passed 404 
Swett street- 
Portion of wharf let to J. E. Adams ,X: Co. a 94, c 99, 106 
Near Hilton st , lime-kiln a 97, 12S, 139 
Sprinkling: from Gerard st. to Ellery st. a 109 
Telegraph poles: petition a 663; per ui it, 691 
Swift, llenr\ \\ ., councilman (ward 9) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on claims 11; streets 11: funeral of 

councilman Perkins 034 
Remarks : 

Kiilis and orders of common council 7, 25, 38, 53 

Street and health departments 16 

Old State House 17 

Paj of laborers 22, 848, 363 

New court-house 22, 310 

Contested seat ill ward 16 36 

Assessors' department 68 

Commonwealth av. 73 

Thirteenth joint rule 74 

City hospital 103 

Salaries of city officers 149 

Second assistant assessors 154, 208 

Appropriation bill 183 

Bridge to Charlestown 205 

Public parks 228, 234, 491, 513, 524. 528, 538 

Ordinance in relation to finance 249 

South-end branch library 252 

Ston\ brook 272,286, 320 

Fourth of July 347, 355 

Law department 381, 391 

Extension of Broadway 382 

Truants and absentees from school 406 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 407 

Rewards tor detection and conviction of incendiaries 437 

250th anniversary 438, 451, 463 

Obstructions in Commercial St. 462 

Purchase of land on Clay st. 532 

Committee on legislative matters 563 

Right of member not voting to move reconsideration, 577 
l laborers for thanksgiving 584 

Death of councilman Perkins 633 

Revised ordinances 653 

Treatment of the poor 673 

The closing proceedings 696 
Swift, Henry \V. - 

Elected member of school committee a 665 
Swift, William II.— 

Appointed eot-stable a 481 
Sycamore street — 

Grading : petition a 383 
Byrnes, Agnes — 

Cornel Oak and Albany sts., personal injuries, petition c460; 

leave to withdraw c 537, a 543 

Tahb, E — 

Appointed public weigher a 213 
Tabcr street — 

Sidewalk : No. 16, petition a 586 
Taft, Edward A., manager, et al. — 

Harvard st., paving, petition a 3S3 
Taft, Robert— 

Remission of tax on school-house site, etc. c 312, a 314 
Tail's place (ward 23) — 

Stable: petition a 258 J permit a 281 
Tallon, Joseph D. — 

142 Ruggles st., sidewalk, petition a 425; order passed 447 
Tamworth street — 

Paving: from Boylston st. to Lagrange St., order passed a 404 

Pipe: petition a 425 ; permit 447 
Taunton Savings Hank — 

Extension of Weston St., $11,400 damages a 317 
Taxes — 

Assessors department : 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 12 

Report relating to election of assessors c 37, 54, 67, a 77 



Delegating power to appoint assistant assessors c 58, a 59 
Mode of electing assessors c 137, a 139; referred to next 

city council c 671, a 676 
Evasion of taxes a 266, c 268, a 277, 299, 353, c 354 
Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 
Assessors nominated c 92; elected a '.'3. C 99 
First assistant as- lOO, a 110; elected 

c 120, a 124, c 130, a 139, c 147, a 156, c 160, a 175, 
c 181 : resignation c 490, a 499 
Second assistant assessors nominated c 153; elected a 155, 
c 160, a 175, c 182, 202, 204,207, a 211, 214, c 222, a 230 
c 232, a 244 
Record of assessments for public improvements — see Legis- 
lative matters 

'fax levy — see Accounts, auditor's estimates 
School taxes, c 108, 122, a 125, c 137, 147, a 156 
Remission of tuxes: 

197 Miawmut av., Gabriel T. Boos a 112, c 120 
Middlesex st., Patrick Mahoney a 112. c 120, a 159, c 160 
East Third St., Adoniram Burrill a 112, c 120 
796 Alban; St., <• 123, a 125, 159, c 160 

88 Wheeler st., John B Regan a 127, c 130 
38 Porter st., John 15. Regan a 127, c 130 
Refunding taxes : 

Louis B. Sen ware, petition a 13, c 16; leave to withdraw 

a 665, c 670 
E. Pierson Beebe, leave to withdraw c 228, a 243 
Barnstable SavingsJBank, petition a 433 : leave to withdraw 

Thomas Wiggleswortb and Henry S. Grew, petition c 636, 
a 663 ; leave to withdraw c 071, a 676 

Abatcmt at at' taxes : 

Joseph Story, petition a 213, c 220: order passed a 630, 
o 886 

Taxes assvnn d: 

Robert Taft, Bailey st. c 312, a 314 

David N. Skillings, Newbury st. a 317, c 319, 340 

Mercantile Savings Institution, Seventh st. c 347, a 349 

Tax titles : responsibility for sales c 537, a 543 

Limitation of municipal expenditures a 680; indefinitely post- 
poned c 692 

Colin tor's department: 

Thomas slnrwin nominated and elected collector a 280, 
c 2112 

l'i\ of deceased employes c 048, a 649 
Quarterly reports, amendment of ordinance a 663, c 670 
Additional room assigned a 665 

Pal of deputies and clerks for night dutv c 675, a 677, 
cl 

Tavlor, 1). D.— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, C 161 

Tayloi B.— 

Berwick park, corner Columbus av., edgestones, petition a 383 ; 

order passed 404 
Berwick park, sidewalk, petition a 518 ; order passed 546 
Taylor, George W. et al. — 

Pembroke St. between Tremont st. and Columbus sq., sewer, 
petition a 349, i 
Taylor, John, councilman (ward 16) — 
(laths of office 1 

Elected: committee on accounts 10; clerk 15; director for 
public institutions c 31, a 44, c 65. a I 77, c 86, 

a 159, 175, c 187, 201, a 211, 214, o 222, 223, a 230 
Appointed : committee on department 11 

Tavlor, W. 0. etal.— 

Increase of light for street lamps, petition a 59; report 665 
Taylor, William, tl al. — 

Spring St., between Allen and Poplar sts., paving, petition 
a 425 ; order passed 447 
Taylor avenue — 

Crosswalk from Alexander av. a 189 
Taylor street (ward 24) — 

Stable : petition a 499 ; leave to withdraw 664 
Telegraph — sec Telephone wires 
Telegraph street — 

Sidewalks : No. 50, report, order passed a 179 
Petition a 209 
No. 17, petition a 518 
Telephone wires, etc. — see also streets by alphabetic heads — 

Regulation of c 136, a 139, 214, 243, 259, c 272, a 277, c 295, 
a 297, 318, c 334, a 353, 369, 431, 459; see Legislative 
matters 
Western av., near Walnut st., Brighton, change of location, 

petition a 230 
Corner City Sq. aud Charles-river a*., location of pole, remon- 
strance a 230 
J. N. George, fixture on engine-house, petition c 274 
Fire commissioners — see Fire Dcpt. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company, Centre and Quincy sts. a 543, 
689; Allston st. a 589 

American Bell Telephone Co. : 

Beacon, Brimmer, Arlington sts., Commonwealth av., etc. 
petition a 327 ; report, order notice 307 : bearing post- 
poned 400, 426; leave to withdraw 457 
Foundry st. (S.B.), between West Fourth st. and Dor- 
chester av., petition a 533; permit 589 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LIX 



West Roxbury District, petition a 551 ; permit 589 
Dover st. , Dover-st. bridge, West Fourth St., permit 589 
Call and Keyes sts. (ward 23), petition a 591 ; permit 631 
Green, Centre, South, Walkhill, Washington sts., Hyde 
Park av. ( ward 23), permit a 631 
Central .Mass. Telephone Co. : 

Brighton District, petition a 59 ; permit a 159 
Telephone Despatch Co. : 

Charlestown, petition a 124; permit 212 
Charles-river av., Water and Foss sts. (Charlestown), peti- 
tion a 276 ; permit 318 
Bngine-house, 4 Bulfmch St., permit c 295, a 297 
Parker, Centre, Lamartine, Boylston sts., and Boylston av., 

petition a 314 ; permit 389 
Charles-river av. and Chelsea St., removal ordered a 318 
Meridian st. (E.B.), permit a 335 
Certain streets in Dorchester, petition a 349 
Pearl and other streets, petition a 456 
Certain streets in Roxbury and West Roxbury, petition 

a 465 
South, Beach Albany, Dover, and other streets, permit 
a 535 
American Rapid Telegraph Co. : 

Beach, Albany, Hunnemau, and other streets, petition 

a 468 ; permit 534 
South, Lehigh, and Albany sts., permit to place wires on 
poles of Mutual Union Telegraph Co. a 534 
American Union Telegraph Co. : 

Dorchester av., Mechanics' National bank, permit a 47 
Gold aud Stock Telegraph Co. : 

Brighton av., attachment of wire to fire-alarm poles a 47, 

c49 
Warren bridge and old toll-house, fixtures, petition a 499 ; 

permit 514 
Chelsea bridge, petition a 663 
Mutual Union Telegraph Co. : 

Lincoln, Beach, South, and other streets a 514; permit 535 
Lincoln st. and Blue Hill av., order passed a 589 
Western Union Telegraph Co. : 
Columbus av., petition a 77 
Eliot st., near Pleasant st. and Columbus av., permit 

a 416 
Federal St., outside N. Y. and N. E. R. depot, petition, a 
443 ; report 471 ; order passed 618 
Subterrauean Cable Co.: petition to lav wires under streets 

a 109 
Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Co. : 

Albany and Kingston sts., petition a 209; permit a 217 
Temple, Charles E. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Temple place — 

Crosswalk : petition a 139 ; permit a 159 
Awning sign, No. 32, petition a 468; report 515, 630 
Temple street (Dorchester) — 

Petition to put in order a 43 
Temple street (W.R.)— 

Grading, gravelling a 43 
Tenean street (Neponset) — 

Plank walk : petition a 607 
Tenney, Philenia — 

26 Langdon St., edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 230; order a 248 
Teutler, Samson A. — 

218 West Seventh st., sidewalks, order passed a 388; petition 
a 425 ; order passed 447 
Terrace street — 

Crosswalks : petition a 109; permit a 127 
Lamp : petition a 109 ; permit a 144 

Edgestones, sidewalks, from Tremont st. to eud of Drury Block, 
petition a 258 
Thaxter, D. M. B.— 

L st. (S.B. ), petition for change in deed of land c 120, a 125; 
report aud order a 197, c 200 
Thaxter, Theodore, et al. — 

Bowdoin sq. (ward 24), lamps, petition a 518 
Thayer, William II.— 

39 Clay st., Roxbury, purchase of estate c 532, a 533, 558, 
c559 
Third street — 

Approval of houses, petition a 258, c 268 
Thomas, Chauncy — 

103 Chestnut st. (ward 9) stable, petition a 456; permit 467 
Thomas, Richard — 

Washington St., near Green St., damages, petition c 120, a 125 ; 
leave to withdraw c 295, a 297 
Thompson, Edward, trustee — 

Change av., sewer, assessment a 515 
Thompson, Robert — 

Personal injuries on great sewer in Dorchester, petition a 400, 
c 405 ; leave to withdraw a 690, c 692 
Thompson, Ruth II. — 

1278 Tremont St., stable, petition a 327; permit 402 
Parker St., sidewalks, petition a 613 
Thompson, William, heirs of — 

Change av., sewer, abatement a 515 
Thorndike, George Larkin, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 



Appointed : committee on improved sewerage 2; county arcounts 
12; sewers 12 ; assessors' department 12 ; City hospital 12; 
East Boston ferries 12; engineer's department. 12 ; ordi- 
nances 12; public buildings 12; public lands 12 ; public 
library 13; surveyor's department 13; water lo; Stony 
brook 13; new bridge to Charlestown 26; Faneuil Hall and 
county buildings 30 ; fourth of July 213 ; municipal elec- 
tion returns 663 
Elected : committee on accounts 2 
Remarks : 

Waste of water 61, 80 
Appropriation bill 192 
Pay of laborers 304 
Barrel wagons 328 
Thornley st. (ward 24) — 

Stable : corner Pleasant st., petition a 213, 586 ; permit 616 
Thornton street — 

Sidewalks : petition a 349 ; order passed 521 
Petition to allow coasting a 649 
Thurston, Charlotte M. et al. — 

Parker st. (Charlestown), sewer, petition a 297, order of notice 
317 ; remonstrance 327 ; hearing 327 ; order passed 415 
Tibbetts, A. J. et al.— 

Blue Hill av., between Dudley and Woodbine sts., sprinkling, 
petition a 213 
Tighe, John — 

Forest St., sewer, refunding amount paid, petition a 568, c 576 
Tilden, C-jr.— 

Blue Hill av., corner Central av. (ward 24), wooden building, 
permit a 350, c 354 
Tileston, Frank L. — 

Nominated and elected commissioner of Cedar Grove cemetery 
c 137, 147, a 156 
Tileston's wharf — 

Dredging, petition a 297 
Tilton, H. W. etal.— 

Milk st., from Oliver to Kilby St., crosswalk, petition a 297 
Tilton, John G. et al.— 

Longwood av., crosswalk at Bellevuo St., petition a 209 ; report 
a 217 
Tinkham, B. — 

Dover St., stable, petition a 327; permit 402 
Tinkham, Fannie A. — 

Kennard av., sewer, $30.52 assessment a 547; $26.02 assess- 
ment a 558 
Tinkham, George II., executor — 

Holden court, lamp, petition a 586 
Titus, Lyman — 

North avenue, sidewalk, remonstrance, leave to withdraw a 521 
Tobey, J. W.— 

327 Commonwealth ay., sidewalks, petition a 413; order passed 

447 
165 Commonwealthav., sidewalks, petition a 480; order passed 500 
Todd, E. S. et al.— 

Ferdinand St., from Chandler to Tremont sts., crosswalk, peti- 
tion a 400 
Toland, Hugh J.— 

Appointed sealer of weights and measures a 109 
Tolman, Elizabeth S. and Mary E. Sumner — 

Relocation of Adams St., between Ashmont and Minot sts., 
$126 damages a 197 
Tompson, E. \V. E. et al. — 

Ward St., between Parker st. and Bumstead lane, lamps, peti- 
tion a 468 
Torrey, Alice W. — 

Washington and Melville avenues, edgestones, petition a 443; 
order passed 458 
Torrey, Elbridge — 

Washington st., corner Melville av. (ward 24), stable, petition 
a 18'.*, permit a 212 
Torrey, Elbridge, et al. — 

Increase of light in street lamps, petition a 59; report 665 
Tower, A. J. — 

Albany St., corner Dedham St., steam engine, petition and order 

of notice a 327 ; hearing 365 ; permit 388 
Corner Albany and Dedham sts., sidewalk, petition a 518; order 

passed 574 
549 Albany St., driveway, petition a 568 
Towne, J. Warren, et al. — 

Bunker Hill St., crosswalk at Pearl St., petition a 174 
Townsend, N. S. and Susan D. Messenger — 

81 and 89 Walnut av., sidewalks, petition a 2C9 
Townsend street — 

Plan of land between Warren st., Blue Tlill av., Seaver St., 

Walnut av., Townsend St., petition a 174, c 181 
Stable: petition a 514; permit 534 
Tracey, Mary Ann — 

Prince St., personal injuries, petition a 139, c 146; leave to 
withdraw a 352, c 354 
Trask, Charles T. et al. — 

Washington st., between Ruggles and Eustis sts. (Roxbury), 
sewer, petition a 155 ; hearing 276 
Travers, Patrick — 

Appointed constable, a 109 ; boud approved a 126 
Treasury department — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 13 



LX 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Charles II. Dennle nominated and elected city and county treas- 
urer a 280, e 292 

Annual report e 271, a 277, 3S7, e 390 

nits ul l.ne treasurer and collector of Brighton a 124, c 130 
a 402, c -I');,, : , «6, c 41'.' 

Defalcation a 621, c 512, a 568, 586, 611, 614, c 621, 618, a 649 ; 
Sinking-funds 

Deficit in sinking-funds, notice of demand on city treasurer 
referred a 5*6. c ©U 

Pay of expert a 

Ordinance to amend ordinance in relation to finance referred 
a 615, C 621 ; report let'em I a 863, e 670 

Verification of payment of interest and bonds by auditor of 
accounts referred a 616, port referred e W6, a 049, 

Special drafts upon treasurer, order passed a G82, G 60S 
Bonds of treasurer, repol t a USS, c 692 
Trees — 

Dallas pi., removal, petition a 109 

7 Auburn st., removal, petition a 109 

Parsons st. (Brighton), removal, petition a 155; permit 175 

1502 Washington st., tree-box, petition a 174 

Orchard park, guards tor trees, petition 200 

Mt Pleasant aw, removal, petition a 206, 220 

Corner Tremont and Downer ets., removal, petition a 220; 

order passed ■ 
34 renin St., substitution, petition a 230; order passed 280 
73 Ceilar st., removal, petition 
122 Vernon st., temoval, petition a 230; order passi 
Gardner st. ward 25), planting, petition a 241, c 24',) 

llellevue St., lemoval. petition a 241, C 249 ; report and reference 

a 280 
25 Liverpool st. (E.B.), removal, petition a 241, c 249 
127 Vernon t., removal, petition a 258 
42 Upton st., removal, petition a 258 
Dearborn pi . removal, order passed 

41 Upton St., removal, petition 

bester av., opp. Victoria st., removal, petition a 425; 
report 534 
Passage-wa) from Concord to Rutland sts., removal, petition 

a 456; leave to withdraw 534 
1" ~t., between Fust and Second sts., removal, petition a 465; 

report 534 
Highland St., cor. Fortav., removal, petition a48o; report 558 
Bellevue St., removal, petition a 499 ; leave to withdraw 568 
King st. (ward 24; , petition a 518, c 523 
laii liell st., petition a 518, c I 
631 and 633 Main st. (Charlestown), removal, petition a 543; 

permit 
Dorchester av. near Victoria St., removal, petition a 551 ; report 
587 
Treniere, John 1!., heirs of — 

Commercial st., ;?214 damages a 127 
Tremont place (ward 24) — 

Lamps : petition a 533 
Tremont row- 
Claims : injuries c 120, a 125 
Tremont street — 

Lantern, fountain House a 26, 04 
tirade damages a 26, 217 

Steam engine and boiler, No. 14S0 a 77, 110, 127 
Claims: personal injuries c 137. a 139, 155, c 160, 295, a 297, 
502, a 686, e 801, a 676, i 

Modification of deeds a 156, e 160, a 211, c 220 

Modification of conditions of sale, petition a 230, c 232 

met Montgomery st., fence c 172, a 174; order 
referred e 256, a 268 
Lantern, No. 255 a 174, 197 
Sprinkling: from Brookline av. to easterly end of Heath st. 

bank a 199 

Banner sign, studio building a 209 

. 400 to 41S, petition a 213; order passed a 248 
Corner Station st., petition a 568 
Tree.- : corner Downer st., petition a 230; order passed a 280 
Paving: between Lagrange and f.iiot sts., order passed a 800 
Stable: No. 1278, petition a 327 ; permit 402 
Widening: damages n 352 

Passage-ways in rear of — see West Newton st. 

Drinking fountain : corner Shawmut av., petition a 413 

Grading : from Concord to Lenox st., order passed a 416 

Between B. & P. railroad and boundary between Boston 
and llrookline, order passed a 45s 
Edgestoni >8, petition a 499 ; order passed 521 

Lamp : No. 264, petition a 514 
Crossings, etc. : at Providence Railroad crossing, petitions a 551, 

Sewers : abatement and assessments a 98 
Hearing a 270; order passed 300 

Near Phillips st., petition a 327 ; order notice 402 ; hearing 
414 : order passed 415 
Tremont street (ward 25) — 

Stable a 30 
Tremont Temple, proprietors of — 

Lamps: petition a 514 ; permit 519 
Trenton street — 

Stable: No. 71, petition a 465 ; permit 472 



Trinity Church — 

Newbury and Clarendon sts., sidewalks, petition a 450; order 
passed 467 
Trinity Church el til. — 

Dartmouth and Boylston sts., triangular lot, petition to lay out 
as public square a 518, c 523 
Troy street — 

Sidewalk : petition a 209 ; order passed a 248 
Trull street (ward 24)— 

Putting in order for travel : petition a 241 

1-M otters: between llellevue and Harwich sts., order 

oil) 
Tubus, .). 0.— 

(oiner Union and Winship sts. (ward 25), stable, petition a 276 
Tuck, Mrs. I. A.— 

25 Liverpool st. (E.B.), removal of trees, petition a 241, c 249 
Tucker, dames C. — 

Nominated and elected superintendent of public buildines a 64, 

Mather st., edgestoneR, petition a 26; order passed a 212 
18 Mather st., sidewalks, petition a 480; order passed 500 

Tucker, Joseph Augustus, alderman — 

Oaths of. 

Appointed: committee on county accounts 12; lamps 12; 

paving 12; .-team engines 12: city registrar's department 

12: claims 12; fuel 12; legislative matters 12; Mt. Hope 
■ Cedar Grove eemeteries 12: public instruction 12; 

water 13; Franklin fund accounts 4S : care ot hvdrants 

211 ; fourth of dulv 2b! 
Elected: committer iintsa2; chairman a 15; trustee of 

City hospital a 29, c 31, a 230, e 232 
Remarks : 

Waste of water 01,82, 587 

Care of public grounds 64 

Superintendent ot public lands ;i:; 

Bridge to Charlestown 96 

City hospital 110 

win school-house 142 

I intendents of bridges 1 13 
Appropi iation bill 193 
l'.N of laborers 197, 

New court-bon I, 597, 008 

West Koxburv and South Boston parks 267 

Barrel wagons 315, ;J27, 410 

Centre st.. sewer 334, 474 

Inspector of vinegar 400 

250th anniversary 434, 472 

Rewards for detection and conviction of incendiaries 442 

Inspectors of elections 4 S 2 

Polling-place in ward 13 485 

Evening high school 515, 519 

Removal of engine No, 12 

Plank walk on Longwood av. 545 

Telegraph and telephone wires 555 

Increase Of police force 556 

St. Elizabeth's hospital site 618 

Constitutional amendment abolishing tax qualification of 

vote. 
Transfer of powers to overseers of poor 677 
Reorganisation ot school committee 681 
Tucker, Lewis R., councilman (ward 14) — 
Oaths of office 1 

Elected : committee on accounts 10 
Appointed: committee on public instruction 11 ; celebration of 

250tb anniversary 220 
Remarks: 

Extension of Broadway 108 
Public parks 608 
Tuckerman, George N.— 

Appointed constable a 83 
Tuckerman, George W. it al. — 

nils approved a 94 
Tudor street — 

Macadamising, etc. : between E and F sts., petition a 77 ; order 

passed 317 

Sidewalks, roadway: from C to D st., petition a 139; order 

d 317 
Grading : between K and K sts., order passed a 458 
Tufts, Edwin— 

Brmatorv deed of land c 18, a 26, 97, c 106 
Tufts, .lames \\'.— 

39 Bowker st., alteration of sidewalk, petition a 77 
Tufts, x. & A.— 

Beach St, near Medford (ward 4), stable, petition a 297; permit 
335; license rescinded 352 
Tufts street— 

< ; : » s 1 i tr 1 1 1 : petition a 383 
Turner, Alfred T.— 

Clerk of finance committee e 18 

linated .and elected auditor of accounts a 280, c 292 
Turner. Charles K. ft al. — 

■ -t., plank walk, etc., petition a 59 
Tuttle, Albion J. (executor), i-t al. — 

inkling city streets, petition a 174 
Tuttle, Joel W.— 

Sidewalks : order passed a 367 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LXI 



Tuttle, Samuel L.— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 

Tuttle, Thomas W — 

Sumner st. (ward 24), petition to put in order a 443 

Tuxbury, George W. — 

lioston St., edgestones, petition a 499; order passed 521 

Twelfth Baptist Society- 
Phillips st., sewer, assessment a 98 

Tyler, William G.— 

Appointed constable a 456 

Tyner, William — 

East Fifth st., sidewalk, petition a 109 ; order passed 317 

Undertakers — 

Albert M. Harden a 109 
Alexis Alexander, et al. a 174 
John Feeny a 189 
Thomas Feely a 389 
John Heintz a 189 
John A. Finn a 297 
William P. Costello a 827 
Michael E. Donahoe a 413 
Timothy F. Manning a 456 
Michael Barry a 481 
I'rederick S. Pinkhani a 533 
John Morris a 543 
Underwood, Mrs. W. E. et al. — ■ 

East Newton st., paving, etc., petition a 480 
Unfinished business — 

Standing committees directed to resume c 4, a 13, 15 
Referred to next city government: 

West Newton-st. school-house a 515, c 523 

Additional inspectors of buildings c 585, a 586 

Ambulance for East Boston c 604, a 613 

D St. extension c 646, a 649 

Revision of the ordinances c 659, a 663 

Blossom-st. primary school, purchase of land a 664, o 670 

Prince school, purchase of land a 664, o 670 

East Boston high school a 666, c 670 

Salary of superintendents of Chelsea and Maiden bridge 

c 670, a 674 
$SOO,000 loan for West Roxbury park c 670, a 676 
New plan for electing assistant assessors c 671, a 676 
New ferry landing a 688, c 692 
Location of steam fire engine No. 12 c 692, a 700 
Unfinished business iu hands of joint standing committees 

c 695, a 700 
Bridge to Charlestown c 692, a 700 
Referred to next board of aldermen : 
Remodelling old court-house a 613 
Hathorne's omnibus line a 700 
Filling vacancies in board of aldermen a 701 
Unfinished business in hands of standing committees a 701 
Union avenue — 

Macadamizing a 43 
Petition to put in order a 59 
Union avenue (ward 23) — 

Wooden buildings : movement to Washington St., petition a 443; 

permit 458 
Pay for land taken, petition a 450 ; leave to withdraw 515 
Union Freight Railroad Company — 

Tracks on Commercial st. petition a 26, 124; permit a 535 
Union Railway — 

Inquiry on running extra cars a 47 
Union park — 

Modification of deeds a 155, c 160, a 211, c 220 
Modification of conditions of sale a 230, c 232 
Declaration respecting deeds a 306 
Union square (ward 25) — 

Stable : petition a 533 ; permit 547 
Union street (ward 25) — 

Stable: corner Winship st., petition a 276 
Union street (W.R.)— 

_ Grading, edgestones, gutters, macadamizing, order passed a 336 
Union Wharf Corporation — 

Commercial st., widening, $21,900 damages a 111, 197 
Upham, J. H. et al. — 

Boston st., macadamizing, petition a 43 
Upham, J. H. & Co. et al. — 

Dudley and Stoughton sts., sprinkling, petition a 230 
Upham, James H. — 

765-767 Dudley st., sidewalk, petition a 209; order passed a 248 
12 and 14 Hancock St., sidewalks, petition a 413 ; order passed 447 
Upham's corner — 

Crosswalk : to corner Upham's av. and Hancock St., petition a 568 
Upton street — 

Surface drain : petition a 109 

Trees: No. 42, petition a 258 

No. 41, petition a 327 

Vale street — 

Edgestones : at 24, 26 and 28, petition a 425 ; order passed 447 
Nos. 16 and 18 petition a 465; order passed 500 

Edgestone, sidewalk : at 46, petition a 465 
Valpey, Ezra II. — 

New F'aneuil Hall market, transfer of stall 3, a 458 



Van Nostrand, W. T. et al., wards 3, 4, and 5 — 

Foui - -foot burners on street lamps, petition a 155 
Van Nostrand, W. T. el al. — 

Alford St., from Maiden bridge to Everett line, paving, petitiou 

a 189 
Veale, Bridget — 

Corner Tremont and Park sts., personal injuries, petition a 586, 

c601 
Vernon street — 

Claims : personal injuries, c 57, a 59 

Movement of wooden building to, petition a 124 ; permit a 145 
Trees : No. 122, petition a 23u ; order passed 280 ; No. 127, peti- 
tion a 258 
Victoria street — 

Crossing: at Dorchester av.. petition a 465; report 471 
Viles, Alden E.. councilman (ward 8) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on overseers of poor 11; salaries 11; 

cheap postage 16 
Remarks : — 

Fourth of July music 347 
Viles, Clinton, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on joint rules and orders 2, 543; markets 

12 ; sewers 12 ; city registrar's department 12 ; Fast Boston 

ferries 12; health 12 ; police 12; printing 12; survey and 

inspection of buildings 13; water 13; Stony brook 13; 

streets (board of aldermen) 12; streets (joint) 13; revision 

of charter 44; Franklin fund accounts 48 ; auditor's esti- 
mates 125; funeral of alderman Bell 231 ; Fourth of July 

243; municipal election returns 650 
Elected : director for public institutions a 29, c 31 
Remarks : 

Care of public grounds 26, 64 

City hospital 110 

Board of health 114 

Swett-st. lime-kiln 139 

South Boston railroad stable 159, 174 

Appropriation bill 195 

Pay of laborers 197,304 

Ferry tolls 198 

Death of alderman Bell 231 

Printing ancient records 244 

Drainage of Muddy river 266 

Barrel wagons 329, 447 

Centre-st. sewer 333, 473 

Stony brook 352 

Burrill claim 368 

Inspector of vinegar 401 

Stony-brook nuisance 403 

250th anniversary 433, 445, 471, 480 

Inspectors of election 482 

Evening high school 520 

Increase of police force 543, 556 

Stony-brook laborers 546 

St. Elizabeth's hospital site 575, 618 

New court-house 599, 608, 612, 613 

Free soup 614 

Transfer of powers to overseers of poor 676, 701 

Reorganization of school committee 681 

Location of engine No 12 687 

Care of neglected children 688 
Vinegar — 

Inspector appointed a 241 
Compensation of inspector — see Salaries 
Petition for modification of act — see Legislative matters 
Vinton street — 

Stable : No. 4, petition a 139 
Virginia avenue — 

Stable: petition a 365; permit 3S8 

Petition a 443; permit 574 

(Rear) petition a 649; permit 664 
Vogel, Leopold — 

Boylston St., sidewalk, petition a 518 

Wade, James H. — 

Reimbursement for expenses in 1874, petition c 120, a 125 
Wade, W. Foster- 
Appointed weigher and inspector of bundle hay and straw a 43 
Wadleigh, J. C— 

Rear of Market st., near Western ay., wooden building, petition 
a 465, c 475 ; permit a 471 
Wadsworth, Alexander F. — 

George st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 139; order passed 
a 159 
Wadsworth, A. F. et al. — ■ 

George St., between Magazine and Shirley sts., petition to put 
iu order a 213 
Walbridge, Frederick Griswold, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on state aid 2; bridges 12 ; City hospital 
12; fire department 12; police 12; public instruction 12; 
treasury department 13; treatment of poor 13; new bridge 
to Charlestown 26; new court-house 15; funeral of alder-s 
man Bell 231; fourth of July 243; state election return 
545; municipal election returns 650 



LXII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Elected : trustee of Mt. [lope cemetery n 44, e 55 

Remarks : 

Superintendent of public lands 93 
Swett-t. lime-kiln 139 
South Boston railroad 179 
Pay of laborers 198 
Polling place In ward 13 486 
Walcott, Elbridge— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Walden street (ward 22)— 

Movement of wooden building a 109, 127 

Sewer: petition a 543 
Waldoek, .lames, et al. — 

Tremont >t., at railroad crossing, crosswalk, petition a 568 
Wales, 8. Walter— 

Geneva av. (ward 24), wooden building, petition a 543, c 518 

Geneva av., stable, petition a 543 ; permil 
Wales, William Q. et til.— 

Olnev st., from tieneva av. to Bowdoin St., plank walk, petition 
a 4i", 
Wales street — 

Petition to put in order a 59 
Walker, Gideon — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Walker, Henry — 

Chosen chairman of board of poliec commissioners a 259 
Walker, .lames M.— 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper a 214, c 222 
Walker, John II. et ill. — 

Burroughs St. (Jamaica Plain), poles, remonstrance a 533 
Walker, Samuel, & Co. — 

33 India St., petroleum, etc., renewal of license a 197 
Walker, William f . it al.— 

Brighton av., sidewalk, petition a 93; order passed 483 
Walkhill str. et — 

From Hack st. to Blue Hill av., petition to put in order a 43 

Poles : between South st. and Hyde Park av., permit a 031 
Wallace, Richard, et al. — 

Commercial St. (ward 24), between Dorchester av. and Pleasant 
st., sprinkling, petition a 213 
Wallburg, C, S A. A. Sherry— 

52 and 54 Dale st., sidewalk, petition a 533 
Waliis, Elbridge O.— 

Appointed constable a 450 
Walnut avenue — 

Sewer: petition a 174; hearing 276 

Plan of land between Warren St., Blue Hill av., Seaver st., 
Walnut, av., Townscud St.. petition a 171, c 181 

Sidewalks : Nos. 89 and SI, paving, remonstrances a 209 
From Rockland to Hainbridge St., order passed a 281 

Sprinkling: between Warren st. and Kgleston sq., petition 

" Portion." order passed a 248 
Lamps : near Elniore st., petition a 327 
Crosswalk, at Hainbridge st., petition a 383 
Walnut street — 

Sidewalk : petition a 230; order passed a 248 

Edgestones: near Xeponset av., petition a 413; order passed 

447 ; petition 5S6 
Telephone poles : between N'eponset av. and Ericsson St., permit 
a 5S'J 
Walsh, James U.— 

Petition for release as surety from bond of, a 13, 47 
Walsh, John S. . I al.— 

Williams st., from Shawmut av. to Westminster St., sidewalks, 
petition a 413 
Walsh, Matthew, councilman (ward 8) — 
Qualified 340 

Appointed committee on new bridge to Charlcstown 348; en- 
gineer's department 348 
Remarks : 

Pay of laborers for thanksgiving 584 
Walsh, Morris J.— 

Appointed constable a 481 
Walsh, William— 

Plympton St. (ward 17), stable, petition a 189; permit a 212 
Waltham street — 

Sidewalks, gutters, etc. a 139 

No. 78, petition of St. Elizabeth's hospital, for release of condi- 
tion on estate a 314 
Walton street (ward 22) — 

Stable : petition a 109 ; permit a 128 
Ward, F. J.— 

Ward St., sewer, abatement a 4i 
Ward, Isaac N. — 

West Boston bridge, personal injuries a 93, c 98 
Ward, John P. J., councilman (ward 7) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on elections 4; legislative matters 11 ; 

death of Joseph Keuuey 204 
Remarks : — 

Contested seat in ward 16 33 

City hospital 105 

Investigation of death of Joseph Kenney 172, 202 

Fourth of July celebration 223 

South-end branch library 253 



Trustees of City hospital '_'74 
I -e of council chamber 323 
Decoration day 321 

Visit of committee on fire department to other cities 325 
Charles river embankment 320 
Barrel wagons 356 

Truants and absentees from school 406 
Committee on legislative matters 563, 579 
Proposed abolition of election precincts c 566, 581 
Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 667 
Ward street — 

Sewer, abatements a 47, 446 

Assessment a 47. 

Grade damages : at No. 8, a 416 

Ward street (ward 22) — 

Stable: petition a 59; permit a 84 

Grade damages : No. 80. petition a 327 ; leave to withdraw 691 
No. 34, order passed a 471 
Corner llallock st., order passed a 471 
Lamps: between Parker st. and Rumstead lane, petition a 468 

Ward street, (ward 23) — 

Grade damages : No. 20, petition a 31 1 

Wards- 
Ward 20, ward-room a 458,0 400, a 531, C 
Free use of ward-rooms, order referred a lli'\ c 418 
I se of ward-room, ward 3, petition a 0»>3, c670j permit c 695, 
a 700 

Wardwell, Henry, trustee — 

Blue Hill av., relocation, $8.40 damages a 520 

Ware, Frank T — 

Appointed constable a 481 

Ware street — 

Edgestones i petition a 297 

Petition s 199 ; orders passed 516 
Ware street (ward 24) 

Putting in order for travel : petition a 241 
Edgestones: order passed a 317 

im street — 

Claims: Edward F. Meaney, Improved sewerage damages, peti 
tion a 189, c 200; report referred a 315 
Waring, John T. — 

Sudbury st., steam pipe, petition a 349; permit 367 
Warren, Alnnzo — 

Tudor st., macadamizing, etc., petitiou a 77; order passed 317 
Warren, George — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Warren, George W. — 

Elected first assistant assessor c 121, a 124 
Warren, J. I'., and Win. M. — 

Patent method of laying pavement, petition a 26 
Warren, Rebecca W. — 

37 Renfrew st., sidewalk, petition a 189 ; order passed a 212 
Warren, Timothy — 

Whitney st.. stable, petition a 425 
Warren, William, heirs of — 

Washington St., relocation at Brighton, $289 damages a 28 
Warren, W. F. et al. — 

Rockland st., ward 25, petition a 43 
Warren, W. II. — 

Constable, petition for release of surety on bond a 349, 030 
Warren, W. II — 

70 Baxter st., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 499 
Warren avenue (Charlcstown ) — 

Telegraph poles : petition a 349; permit 367 
Warren avenue — 

FAi So. 23, petition a 533 ; order passed 558 

Warren street — 

Relocation near lllue Hill av., damages a 28, 175, 212 

Telegraph posts a 69, 85 

Stai :iou a 109; permit a I 

Corner Dunrcath pi., petition a 199; permit 515 

Edgestones : near Blue Hill av., petition a 174 

Sidewalks: Dear Gaston St., petition a 174 
No. 028, petition a 51S; order passed 546 
Plan of land between Warren St., Blue Hill av., Seaver St., 
Walnut av., Townsend st., petition a 174, c 181 

Sprinkling: between Dudley st. and drove hall, petition a 209 
" Portion," order passed a 248 

Metropolitan U.K. tracks a 247 

Edgestones, gutters, from Wabon st. to Blue Hill av., order 

passed a 281 
Edgestones, gutters, sidewalks: northerly side of Warren and 
Washington sts., between Blue Hill av. and Columbia st., 
order passed a 317 
Claims: personal injuries, petition a 93, c 99; leave to with- 
draw a 388, c 390 
No. 7, hoisting beam a 93, 112 

Crossings : from Copeland to Rockland St., petition a 533 
Warwick street — 

Stable : petition a 305 ; leave to withdraw 429 
Edges tone, sidewalk : at 28, petition a 443; order passed 458 
Washburn, Miles — 

340 Beacon St. stable, petition a 613 ; permit 649 
Washington avenue — 

Edgestone : petition a 443 ; order passed 458 
Washington's birthday — see Boston celebrations 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LXIII 



Washington street (Haymarket sq. to Dedham line) — 
Widening : damages a 94, 197 

Claims: near Green St., loss of horse and damages to vehicle 
c 120, a 125, c 295, a 297 

Near Bennet st., personal injuries, c 32, a 43 

At 453, personal injuries a 213. c 220 

Hemenway estate, personal injuries a 613, o 621 
Gravelling : from Walkhill st. to Dedham line a 26 
Sewers : between Ruggles and Eustis sts., petition a 155 ; hear- 
ing 276 ; order passed a 282 

Nos. 407 and 409, appeal from assessment a 124, 144 
Stables: between Harrison av., Essex and Beach sts., petition 

a 139; leave to withdraw 402 
Hoisting beam : at No 2132 a 139 
Steam-engine : at No. 558 a 143, 189, 211 
Sidewalks : corner State st., grade a 155, 388 

Between Dudley and Bartlett sts., order passed a 447 
Tree-box : at No. 1502 a 174 
Metal furnaces : at Nos. 290, 292 a 174, 211 
Edgestones, sidewalks : Nos. 2356-2362 a 179 
Box and sign : near Leland pi. a 189 
Crosswalks : between Hanover and Elm sts. a 189 

Corner Poplar St., petition a 543 
Macadamizing: between Egleston sq. and Walkhill st. a 77 
Passenger wagons : near Morton St. to Mt. Hope and Calvary 

cemeteries a 109, 176 
Lanterns : No. 699, petitiou a 213 ; permit 246 

No. 655, petition a 425 ; report 472 
Watering : between Cliff and Cedar sts., petition a 230 
Widening and macadamizing : between Forest Hills and South 

St., petition a 241 
Paving: between Dudley and Bartlett sts., petition a 241 
Trees: preservation on estate of John II. Hunnemau, petition 

a 241 
Sprinkling : " portion," order passed a 248 
Sidewalk : No. 2999, order passed a 248 
Rocks: near Beach st. (W.R.), permit to remove a 248 
Coaches : Highland R. Co., from Forest Hills station to Mt. 

Hope, petition a 276 ; permit 299 
Edgestones : petition a 327 ; order passed 350 
Wooden buildings : movement from Union av., petition a 443; 

permit 458 
Lamp-post : at 440, petition a 443; permit 458 
Turnout: Metropolitan R.li. Co., corner Northampton St., 

order notice a 458; hearing 480; permit 516 
Grading : between Green st. and Union av. ( W.R.), order passed 

a 458 
Lamp and post : at 736 and 738, petition a 465 ; permit 483 
Plank walk : from Albion to Beech St., petition a 480 
Telegraph poles : a 534, 631 
Land damages : Nos. 2085-87, petition a 543 
Transparency : No. 768, petition a 543 
South Boston R.R. Co., additional cars, order passed a 630 
Middlesex R.R. Co., additional cars, petition a 649 
Washington street (continuation of Warren St. to Milton line) — 
Metropolitan R.R. double track a 13, 93, 159, 209, 247 ; remon- 
strance a 213 ; order passed a 247 
Plank walk : from Grove hall to N.Y. & N.E. R.R. bridge, a 43 
Cross-walk : at Lotus pi. a 139, 209 

Wooden buildings : near Euclid St., erection a 124, c 130, 173, 
a 175 

Movement to Parkman st. a 124 ; permit a 248 

Movement to Capen St., petition a 209 ; leave to withdraw 
a 248 
Stables : near Norfolk St. a 124 

Corner Melville av. a 189, 212 
Grade : between School and Green sts. ( W.R.), order to estab- 
lish passed a 217 
Edgestones : estates of Nancy G. Parker and Mary P. Wales, 

remonstrances a 241 
Edgestones, gutters, sidewalks : northerly side to Columbia st., 

order passed a 317 
Telephone poles : between Adams st. and Milton line, permit a 589 
Washington street (from Commercial st. to the water, ward 24) — 
Wooden building : movement to Gibson st. a 109, 159 
Lighting : between Albano aud Beach sts. a 139 
Projection of lantern from 699, a 213 
Sewer : from School to Howard sts., petition a 276 
Stable: near Richmond St., petition a 327; permit 350 
Mount Bowdoin, temporary closing of bridge, permit a 471 
Pole : near Dorchester av., petitiou a 514; permit 521 
Washington street (from Brookline line to Newton line, ward 25) — 
Relocation : between Cambridge and Market sts., damages a 28, 

46, 84, 97 
Sprinkling : " portion," order passed a 248 
Stable : near Allston St., petition a 568 ; report 590 
Water — 

Joint standing committee c 11, a 13 

Wm. F. Davis, nominated and elected water registrar a 64, c 87 ; 

bond approved a 554 
Topics in mayor's address referred c 39, a 44 
Albert Stanwood appointed member of water board a 209, c 222 
Temporary occupation of Albany st. and closing of Stoughton 

St., petition a 258 ; permit a 281 
Use of standpipe at Milton, petition c 346 : report and reference 

c 379, a 383 



Town of Framingham : notice of application to legislature a 514, 

c 523 ; report referred with instructions a 629, c 635 
Lower Mystic pond nuisance, petition c 548, a 554 : report 

referred to water board c 624, a 629 
Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Co., purchase of franchise, petition 

c 565, a 568 
High service : request of water board referred a 589; report, 
order passed to petitiou for authority to take land a 629, 
c 635 
Additional storage basin : request of water board referred c 602, 
a 613 ; report referred c 624, a 629; report, order passed 
c 646, a 649 
Town of Medford: petition to legislature for regulation of 

deposits in Mystic pond a 663, c 670 
Contracling for supply pipes and castings a 28, 47, c 49, 71 
Waste of water c 49, a 60, 77, c 490, a 499, c 583, a 587, c 602, 

a 613 
$280,000 for pipes for new main a 63, c 66, a 84, c 86, 123, 130, 

a 143, c 146, 309, a 314, c 346, a 349, 366, c 370, 396 
Additional appropriation — see Appropriations 
Release.of land for Mystic-valley seweral76, c 181, a245, c 249 
Sudburv-river basins, removal of loam — request to water 

board a 176, c 181, a 210 
Sudbury-river basins, loam, etc., request to city engineer a 176, 

c 181, a 210 
Care of hydrants— see Fire department 
Acceptance of act authorizing new mains c 172, a 175, 211 
High service for East Boston a 245, c 249, 272 
Monument on Old Fort lot, Roxbury, c 316, a 349 
Watering-trough in East Boston a 366, e 370 
New main to Mystic pumping-station c 396, a 400 
Ordinance relating to laying of water-pipes c 396, a 400 
Drinking-foun tains c 373, a 38 ,} , 413, c 418 
Pay of a deceased employe c 455, a 457, c 475 
Annua) report a 468 

Supply to aqueduct corporation c 490, a 499, c 520, a 533 
Supply for Cambridge c 503, a 514 

Sudbury-river basins, condition of water a 520, c 523; inquiry 
respecting constructiou a 520, c 523; report a 554 
Water street (Charlestown) — 
Telephone poles a 276, 318 

Wooden addition to No. 62, petition c 565, a 568 
Wooden building: No. 63, petition a 629, c 633 
Waterman, Samuel C. et al. — 

Downer St. (Roxbury), sewer, petition a 241 ; hearing 276 
Watkins, George F. — 

Appointed public weigher a 189 
Watson, Edward — ■ 

7 Auburn st. (Roxbury), removal of tree, petition a 109 
Way, John M.— 

Columbia st., relocation, $295 damages a 46 
Blue Hill av., relocation, $56 damages a 46 
Way street — 

Steam engine : No. 7, petition, order notice a 607 ; hearing 649; 
permit 665 
Wayne street — ■ 

Grading : petition a 13 

Grading, gravelling, from Blue Hill av. to Maple St., order 
passed a 281 
Webb & Watson— 

17 Border st. (ward 2), wooden building, petition a 365, c 370 
Weber, George, et al — 

Canterbury st., petition a 43 
Webster street (ward 2) — 

Boston Sugar Kefinery, leave to lay pipes a 241 
Wooden building : movement from 22l to 227, petitiou a 443 
Movement from 227 to Marginal St., petition a 468 
Weighers (public) — 

Appointments a 109, 125, 139, 189, 209, 213, 241, 297, 314, 400, 
426, 514, 586, 6ti3, 676 
Weights and measures — 

Annual report, sealer of a 26 
Sealer and deputies appointed a 109, 365 
Weilhart, i. M. et al.— 

Spring lane (ward 23), lamps, petitiou a 533 
Welby, L. D. et al.— 

Medical attendance for worthy poor, petition a 456, c 460 
Welby, Lawrence D. — 

Petition relating to reports of committees a 575 ; indefinitely- 
postponed c 576 
Welch, Charles A.— 

Broadway extension, $6300 damages a 429 
Welch, William J., councilman (ward 7) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on city registrar's department 11 ; police 

11 
Remarks : 

Increase of police force 560 
Weld, John — 

Blakemore st., laying out, $321.20 damages a 402 
Weld, Samuel, et al. — 

Sunderland st. (ward 21), sewer, petition a 124 
Devon st., between Blue Hill av. aud Warren St., sewer, petitiou 
a 425 ; order passed 446 
Weld, Samuel W., heirs of— 

Warren St., relocation, $1020.63 damages a 175 



IAIV 



[NDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Welles, Jane — 

and Washington sts., grade of sidewalk, petition a 155 ; 
oiilcr passed 388 
Wellington, P. A.— 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
Wellington, Henry \V. — 

Be Iford St., widening, $4845 damages a . 
Wellington street — 

tones, sidewalk : No. 2, petition a 543; order passed 558 
Wells, Frank L.— 

Appointed third assistant city messenger a 1S9, c 200 
Wells street— 

Steam pipe, petition a 425 
Wendell, Walter T — 

Moridian-st. bridge, supt., petition a 143, ballots c 149, a 166, 
c 160 
Wendell street— 

Melting-furnaces : No. 15, petition a 076; permit 700 
Went, until X Tiatton— 

327 Shawmut av., lantern aud druggist's mortar, petition a 174 ; 
permit a 197 
Wentworth, O. M.— 

182 Commonwealth ;iv., sidewalk, petition a 241 
Wentworth, 0. M. <t al. — 

Park on Back Hay, name, petition a 425, c 430 
1 rob, Charles — 

German St. (want 23), stable, petitions 59; permit a 84 
West, W. II. et al.— 

Neponset av., petition a 43 
Welter, John D. it al.— 

Greenwood av. (ward 23), sewer, petition a 563 
Weston, Nathan, it al. — 

Dorchester av., at King-st., crossing, petition a 518; report 684 
King st., shade-trees, petition a 518, e 523 
West Broadwaj (ward 13) — 

Wooden building: No. 2S7, extension, petition a 297, c 307; 
permit a 350, c 354 
West Camden street — 

Lot of land : forfeiture a 366, c 370, 398, a 400 

1 Ian too street — 
Sewer: west of Columbus av., petition B 

1 : personal injuries, petition e 694, a 700 
West Cedar street (ward 9) — 

Stable: No. 68, petition a 314; report 547 
West Chester park- 
Telegraph pole a 15 

Metropolitan R. Co., tracks a 124 

Sprinkling : from B. & 1'. H. bridge to Deacon st, a 199 

Bridge rep lire a 403 

Wooden building: movement to Rogers av., near I!ay View 
place (ward 22), petition a 543; permit 558 
We- street- 

Grading : petition a 241 

Widening: damages, petition for bearing a 230 ; order passed 
a 4,0 

-tones, -ilewalks: No. 90, petition a 349 J order passed 367 
It No, 75, petition a 124 ; order passed 404 

intersection of Cottage and Dudley sts. a 480; 
report 500 
West Eighth street — 

Claims : injuries to horse, petition a 568, c 576 
West [fifth street — 

Grade damages : No. 97 ; petition a 543 
West first street — 

Wooden building: No. 370, removal to cornerof F St., petition 
a 211 ; perm i 1 
West Fourth street— 

Kdgestoncs, gutters, sidewalks : between I" and Dorchester sts., 

order passed a 317 
Wooden building : near Old Colony railroad, petition a 327, 

c 337 ; permit a 850, c 354 
Stable: at 134, petition a 443; leave to withdraw 701 
Telephone po.es : permit a 689 
Westminster street — 

N,i-. 74-T'J, injuries by surface water, leave to withdraw c 312, 
a 314 
West Newton street — 

Request for school-house on city land, referred a 109, c 120; 

report referred to next city council, a §15, e 623 
Passage-way : to West Springl ii I of Tremont st., peti- 

tion to put in order a 866, e 370; report referred a 407 
West Ninth street — 

Sidewalks : abatement a 124, 145 
Edgestone and sidewalk abatement a 213 
Edgestones : No. 167, petition a 568 
West Second street— 

■ralk : No. 3S0, petition a465; order passed 500 
West Seventh street — 

Movement of wooden building from near B st. to 2S West 

Seventh st., petition a 174 
Sidewalks : at 115, petition a 174; order passed 198 
At 218, order p 

At 179, petition a 413; order passed 447 
At 177, petition a 499 

es, sidewalks: at 218, petition a 425; order passed 447 
Petition to put in order between Dorchester and F sts., a 45G 



West Sixth street— 

Edgestones, sidewalks: Nos. 121-123, petition a 189 

Noa. 117-119, petition a 241 

Nos. 115-117, petition a 276; order passed 317 

No. 125, petition a 868; order passed 281 

No. 127, petition a 25S; order passed 281 

No. 139, petition a 413; order passed 117 
Edgestones, gotten, sidewalks: between C and F sts., order 

passed a :;17 
Edgestones, sidewalks, crossings: petition a 97; order passed 

212 
Paving: between C and 1) sts., order passed a 404 
West Springfield street — 

Claims: personal injuries c 120, a 125 
West. Third street- 
Sidewalks : at 307-9, petition a 425; order passed 417 
Edgestones, sidewalks : at 821, petition a 450; order passed 407 
Westei a) — 

Telegraph poles a 59, 94, 159, 230, 091 

Grading, from Cambridge line to North Harvard St., also 

macadamizing, order passed a 300 
Injury to well : petition a 408 ■ leave to withdraw 500 
Relocation : damages a 3s8, 088 

Notice to vacate a 402 
Widening: damages a 411 
Woolen building: movement to North Harvard St., permit 

a no 

Land damages : petition a 43 
petition a 568 

Construction, macadamizing, etc., petition c 32, a 43 

Western Union Telegraph Co. — see Telephone wires 
Weston street — 

Extension : damages a 317 

Grading: from Cabot to Warwick sts., petition a 425; order 
passi I 

Stable : No. 19, petition a 450; permit 472 
Weymouth Iron Co. et al. — 

Dorchester a v., Adams St., Neponset av., telegraph poles, peti- 
tion a 888 
Wharton, William P., councilman (ward 11) — 

Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on elections J ; ordinances 11 ; judiciary 
11 ; public instruction 12 

Remarks: 

Contested teat in ward 16 34 

AsseBSOl B' dcpai tment 70 
City hospital 104 
New court-bouse 108 

iilicaiion of the ordinances 154, 887, 043, 655 
Excavating machinery 225 
Stony brook 290 
Barrel wagons 356 

haw department 393 

Truants and absentees from school 420 
Treatment of tin: poor 673 

of neglected children 693 
Wheatland, George, jr. — 

Jlarli I sts., edgestones, sidewalk, petition 

a 209; order a 218 
Wheatland, Q. W., jr.— 

Marlborough st., edgestone", petition a 413: order passed Hi 

Marlb "' Hereford st., sidewalks, petition a 480; 

order passed 500 
Wheeler, Charles, councilman (ward 10) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed : committee on fuel 11 ; ordinances 11; Stony brook 

11 ; judiciary 11 

Remarks : 

Rules and orders of common council 6 
Contested seat in ward 10 30 
Arnold arboretum 
Topics in mayor's ad Iress t 1 ) 
New court-house 41, 108, 292, 310 
| 55 
department 08 

Extension ol Broadway 86, 108, 1G8 

I . hospital 90, 101 

Me. .ii,-.- oi board of health 132 

Second assistant assessors 154 

Bridge to Charlestown 181, 205 

Appropriation bill 187 

Death of councilman Joseph Ilealy 218 

ii-end blanch llbiai . 

Evasion of taxes 269 

Street nomenclature 273 

Trustees of City hospital 274 

ony brook 288 

mittee on parks 295 
Inscriptions on statues 312 
Barrel wagons 338, 
Fourth of Jul] 
Fire alarms 419 

\ ieit to Mj Stic water works 424 
Public parks 491 , 524, 530, 539 
Young elm on the eoinim 
Increase of police force 536 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LXV 



Committee on legislative matters 549, 563 
Abolition of voting precincts 581 
Extension of Highland park 601 
Revised ordinances 604, 626, 640, 653 
School committee 693 
Wheeler, Emerson, et al. — 

Corner of Cambridge and North Harvard sts. (ward 25), cross- 
walks, petition a 59; report 483 
Wheeler street — 

No. 33, land and building forfeited and bond cancelled a 97, 98, 
c 106, a 127, o 130; sale authorized a 143 
Wheelock, A. P.— 

Hancock St. (ward 24), stable, petition a 456; permit 467 
Wheelock, Maria — 

Gaston St., sewer, $34.42 abatement a 558 
Wheelock, Peter S., Judge of Roxbury Municipal Court — 

Bill for examination of insane persons, petition a 349; leave to 
withdraw 429 
Wheelock, Sidney, agent, et al. — 

Ohio St., paving, petition a 213 
Wheelwright, George W, Jr. el al. — 

Glen road, east from Forest Hills st. sewer, petition a^443 ; order 
for hearing 458 ; hearing 465 ; order passed 472 
Wheyland, Michael — 

Appointed field-driver and pound-keeper for West Roxbury 
a 335, c 337 
Whidden, Thomas J. et al. — 

Upton St., surface drain, petition a 109 
Whitaker, Lewis, et al. — 

Norfolk av., watering, petition a 276 
Whitcomb, Edgar — 

Deceased, order to pay $48 due a 212, c 220, 232 
Whitcomb, E. Noyes — ■ 

Maple st., near Schuyler st. (ward 21), stable, petition a 258 ; 
permit a 281 
Whitcomb, George H. — 

Appointed public weigher a 125 
White, Henry B. et al. — 

Battery march St., between Milk and Broad sts., paving, peti- 
tion a 400 
White, James C. et al. — 

Park av., cost of sprinkling, petition a 189 
White, James T. — 

Tremont St., widening, $77.50 damages a 352 
White, John, et al. — 

Western av., relocation between North Harvard st. and Charles 
river, notice to vacate a 402 
White, John, et ux. — 

Hyde st. (Dorchester), damages for death of son, petition a 456, 
c 460; leave to withdraw a 546, c 548 
White, Thomas, Jr. — 

Sprinkling streets in Dorchester, permit a 179 
White avenue (West Roxbury) — 

Sewer: between Woodman and Centre sts., order notice a 467; 
hearing 468 
Whiteside, John II. — 

Appointed constable a 481 
Whiting, Albert T.— 

Nominated and elected director of public institutions a 175, 
c 187, 201, a 211, 214, c 222 
Whitmore, C. J. et al., trustees — 

Hancock st., plank walks, etc., petition a 349 
Whitmore, W. H.— 

Drinking fountain junction Shawmut av. and Tremont st., peti- 
tion a 413 
Harwich st., sewer, petition and order of notice a 435; hearing 
443; order passed 458 
Whitmore, William H., councilman (ward 12) — 
Oaths of office 1 
Appointed: committee on ordinances 11 ; judiciary 11; record 

commissioner a 125, c 131 
Remarks : 

School expenditures 5 

Rules and orders of common council 6, 23, 38, 53 

Joint rules and orders 9, 18, 542 

Amendments to rules of common council 12 

Licensing of minors 16 

Street and health departments 16 

Old State-house 16 

Powers of school committee 20, 31 

Lamb's map of Boston 21 

Fire in Federal and Devonshire sts. 21 

New court-house 22, 42, 107, 292, 309, 622 

Contested seat in ward 16 3 1 

Topics in mayor's address 39 

Contract system 40 

City hospital 50, 101, 584, 605 

Harbor defences 50 

Washington's birthday 57 

Assessors' department 58, 69 

Public library 66 

Recess during elections 67 

Thirteenth joint rule 74 

First assistant assessors 121, 147 

Member of board of health 135 

Superintendent of public lands 136 



City engineer 136 

Improved sewerage 146 

Salaries of city officers 149 

Badges 152 

Second assistant assessors 153, 160, 202, 204, 207 

City officers opposing legislation 154, 206 

Sale of public lands 166 

Extension of Broadway, 168 

Investigation of death of Joseph Kenney 171 

Bridge to Charlestown 181 

Appropriation bill 182 

Discontinuance of public land department 187 

Death of councilman Joseph Healy 218 

Excavating machinery 224 

Printing four volumes of ancient records 226, 250 

250th anniversary 228, 239, 436, 438, 450, 462, 463, 475, 477 

Square at Meeting-house hill 229, 249, 295 

Death of alderman Bell 232 

Free concerts 234 

Public parks 234, 491, 504, 523, 525, 527, 538 

Owners of West Roxbury park 238 

Ordinance in relation to finance 249 

South-end branch library 253, 273 

Street nomenclature 256, 273 

Removing fences enclosing public grounds 268 

Evasion of taxes 269 

Trustees of City hospital 273 

Printing registration laws 274 

Stony brook 290, 313, 319, 354, 382 

Committee on parks 295 

Decoration day 296 

Special counsel 312 

Use of council chamber 322 

Fourth of July 324, 347, 355 

Barrel wagons 337, 356, 390 

Examination of manufacturing establishments 354, 396,398, 
407 

Assessments on real estate 363 

New main from Chestnut-hill reservoir 372 

Codification of ordinances 379, 397, 604, 626, 638, 653 

Law department 381, 391, 419 

Truants and absentees from school 405, 411, 420, 476 

Reducing motions to writing 411, 421 

Free use of ward-rooms 418 

Visit to Mystic water works 423 

Rewards for detection and conviction of incendiaries 436 

Increase of police force 461, 536, 560, 625, 652 

Police station on Back bay 461 

Obstructions in Commercial street 462 

Discharging of vessels in the stream 475 

Pay of disabled laborers 476 

Repairs on the council chamber 476 

Back-bay improvements 502 

Telegraph and telephone wires 537, 559 

Tax titles 537 

Urinal in Maverick sq. 548 

Committee on legislative matters 549, 561, 578, 624 

Inspection of vinegar 565, 578 

Repeal of charter provision for general meetings of legal 
voters 565, 576 

Management of police department 566, 576 

Right of member not voting to move reconsideration 577 

Extension of Highland park 601 

Horse railroads and public parks 602 

Soup for the poor 621 

Verification by auditor of payment of interest and bonds 
648, 652 

Vote by mayor in board of aldermen 652 

Death of councilman Daniel J. Sweeney, jr. 667 

Change in building laws 670 

Election of assistant assessors 671 

Treatment of the poor 673 

Power to locate departments 673, 695 

Repeal of ordinance relating to contracts 674 

Limitation of municipal expenditures 692 

Location of steam fire-engine No. 12 692 

School committee 693 

Care of neglected children 693 

Removal of house offal from East Boston 695 
Whitney, William S.— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161, a 175 
Whitney street — 

Claims : personal injuries a 43, c 49 
Stable : petition a 425 
Whittemore, Eben W. — 

Appointed fence-viewer a 214, c 222 
Whitten, Charles Varney, alderman — 
Oaths of office 1 

Elected : committee on accounts 2 
Appointed : committee on Faneuil Hall and county buildings 12 

(resigned 30); claims 12; Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove 

cemeteries 12 ; ordinances 12 ; public library 13; treasury 

department 13; public parks 13; treatment of poor 13; 

topics in major's address 14; inspection of prisons 15; 

cheap postage 13; celebration of 250th anniversary 44; har- 
bor defences 44; auditor's estimates 125; death of Joseph 



LXVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Keniipy 211 ; fourth of July 213 ; reducing number of con- 
stables 415 
Remarks : 

Appropriation bill 196 

Pay of laborers 197, 306 

Defalcation in treasurer's office 521, 586, 614 

Constitutional amendment abolishing tax qualification of 

voter 
Increase of police force 566 
New court-house, 698, 608 
Free soup till 

Extra pay for clerks and deputy collectors 677 
Whitten, Isaiah— 

Elected second assistant assessor a 155, c 161 
Whitten, John — 

10 Blossom St., lamps, petition a 485 
Whittier, Charles A — 

Newbury st. (ward 11), stable, petition a 327; permit 350 
Whitwell, 8. 11.— 

Corner lleacon and Hereford sts., sidewalks, petition a 276; 
order passed 317 
Whitwell, K. A. et ill.— 

Fairfield st., between Newbury and Tioylston sts., edgestones, 
gutters, grading, etc., petition a 413 
Wiggin, ('buries E. — 

West Cottage st., grading, petition a 241 
Wiggin, John W.— 

Appointed measurer of wood and bark a 125 
Wigglesworth, Thomas and Henry s. Grew, executors — 

Repayment of taxes, petition c 636, a 663; leave toj withdraw 
c071, a 676 
Wightman, Henry M. — 

Nominated and elected city engineer a 144, c 147 
"Wightman, Joseph M. — 

Appointed registrar of voters a 109 
Wilbur, N. S.— 

City hospital land, removal of temporary wooden building, pcti- 
' tion c 686, a (363; report, referred to trustees City hospital 
c 670, a 676 
Wild, G. W.— 

North Beacon st., near Cambridge st. (ward 25), wooden addi- 
tion to building, petition C 601 
Wild, Henry M. el al.— 

Cambridge st. (Brighton), petition for flagging crossing a 13; 

report 4 S 3 
Harvard av. (ward 25), lamp, petition a 124 
Wilder, Marshall P. et ill.— 

Washington st. (Dorchester), petition against track a 93 
Columbia st. (Dorchester), permission to occupy sidewalk 
a 145 
Wildes, Solomon, heirs of, et al. — 

Washington St., crosswalk between Hanover and Elm sts. 
petition a 189 
Willard place (ward 25)— 

Stable: petition a 568 j report 590 
Willcutt, b. L., et al. of ward 23— 

Mt. Hellevue, improvement of summit, petition c 32, a 43 
Baker, Centre, Grove sts. (ward 23), lamps, petition a 456 
Williams, Andrew- 
Claim : Lawrence si hool-house, defective drainage, leave to with- 
draw a 280, c 283 
Williams, Arthur K.— 

Appointed weigher of coal and measurer of wood and bark a 83 
Williams, A. 1). it al.— 

Corner Dudley St. and Mt. Pleasant av., location of* engine com - 
> No. 12, petition a 543, c 548 
Williams, A." O.— 

1'arnham st., near Gerard st. (ward 20), wooden building, peti- 
tion a 613, c 621 
Williams, Charles II , councilman (ward 11)— 
Oaths of office 1 

Appointed : committee on health 11 ; water 11 ; claims 648 
Remarks : 

Street crossings 21 

City hospital 103 

Member ot board of health 135 

Intramural interments L">4 

Bridge to Charlestown 205 

Second assistant assessors 207 

Excavating machinery 225 

Evasion ol taxes 271 

Stony brook 286, 313, 320 

Barrel wagons 339, 356 

New main from Chestnut Hill reservoir 372 

250th anniversary 4-j4, 403 

Hack Hay improvements 502 

Public parks 508 

Increase of police force 561 

Visitors to City hospital on Sundays 584 

Waste of water 604 

Death of councilman Perkins 633 

Revised ordinances 650 
Williams, Edward II. — 

Centre and Pond sts., sewer, abatement a 144 
Williams, Edward II., trustee — 

Centre and Pond sts., sewer, assessment a 144 



Williams, E, II. it al., trustees — 

art off Centre st., petition a 314 ; permit a 350 
Williams, Edward II., and John I). Bryant, trustees— 

Pond and Centre sts., sewer, abatement, petition a 174; appeal 
to jury a 276 
Williams, Gilbert — 

Petition for street lamps a 13 
Williams, Henry 15. — 

St. James av., sewer, petition a 414; order for hearing 415; 

hearing 426; order passed 440 
Noe. 62-72 St. James av., sidewalks, petition a 568 
Williams, J. I), & M. et al.— 

Central st. between custom house and Atlantic av., paving, 
petition a :v>7 
Williams, John J., archbishop of Boston — 

St. Augustine church, boundary line adjusted a 666, c 670 
Williams, John J. — 

Fifth st.. damages, petition c 460; report referred a 515, 521, 
c 523, a 67 I 
Williams, Martha A. et al. — 

Worcester sip, edgestones, petition a 568 
Williams, Wright W.— 

1 1 ted constable a 481 
Williams court — 

Paving: petition a 43; order passed 574 
Williams street (ward 5) — 

Wooden building: rear of 20, extension, petition a 297, c 307 
pel mil a 850, c 354 
Williams street- 
Stable : petition a 109 ; permit a 128 

lewalks: from Shawmut av. to Westminster St., petition 
a 413 
Williams street (ward 24) — 

Stable: petition a 533; pcnui' 
Willis. Sarah E.— 

Washington St., relocation at Brighton, $139.50 damages a 28 
Willis, Sophia E.— 

Belle vue av. (ward 23), stable, petition a 327 ; permit a 350 
Willow court — 

Petition that it be lighted a 568 
Wiluiont street — 

wer: petition a 109; report and order of notice 144; hearing 
155 ; order passed 300 
Edgestom lies: petition a 425 ; order passed a 447 

Edgestones : petition a 468; order passed 500 
Lamps : petition a 468 
Wilson, Andrew P. — 

Warren bridge, personal injuries, petition a 276, c 283, a S27, 
e 337 ; leave to withdraw a 429, c 436; petition a 551, c 559; 
leave to withdraw a 650. c 652 
Wilson, C. H.— 

238 Commonwealth av., sidewalk, petition a 456: order passed 
407 
Wilson, George L. — 

Appointed constable a 456 

Wilson, George W. et al. — 

Appointment of Patrick Norton superintendent of common, 
petition in favor a 94 
Wilson, John B. — 

62 Water st. (ward 5), wooden addition, petition c 565, a 568 
Wilson, Thomas E. et al. — 

Opening into Orchard park from Adams St. a 77, c 86, a 212, 
c 220 
Wilson, William — 

Putnam st., sidewalk, petition a 327; order passed 367 
Winchester, Artemas — 

West Koxbury, house offal, contract c 228, a 243 
Windsor street— 

Plank walk : petition a 568 
Winnisimmet Company — 

Release a 64, c 67 
Winship, K. Lyman — 

Gardner st. (ward 25), planting of tree, petition a 241, c 249 
Winship street (ward 25) — 

Crosswalks : petition a 59 ; report 483 

Stable: corner Union st., petition a 276 

Grade damages : petition a •'5 , '>.">; leave to withdraw 574 
Winslow, Rear-admiral John A. — 

Portrait a 95, 145, c 146, 16C, a 177, c 181, 201 
Winter, Julia M.— 

Gardner and Lincoln sts. (Brighton), edgestones, petition a297; 
order passed 317 
Winter street — 

Crosswalk : opposite No. 21, petition a 400 

Claims : personal injuries, petition a 663, c 670 
Winthrop, John — see Statues 
Winthrop square (Chai lestnwn) — 

Enclosure, petition c 206; leave to withdraw a 265, c 268 
Wise, Edward, agent — 

Centre st., between I.amartine St. and Wise pi., sewer, petition 
a 276; order of notice 317; hearing 327 ; order passed 402 
Witherbee, John li. — 

Burroughs st., sewer, abatement a 47 
Withers!!, George W. — 

Woodbine st., near Warren st. (ward 21), stable, petition a 613; 
permit 630 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



LXVII 



Witherell, Melinda G.— 


Worcester, Ira R. — 


Warren St., personal injuries, petition a 93, c99; leave to 


13 Ottawa st. (ward 22), stable, petition a 414 ; permit 483 


withdraw a 388, c 390 


Worcester square — 


Wogan, John T. & Co.— 


Edgestones : petition a 568 


Corner Eliot st. and Columbus av., use of bill-board, petition 


Worcester street— 


c 57, a 59 ; leave to withdraw a 85, c 86 


Standpipe: near junction with Columbus av., petition a 209 


Wolf, Peter, jr.— 


Wordsworth street- 


Mechanic st., edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 93 


Stable : petition a 443 ; permit 458 


Wolffsohn, Siegfried — 


Worthington, Roland — 


Appointed constable a 83, 481 ; bond approved a 230, 245 


Day st. ( Roxbury) , damages, petition a 327, c 337 


Wolston, John R. — 


Worthington, Roland, jr. — 


Appointed fence-viewer a 214, c 222 


Day st. (Roxbury), damages, petition a 327, c 337 


Wood, H. A. et al.— 


Worthington, It. et al. — 


Burch st. (W.R.), gradiQg, petition a 26 


Thornton and Oakland sts., sidewalks, petition a349 


Wood and bark — 


Congress sq. and Storey pi., repaving, petition a 468 


Measurers appointed a 83, 125, 139, 209, 297, 400 


Wright, H. A. et al.— 


Woodbine street — 


Elmore St., macadamizing, petition a 241 


Sidewalks: petition a 124; order passed a 281 


Wright, R. S. et al.— 


Lamps : No. 52, petition a 139 


Sycamore St., grading, petition a 383 


Stables : petition a 443 ; permit 483 


Wright, Warren A. — 


Near Warren st. (ward 21), petition a 613; permit 630 


Appointed constable a 456 


Woodman, J. G. et al. — 


Wyeth, Andrew N., jr. — 


Blue Hill av., at Schuyler St., crosswalks, report a 248 


Appointed: weigher and inspector of bundle hay a 83; public 


Woodman street — 


weigher a 139 


Sewer : abatement a 112 


Wyman, Abraham G. — 


Petition a 586 ; leave to withdraw 664 


Appointed constable a 456 


Lamps: petition a 456 


Wyman, Asa — 


Woodward, John A. — 


Columbia and New Seaver sts. (Dorchester), sidewalks, petition 


Defalcation in city treasury a 521, c 542, a 568 


a 276 ; order passed 317 


Woods, John E. et al.— 


Wyman, George H. et al. — 


Western av., land taken, petition a 43 ; $2500 damages 388 


Warren St., near Gaston St., sidewalks, petition a 174 


Woods, S. A. et al.— 


Wyman, George H., councilman (ward 21)-— 


Fuller st., plank walk, petition a 189 


Oaths of office 1 


Woolley, William, alderman — 


Appointed: committee on assessors' department 11 ; common 11 


Presides as senior member elect 1 


Elected : trustee of City hospital a 29, c 31 


Oaths of office 1 


Remarks : 


Appointed: committee on bridges 12; steam engines 12; engi- 


Assessors' department 6 


neer's department 12; fire department 12; harbor 12; 


Second assistant assessors 207 


public institutions 12; salaries 13; streets (joint) 13; 


Free concerts 233 


streets (board of aldermen) 12 ; pay of laborers 26 ; cele- 


250th anniversary 463 


bration June 17th 139, 248 ; death of Joseph Kenney 211 ; 


Wyman, I. C. — 


250th anniversary 243 ; fourth of July 243 ; state election 


28 Warwick St., edgestone, sidewalk, petition a 443; order 


returns 545 ; regulation telegraph and telephone wires 556 ; 


passed 458 


municipal election returns 650 


Wyman street (ward 22) — 


Remarks : 


Stable : permit a 159 


Drawing of jurors 64 


Wyoming street (Roxbury) — 


Fire marshal 94 


Lamps : petition a 518 


Notices of committee meetings 110 




Excavating machinery 243 


Yard master's mutual benefit association — 


Telegraph and telephone lines 259, 353, 430, 459 


Invitation accepted a 230, 245, c 249 


New court-house 262, 298 


Yetter, A. B. & Co.— 


Eaton square 298 


Sprinkling streets, petition a 43 


Pay of laborers 305 


Young. George W. — 


Barrel wagons 328 


Appointed weigher of coal a 499 


Personal explanation 466 




250th anniversary 471 


Zeigler, A. — 


Inspectors of election 482 


Corner Station and Tremont sts., sidewalk, petition a 568 


Polling-place in ward 13 486 


Zeigler, W.— 


Constables 534 


14 Alleghany St., edgestones, sidewalk, petition a 518; order 


Stony-brook laborers 546 


passed 546 


Public clock in Dorchester 557 


Zeigler street — 


Free soup 614 


Claims : injuries to horse, a 400, c 405 


Location of engine No. 12 687 


Telegraph poles a 534, 676 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Organization of the Government, 

JANUARY 5, 1880. 



The members elect of the Board of Aldermen 
were called to order at 10.15 A. M. by Alderman 
Woolley, senior member elect. 

A message was received from the Common 
Council that a quorum of that body were present 
and were ready to be qualified. Immediately the 
Board of Aldermen, accompanied by Chief Jus- 
tice Gray of the Supreme Judicial Court and the 
Chaplain, Rev. Charles F. Lee, proceeded to the 
Council Chamber. 

The members elect of the Common Council 
assembled in the Council Chamber and were call- 
ed to order at 10 A. M., by Mr. D. J. Sweeney, Sr., 
of Ward 2, the senior member. 

On motion of Mr. Plimpton of Ward 21, a com- 
mittee to collect credentials was appointed by the 
Chair, viz., Messrs. Plimpton of Ward 21, Howard 
of Ward 4, Coe of Ward 23, Hart of Ward 18, and 
Kendricken of Ward 20. The committee per- 
formed tbe duty assigned to them and reported 
that sixty members elect were present. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley of Ward 5, that gentle- 
man was appointed a committee to inform the 
Board of Aldermen that a quorum of the Council 
elect are present ready to be qualified. Mr. Sib- 
ley retired, and presently reported that he had 
performed the duty assigned, and that the mem- 
bers elect of the Board of Aldermen would soon 
be present for the purpose of qualification. 

Hon. Horace Gray, chief justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court, Rev. Charles F. Lee of Charles- 
town, the members elect of the Board of Alder- 
men and the City Clerk entered the council cham- 
ber and took seats with the members elect of the 
Council. 

William Woolley, senior member elect of the 
Board of Alderman took the chair. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. Charles F. Lee of 
Charlestown. 

The Chief Justice gave notice that as the Mayor 
was unable to be present, the oaths of office would 
have to be taken by the members of both branches 
elect and subscribed in the presence of the Chief 
Justice. 

The usual oaths of office were administered to 
the members elect of the Board of Aldermen, as 
follows: 

William Woolley, Clinton Viles, Hugh O'Brien, 
Lucius Slade, Charles Henry Bass Breck, James 
Joseoh Flynn, Joseph Augustus Tucker, George 
Edwin Bell, Asa Harden Caton, Frederick Gris- 
wold Walbridge, George Larkin Thorndike, 
Charles Varney Whitten. 

The Chief Justice administered the usual oaths 
of office to the members elect of the Common 
Council present, as follows: 

Ward 1— -Harvey N. Shepard, Martin M. Han- 
cock, Clarence P. Lovell. 

Ward 2 — Daniel J. Sweeney (Webster street), 
Cornelius F. Doherty, Daniel J. Sweeney (Porter 
street). 

Ward 3— Benjamin Brintnall, Frank E. Sweet- 
ser, Hiram I Nason. 

Ward 4— William H. Howard, Otis B. Dudley, 
Andrew J. Bailey. 

Ward 5— Francis W. Pray, Edwin Sibley, John 
P. Hilton. 

Ward 6— John A. Kidney, Andrew A . O'Dowd, 
Philip J. McLaughlin. 

Ward 7— John Doherty, John P. J. Ward, Will- 
iam J. Welch. 

Ward 8— James Christal, John B. Fitzpatrick, 
Alden E. Viles. 

Ward 9 — Malcolm S. Greenough, Henry W. 
Swift. 

Ward 10— Charles Wheeler, Joseph Healy, James 
G. Freeman. 

Ward 11— Charles F. Austin, William F. Whar- 
ton, Charles H. Williams. 

Ward 12 — William H. Whitmore, Patrick H. 
Cronin. 

Ward 13— Thomas H. Devlin, Martin T. Folan, 
John I Lane. 

Ward 14— Howard Clapp, Albert F. Lauten, 
Lewis R. Ttucker. 

Ward 15— Charles W. Donahoe, Frank F. Far- 
well, Henry E. Hosley. 

Ward 16— John Taylor, John E. Bowker, David 
F. Barry. 



Ward 17— George T. Perkins, John W. Morrison, 
Dudley R. Child. 

Ward 18— Nathan Sawyer, Thomas F. Hart, Na- 
thaniel Brimbecom. 

Ward 19— Benjamin F. Anthony, P. James Ma- 
guire, Jeremiah J. McNamara. 

Ward 20— Paul H. Kendricken, James Devine, 
Timothy A. Murphy. 

Ward 21— Charles E. Pratt, George H. Wyman, 
Charles H. Plimpton. 

Ward 22— Abraham T. Rogers. 

Ward 23— Henry F. Coe, Alfred S. Brown, John 
E. Blakemore. 

Ward 24— Henry N.Sawyer, George A.Fisher, 
Horace B. Clapp. 

Ward 25— George W. Hollis, Austin Bigelow. 

The absentees were Messrs. Henry Parkinan of 
Ward 9 and Thomas J. Denney of Ward 12. 

The Chief Justice announced that the Mayor 
had taken the usual oaths of office privately this 
morning. 

The oaths were signed by the members of the 
Board of Aldermen. 

The convention then dissolved. 

Board of Aldermen. 

Upon returning to the Aldermen's room, Al- 
derman Woolley took the chair, and on motion 
of Alderman Viles the Board proceeded to the 
election of a Chairman, with the following re- 
sult: 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary for a choice 6 

Hugh O'Brien had 11 

Alderman O'Brien was declared elected. 

Alderman Viles was appointed a committee to 
conduct the Chairman to the President's desk. 

Upon taking the chair the Chairman delivered 
the following address: 

Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen — I thank 
you for this mark of your favor. To be selected 
as your Chairman is an honor that I fully appre- 
ciate, and I shall endeavor to perform the duties 
faithfully and impartially. We commence the 
new year under very favorable circumstances. 
After a long period of depression, a new life has 
been imparted to all branches of industry, and 
there is now a promise of many years of business 
prosperity. Your fellow citizens have confided to 
you important trusts, and I feel assurred that you 
have accepted these trusts with a determination 
to give your whole time if necessary to the faith- 
ful performance of the work. The most impor- 
tant work of the year will have to be attended to 
during the first four months. The appropriations 
for the different departments have to be fixed be- 
fore the 1st of May. It is needless for me to say 
to you that all appropriations should be carefully 
scrutinized and considered and no money expend- 
ed that is not demanded by public necessity. Our 
city holds a high position among the cities of 
the country for good government, but it 
would be well also to remember the fact 
that our Municipal Government costs far more 
than any city government in the country, com- 
parative population considered. If in any de- 
partment there is waste, if in any department the 
expenses have been run up beyond a reasonable 
limit, do not hesitate to object to such expendi- 
tures. A prompt attention to this matter, I have 
no doubt, will accomplish good results. 

I might repeat what I said last year, because the 
experience of the year just passed has proved 
the truth of the remarks— "Do not fritter away 
your time on a reduction of salaries." This yoii 
will find a most unprofitable work, and the 
amount saved would at most be comparatively 
small. Strike at the large appropriations; cut 
them down to reasonable figures, and you will find 
that this is the most practical way of reducing 
the bills of our taxpayers. 

Notwithstanding we are now in the full realiza- 
tion of a more prosperous state of business, we 
must not forget that real estate has to bear the 
burden of taxation, and that real estate has not 
yet fully recovered from the depression of the 
past six years. During these years we have had 
to submit to a fearful shrinkage. The valuation 
of the city in 1874 was $798,755,050, against a valu- 
ation in 1879 of $612,253,600. Here we have a 
shrinkage in six years of $186,501,450, and this fact 
alone should lead us to act cautiously, prudently 
and carefully in the expenditure of money. It 
is your duty, in fact, to make the burden of "taxa- 
tion as liglit as possible, and you have the power 
to accomplish this result. While taking care that 
the expenses of the different departments are cut 
down to figures consistent with good government, 



CITY OOVEKNMENT, 



at the same time we cannot afford to stand still. 
We have to compete for the trade of the country 
with other cities, and we must see to it that no 
interest is neglected. Improvements that pro- 
mote our business welfare as a commercial city, 
improvements that encourage manufacturing 
industry, improvements that tend to preserve the 
health of our citizens and make our city desirable 
as a residence, should not be overlooked. With 
these brief remarks, I now announce that the 
Board is ready to proceed to business. 

NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION. 

On motion of Alderman Woolley a message was 
sent to the Common Council to inform that 
branch thar Hugh O'Brien had been duly elected 
Chairman of the Board. 

Alderman Slade offered an order— That Alder- 
man , with such as the Common Council 

may join, he a special committee to take charge 
of the improved system of sewerage during the 
present municipal year. 

Alderman Slade — My reason for offering this 
order so early is that the committee may possibly 
be completed in the Council today, and 'there are 
some matters in that department that need im- 
mediate attention. 

The order was passed, and Aldermen Slade, 
Caton and Thorndike were appointed on the part 
of the Board. Sent down. 

Alderman Tucker offered an order— That the 
Chairman of the Board of Aldermen be authorized 
to approve bills for expenses incurred by the 
Board of Aldermen and the standing committees 
of the Board not having charge of any appropria- 
tion; also by individual members of the Board 
while engaged in the discharge of official duty; 
the amount of said bills in be eharged to the ap- 
propriation for Contingent Fund of the Board of 
Aldermen. Head twice and passed. 

Alderman Tucker offered an order — That the 
Committee on Claims l>e authorized to draw upon 
the treasurer by special draft in the usual form 
for the payment of all executions or judgments 
of court against the city when properly certified 
to be correct by the City Solicitor. Read twice 
and passed. Sent down. 

On motion of Alderman Breck, the Board pro- 
ceeded to the election of a Committee on Ac- 
counts, with the following result: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

. i mm: | >ii a. Tucker had 12 

George L. Thorndike 12 

Charles V. Whit.ten 12 

and Messrs. Tucker, Thorndike and Whitten were 
declared elcted. Notice Bent down. 

Alderman Viles offered an order, That the rules 
and orders of the Board of Aldermen of 18.79 be 
adopted as the rules and orders ol this Board 

until otherwise ordered, and that Aldermen 

be a committee to examine and report if any al- 
terations are required therein. Passed, and Al- 
dermen Viles, Slade and Walbridge were appoint- 
ed as that committee. 

A message was received from the Common 
Council that that body had organized by the 
choice of Harvey N. Shepard as President, and 
Washington P. Gregg a> Olerk. Placed on file. 

on motion ol Alderman Fly nn, a message was 
sent to the Common Council proposing a conven- 
tion of both branches oi the City Council forth- 
with, for the purpose of choosing a City Clerk for 
the present municipal year. 

Alderman Bell offered an order— That Mon- 
days, at lour o'clock P. M., be assigned as the day 
and hour tor holding the regular meetings of the 

Boaid until otherwise ordered, l'a-si d. 

Alderman Blade offered an order— 1 bat a special 
committee, consisting of three members of this 
p.m. nil, be appointed to determine and pay the 
allowances ol siate aid, pursuant to existing 
of the Legislature; and that said committee have 
power to employ a paymaster and Mich clerical 
assistance as maybe requiredfor that purpose; 
and that the expense be charged to the appro- 
priation for Soldiers' Belief. Passed, and Alder- 
men Slade, Bel] and Walbridge were appointed 
said committee. 

Tne message sent to the Common Council pro- 
posing a convention ol the two branches for the 
election of City Cleik having been returned as 

acted upon in concurrence, the Board proceeded 
to the (Ouncil Chamber to take part in the con- 
vention. 

After the convention was dissolved, the Board 
resumed business. 

An order came down adopting the joint rules 



and orders, with certain amendments, and ap- 
pointing a committee to report necessary changes. 
Concurred, and Aldermen Viles and Slade were 
joined on the part of the Board. 
Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Slade. 

Common Council. 

After the Board of Aldermen retired, the mem- 
bers of the Common Council signed the oaths of 
office. 

Mr. Sweeney, Sr., resumed the chair. 

On motion of Mr. O'llowd of Ward 6, a commit- 
tee to receive, sort and count votes for President, 
was appointed, viz., Messrs. O'Dowd of Ward 6, 
Hilton of Ward 5 and Maguire of Ward 19. 

Mr. Henry Parkman, member elect from Ward 
9, appeared, and the Chief Justice administered 
to him the usual oaths of office. 

The Committee on Ballot for Tresident retired 
and reported as follows: 

Whole number of ballots 67 

Necessary for a choice 34 

Harvey N. Shepard of AVard 1 had (17 

and Mr. Shepard was declared unanimously 
elected. 

Messrs. Whitruore of Ward 12 and Swift of 
Ward 9 were appointed a committee to conduct 
Mr. Shepard to the chair, which they did, and 
Mr. Shepard was introduced as the President of 
the Common Council of 1880. 
President Shepard took the chair and said- 
Gentlemen ot the Common Council— I am un- 
able to express to you my appreciation of your 
kindness in electing ine to this honorable and re- 
sponsible position; but i sincerely thank you. 
Important duties have been committed to us 
which it is expected we shall meet and perform 
with zeal and an eve single to the welfare of the 
city. In a short time you will be called upon to 
elect city officials. 1 think I represent the senti- 
ments of the community when I say thit those 
who have performed their part weil and faith- 
fully should be retained in office, and that a 
change should be made only when clearly de- 
manded by the public good. For some time dis- 
satisfaction has been felt and expressed in 
the community with the manner in which our 
Assessors have been elected. It is expected of 
this Council that they will devise and decide up- 
on some plan which shall be an improvement 
upon the mothods of the past. Without going 
into details I would suggest that we lengthen 
the tenure of office of the principal Assessors, and 
give to them an important voice in the selection 
of their assistants. This department we all rec- 
ognize as one of the most important in City Hall. 
In the performance of its duties it comes home to 
every \ oter and every taxpayer of the citv. It is 
expected that we shall use the public funds with 
a wise and prudent economy— not an economy 
meaning a niggardly policy, nor an economy that 
seeks as its only end the reduction in the salaries 
of the public servants. An efficient public ser- 
vant is generally worth all that he receives, and 
an inefficient public servant should be displaced 
unhesitatingly, for he is dear at any price. We 
should remember that in public and private busi- 
ness, experience is worth something, and that it 
should receive, as it deserves, generous compen- 
sation. 

Wc shall promote an economical administration 
by leaving to the various heads of departments 
the control of their own business, by leaving to 
them the hiring and discharging of their own 
men, and then holding the chiefs to a rigid ac- 
countability for the performance of their duties. 
\\ c -.nail promote an economical administration 
by carefully watching the expenditures and stop- 
ping all the leaks which imperceptibly multiply 
and increase in any large enterprise, by refusing 
to believe that every cry for any improvement is 
a cry from the public; for sometimes it may 
come from interested parties, and the public 
money should be voted only when clearly the de- 
mand comes from the community at large, vet 
there are certaiu improvements concerning which 
we need feel no hesitation. The defective drain- 
age of the city ol Bo-ton must be remedied at any 
cost. We regret today the absence of his Honor the 
Siayar. I am certain I express the wish and feeling 
oi every member of this Council, when I say that 
we sympathize with him in his severe affliction, 
and in this hour of his trial and trouble it is 
proper that we should hear the words of 
those who have given much attention to the mat- 
ter, who from their calling are competent to 
speak, that one cause of that terrible disease — not 



J A NTJARY 



1880 



necessarily in his ease, but in the city at large— is 
the defective drainage of the city of Boston. We 
shall be called upon this year to make some ap- 
propriation toward the completion of the Back 
Bay Park, and it may be that we shall be asked to 
consider the scheme for the building ot the 
Charles River embankment. If so, I trust we 
shall remember that nature has given to the city 
of Boston an opportunity to make itself one of the 
most beautiful cities in the world. There are 
many in the community who think that a large 
park should be laid out within the borders of 
West Roxbury, and there are others who believe 
that the time has come when the natural 
beauties of City Point should be secured 
for the benefit of the public. There 
are other improvements which undoubtedly will 
come before us. As the city increases in its busi- 
ness and population, new wants are felt and will 
make themselves known. We must remember 
that the city of Boston is today the headquarters 
of the largest and most important manufacturing 
industries of this continent; and I trust we shall 
not forget that the rime has been when this city 
was the first in commercial importance in this 
country. Let us so act with a wise and generous 
policy that so far as we are able the city of Bos- 
ton may regain that place of commercial* suprem- 
acy. But in all these matters it is the opinion of 
the community that the public indebtedness 
should not be needlessly increased. Wherever 
possible we should meet the expense of any 
public enterprise from the tax levy and not 
by increasing the indebtedness of the city. It 
will be my part first, to appoint the committees 
of the Common Council. In selecting the men, I 
shall endeavor to consider their qualifications, 
their callings and occupation in life, and in cases 
where it seems to me to be important, to give a 
proper representation upon the committees to the 
different sections of the city. There are two 
classes of men to be found, I doubt not, in this 
Council, as in all other bodies. Some seem willing 
to serve upon many committees, and others 
shrink from committee service. The latter are 
easily accommodated, and the first I hope will re- 
member that if the whole number of committee 
places is divided by the whole number of mem- 
bers of the Council, there will not remain two 
places J or each member of the Council. What- 
ever may be the appointments, I bespeak your 
charitable consideration, that you will believe it 
is my intention to appoint such men as it seems 
to me will best subserve the city's welfare and 
best interest. 

The Committee on Health will be an important 
committee this year. By an ordinance of the last 
Council the Bathing Department was placed in 
charge of the Health Department. It is also 
thought by many that the powers of the board 
should be enlarged. Of equal and even greater 
importance will be the Committee on Water this 
year. It is necessary that a new main be built 
from the reservoir to the city proper, and another 
to the Mystic pumping station. The people of 
East Boston have justly and properly complained 
of the quality of the water furnished them. This 
past year that water became so offensive to taste 
and smell, so injurious to health, that the Mystic 
supply was cut off and the Cochituate supplied in 
its place. But there is not a sufficient head from 
this latter supply to furnish the houses upon the 
high land upon the island. When the Water 
Committee are considering the need of giving an 
increased supply of water to the city of Boston, I 
hope they will also consider the needs of the peo- 
ple of East Boston, and that hereafter they too 
may receive water of good and sufficient quality 
and quantity. 

Two changes that were made in the committees 
last year do not commend themselves to my judg- 
ment. I refer to the committees on Legislative 
Matters and Ordinances. The President, by virtue 
of his office, was made chairman of each of those 
committees. I request of you, gentlemen, that I 
may be excused from serving in that capacity, 
and that you will make such changes in the joint 
rules as will bring about that result. It will be 
my purpose to keep aloof from the discussions 
arid debates of the Council, that my ruling? and 
decisions may be removed as far as possible from 
the suspicion of bias. 

In closing, gentlemen, permit me to ask your 
indulgence, and to express the hope that our 
meetings may be harmonious; that there may be 
no talk or cry of party; but that we may act 
simply as representatives of the citizens' of a 
great "city, determined to accomplish, as far as 



we are able, its good. Again thanking you, gen- 
tlemen, I await your pleasure. 

On motion of Mr. Christal of -Ward 8, a ballot 
for Clerk of the Common Council was ordered. 
Committee — Messrs. Christal of Ward 8, Wheel- 
er of Ward 10 and Sibley of Ward 5. 

While the committee "were out, Mr. Thomas J. 
Denney of Ward 12 appeared, and the usual oaths 
of office were administered to him by the Chief 
Justice. 

The ballot for Clerk resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 71 

Washington P. Gregg had 71 

Mr. Gregg was declared unanimously elected. 

The usual oath of office was administered to Mr. 
Gregg, and he assumed the duties of Clerk. 

On motion of Mr. Greenough of Ward 9, an or- 
der was passed and that gentleman was appoint- 
ed a committee to inform the Board of Aldermen 
that the Council was organized and ready to pro- 
ceed to business. He performed that duty and 
presently reported accordingly. 

A message was received from the Board of 
Aldermen that they had organized, and proposing 
a joint convention for the election of a City Clerk. 
The Council concurred in the request. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 offered an order— That the 
joint rules and orders of the City Council of 1879 
be adopted as the joint rules and orders of the 
City Council of 1880 until otherwise ordered, and 

that Messrs. , with such as the Board of 

Aldermen may join, be a committee to report 
what changes may be necessary. 

The order passed to a second reading. 

Mr. Healy of Ward 10 offered the following as a 
substitute:" 

Ordered, That the joint rules and orders of the 
City Council of 1879 be and are hereby adopted as 
the joint rules and orders of this City Council 
until otherwise ordered, with a change "in rule 1, 
so that the Joint Standing Committee on Legis- 
lative Matters and the Joint Standing Committee 
on Ordinances shall consist of two Aldermen and 
three members of the Common Council; and that 

Messrs. , with such as the Board of Alaer- 

men may join, be appointed to report what fur- 
ther changes, if any, in the joint rules and orders 
are necessary. 

The substitute was adopted, and the order as 
amended was passed. Messrs. Sibley of Ward 5, 
Sweeney, Sr., of Ward 2, and Coe of Ward 23 were 
appointed on said committee. 

Later in the session, on motion of Mr. Healy, 
the vote by which the order was passed was re- 
considered, and the order was amended so that 
the Committee on Ordinances should consist of 
three Aldermen and five members of the Common 
Council. As amended the order was passed. Mr. 
Healy moved a reconsideration, hoping it would 
not prevail. 

Mr. 'tt hitmore of Ward 12 asked if it could be 
reconsidered again, and the President ruled that 
the motion was in order, the order having been 
amended since it was reconsidered, and was vir- 
tually a new matter. 

The reconsideration was lost. Sent up. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 offered an order— That the 
rules and orders of the Common Council of 1879 
be adopted as the rules and orders of this Council 

until otherwise ordered, and that Messrs. 

be a committee to report what changes in said 
rules and orders may be necessary. Passed, and 
Messrs. Sibley of Ward 5, Sweeney, Sr., of Ward 
2, and Coe of "Ward 23 were appointed said com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Christal of Ward S offered an order — That 
joint special committees, each consisting of three 
members of the Common Council, with such as 
the Board of Aldermen may join, be appoint- 
ed to nominate the following-nameo officers: 
Overseer of the Poor, Superintendents of 
Bridges, Clerk of Committees, Superinten- 
dent of Public Buildings, Superintendent of 
Streets. Superintendent of Common and Pub- 
lic Grounds, Superintendent of Public Lands, 
City Architect, Superintendent of Sewers, 
City Messenger, City Engineer, City Surveyor, 
City Registrar, Commissioner for Cedar Grove 
Cemetery, Directors tor Public Institutions, 
Directors of East Boston Ferries, Trustees of Mr. 
Hope Cemetery, Trustees of City Hospital, Com- 
missioner of the Sinking Fund, Auditor of Ac- 
counts, City Treasurer, Collector of Taxes, 
Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters. 

Amended, on motion of Mr. Coe, accepted by 
Mr. Christal. by inserting Managers of the Old 
South Association, and as amended passed. Sent 
up. 



k 



4$ 



CITY GrO VER-JM M KNT 



Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10 offered an order— That 
a joint special committee, consisting of five mem- 
bers of this hoard, with such as the Board of 
Aldermen may join, he appointed to take charge 
of all matters of unfinished husiness relating to 
public parks. 

At this point the proceedings were interrupted 
by the entrance of the members of the Board of 
Aldermen, to hold a joint convention, after which 
the order was passed. Sent up. 

JOINT CONVKNl'IDH. 

Pursuant to the order of both branches, a joint 
convention was held for the election of City Clerk. 
Alderman O'Brien presided. 

Alderman Yiles and Conncilmen Swift and Lov- 
ell were appointed to collect and count votes for 
City Clerk. They reported the result as follows: 

Whole number of votes 84 

Necessan for a choice 43 

S. F. McCleary had 84 

Mr. McCleary was declared elected, and the 
usual oath of office was administered by J. P. 
Healy, City Solicitor. 

The convention then dissolved. 

COMMON CO! N< II. ItKSl MED. 

Mr. Brown of Warn 23 offered an order— That 
Thursday next, at 8 P. M., be assigned as the time 
for the election, on the part of i he Council, of a 
Standing Committee on Finance. Read twice 
and passed, and Messrs. Brown of Ward 2.'(, Ken- 
dricken ol Ward 20, and Howard of Ward 4 were 
appointed a committee to make nominations. 

Mr. ftfagolreot Ward 20 offered an order— That 
the Municipal Register he printed under the direc- 
tion of the Joint Committee on Rules and Orders, 
who mav employ such assistance as may he neces- 
sary; aiid that they also prepare a pocket edition 
of the rules and a list of members and commit- 
tees; the expense to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Printing. Passed. Sent up. 

An order came down for the appointment of a 
joint special committee to take charge of the im- 
proved system oi sewerage during the present 
municipal year. Passed in concurrence, and 

Messrs. Sweeney. Si'., of Ward J, Plimpton of Ward 
81, Clapp of Ward 14. (ireenotigh OI Ward y and 
Brintnall of Ward :; were appointed on the part of 
the Council. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 offered an order— That 
Thursday next, at 8.30 P. M., be assigned as the 
time for the election on the part of this Council 
ot b Standing Oommittee on Accounts, and that 
Messrs. be a committee to nominate the can- 
didates. 

Passed, and Messrs. Fisher of Ward 24, Han- 
cock of Ward I, and Welch of Ward 7 were ap- 
pointed said committee. 

Mr. Plimpton of Ward 21 offered an order— That 
when this Council adjourn, it be to meet on 
Thursday next, at 7.30 P. M., and that that be the 
day and hour of the regular meeting of the Coun- 
cil until otherwise ordered. Passed. 

.Mr. Murphy of Ward 20 offered an order— That 
a standing committee l>c appointed, to consist of 
five members of this Council. 



Passed, and Messrs. Plimpton of Ward 21, 
Denney of Ward 12, Blakemore of Ward 23, 
Wharton of Ward 11, and Ward of Ward 7 were 
appointed said committee. 

Mr. Brown of Ward 2.J offered an order— That 
five members of tins Council, with such as the 
Board of Aldermen may join, he appointed to 
take charge of the improvement of s.ony Brook, 
under the provisions of chapter liKi of the acts of 
1874, with authority to remove obstructions in and 
over said brook or the tributaries thereof, to divert 
the water and alter the course and deepen the 
channel thereof, and to take and purchase such 
lands as may be required for said purpose. 
Passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 offered an order— That a 
joint special committee consisting of five mem- 
bers of this board, with such as the Board of Al- 
dermen may join, be a committee to resume con- 
sideration of the report of the Commissioners on 
the Treatment of the Poor. Passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Cos of Ward 2.'! offered an order— That the 
joint standing and other committees when ap- 
pointed resume the unfinished business appro- 
priate to them referred from last year. Passed. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12—1 have a resolve 
which I wish to oiler, and this seems to be a suita- 
ble time. You all have noticed the unfortunate 
circumstance which has deprived the ceremonies 
of the day of a great deal of their imnressiveness. 
I refer to the absence of his Honor the Mayor, 
and the unfortunate domestic occurrence which 
compels that absence. That has been referred to 
by you. sir, in your address. I offer the following: 

Resolved, That the members of the Common 
Council of 1880 deeply regret the domestic afflic- 
tion which has prevented the attendance of his 
Honor tht Mayor at the inaugural proceedings, 
and that they respectfully offer their warmest 
sympathy to him on his ter'rib'e bereavement. 

Ordered, That the President of the Council be 
requested to sign and transmit a copy of this 
resolve to his Honor the Mayor. 

The resolve and order were passed by a unani- 
mous rising vote. 

Mr. Howard of Ward 4 moved that the seats of 
the members be selected under the rule. 

Mr. Lauten of Ward 14 moved that the late Pres- 
ident have the hist choice of a seat. 

M r. Sawyer of Ward 18 moved that the two 
senior members— Messrs. Sweeney, Sr., and Mr. 
Sibley— have the first choice. 

Mr. Sibley — Mr. Sibley is no more a senior mem- 
ber than his colleague, Mr. Pray of Ward 5. 

The President— Will the gentleman from Ward 
18 indicate whom he means ? 

Mr. Sawyer — I mean the three senior members. 

Mr. Lauten accepted the amendment. 

The motion as amended was declared lost. Mr. 
Lauten doubted the vote, and the Council was 
divided — 20 for, 50 against. 

The members proceed to draw for seats in the 
usual manner, after which the Council adjourned 
on motion of Mr. Taylor of Ward 16, and stood 
adjourned until Thursday next at IK P. M. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 8, 1880. 



Regular meeting at 7% P. M., Harvey N. Shep- 
ard, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Order for the Committee on Claims to draw 
upon the Treasurer, by special draft, for pay- 
ment of all executions and judgments of court 
against the city. Passed in concurrence. 

Certificate of the election of Aldermen Tucker, 
Thorndike and Whitten as a Committee on Ac- 
counts on the part of the Board. Placed on file. 

AUDITOR'S EXHIBIT. 

The Auditor's exhibit for Jan. 1 (City Doc. No. 
4), was received. Sent up. 

Total appropriations, $12,657,453.73; expended, 
$8,730,722.29; unexpended, $3,926,731.44. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The report of the Police Commissioners on the 
doings of the department for December was re- 
ceived. Sent up. 

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

A request was received from the School Com- 
mittee for additional accommodations for the 
Prince School. Referred to the Joint Committee 
on Public Instruction. Sent up. 

SCHOOL' EXPENDITURES. 

The following was received: 

City ©f Boston, ) 
Rooms of School Committee, \ 
Boston, Jan. 6, 1880. ) 
To the Honorable the City Council of the City of 
Boston— The Committee on Accounts'of the School 
Committee respectfully represent that their esti- 
mates of expenditures required to carry on the 
public schools for the current financial year, pre- 
sented to the City Government Feb. 1, 1879, were 
as follows : 

Salat ies of instructors $1 ,11 1,273 

" " officers 50,760 

School expenses 250,100 

Total #1,418,133 

The amount appropriated by your honorable 

body was as follows : 

For salaries of instructors $1,055,000 

" " "officers 50,000 

" school expenses 195,000 

Total #1,300,000 

Total reduction made by the City Council % 118,133 

The Committee on Accounts of the School Com- 
mittee used the greatest care in making their esti- 
mates for the year, calculating the precise 
amounts to be paid to each instructor, instead of 
estimating at the maximum salary for all of them, 
as had been the custom of their predecessors in 
office. 

The appropriation made was to cover the finan- 
cial year from May 1, 1879, to May 1, 1880, but the 
instructors had alreadv been elected and their 
salaries fixed for the school year ending Aug. 31, 
1879, and no material reduction in this item could 
be made applicable to the first five months of the 
financial year. To make a reduction of $118,133 
in the remaining seven months of the year, which 
was at the rate of $200,000 per annum, was not 
considered practicable by the School Board. The 
salaries of the instructors were reduced in 1877 
and again in 1878, and the board were almost 
unanimously opposed to a further reduction 
for the present year. In carrying out the 
plan adopted for supplying the pupils of 
the publu schools with text books and sta- 
tionery, the School Board have expended a 
large amount in the purchase of such material, 
estimated at $82,393 for the last six months. As 
an offset to a considerable portion of this item, 
the supply agent has in his hands bills against 
parents and guardians, who have promised to 
pay them in "March next, amounting to about 
$40,000, and against those who represented them- 
selves as unable to pay them, bills for over $50.- 
000, such a portion of which will be made collect- 



able as the Board ot Assessors may determine in 
the next tax bills. The amount of books and 
other supplies now in the hands of the supply 
agent is estimated at $37,000. 

With these explanations the Committee on 
Accounts respectfully submit that the amount 
deducted from the appropriations asked for for 
the current financial year are absolutely needed 
to carry on the schools till the end of that year. 
They, therefore, respectfully request your honor- 
able body to make an additional appropriation of 
$118,113 for school expenditures for the remainder 
of the current financial year as follows: 

For salaries of Instructors $62,383 

" " School officers 3,750 

For school expenses 52,000 

Total appropriation needed $118,133 

In making the appropriations for the current 
year, your honorable body directed the School 
Committee "to discontinue all the schools for the 
residue of this year" when the appropriations 
were exhausted. At the meeting of the School 
Committee held Jan. 6, 1880, the following order, 
intended to carry out these instructions, was pre- 
sented and was laid on the table : 

Ordered, That all the public schools of the city 
of Boston be discontinued for the residue of the 
year, from and including Feb. 21, 1880; and that 
all instructors be discharged from the service of 
the city at the close of school hours on the 20th 
day of February, 1880. 

The Committee on Accounts, authorized to act 
as a Committee of Conference, respectfully re- 
quest your honorable body to appoint a committee 
with whom they may confer in regard to the sub- 
ject of this communication. 

For the Committee on Accounts of the School 
Board. William T. Adams, 

Chairman. 

Mr. Parkman of Ward 9—1 move that the com- 
munication be referred to the Committee on 
Public Instruction when appointed, and that 
that committee serve as a committee of confer- 
ence on the part of the City Council; and further, 
that the Committee on Public Instruction consid- 
er and report what further legislation is necessa- 
ry concerning the relations of the City Council 
with the School Board. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12—1 entirely agree 
with the motion as offered, but I desire to offer, 
as a further amendment, a matter which will un- 
doubtedly meet the approval of the gentleman 
from Ward 9. I will offer the order, with one 
change, which will be found in City Doc. 108 of 
last year. I am very sorry that in the last Council 
there was no opportunity to examine the subject 
on which I submitted a minority report last 
month. It came before the Committee on Public 
Instruction last year on an order in regard to 
transferring- some of the powers now held by the 
City Council to the School Committee, involving 
mainly the idea of having the School Committee 
certify the school tax,which should be assessed and 
collected separately on the tax bill, but at the 
same time that the other tax bills are collected. 
I ventured to point out at that time the action 
taken last year by the School Board. I pointed 
out the fact that while the City Council had no 
control over the expenditures of "the School Com- 
mittee in regard to nearly all of the items in their 
expenses, we had duriug the year cut down tbe 
approDriations to a considerable amount, and 
saved some $118,000 on the sum total. But now 
the School Committee come to us and tell us very 
properly that we did n't understand our business: 
that we undertook to cut down accounts of which 
we know nothing, and the result would be a diffi- 
culty in the School Department. I therefore offer 
the order in City Doc. 108, leaving out the clause 
in regard to the custody of the school buildings, 
and move that it be also referred to the Commit- 
tee on Public Instruction. 

The order offered by Mr. Whitmore is as fol- 
lows: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the Legislature, at its next session, 
for the passage of a law transferring to the School 
Committee of Boston the charge of all expendi- 
tures connected with the public schools; and di- 
recting the city officers to assess and collect a 
separate tax for school purposes, in the same 
manner that a State tax and a county tax are now 
assessed upon and collected from the taxpayers 
of Boston. 

Mr. Parkman— Do I understand the gentleman 
from Ward 12 to offer his amendment as a substi- 
tute for my motion? 



6 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



The President— I do not understand he desires 
that your order shall not lie referred as moved, 
hut that his order shall also be referred to the 
committee. Am I right ? 

Mr. Whilinore— That was to he t .he effect of it : 
but as his motion was a little indefinite, 1 thought 
my order would accomplish the result intended m 
the latter part ol his motion. 

Mr. Child of Ward 17— I believe it is I or a peti- 
tion to tl.e next session ol the Legislature. 
should it not be altered to mean the present sea 
sion'? 

The President— It is a subjeet for tin commit- 
tee to consider, and i suppose they will report the 
order in proper form. 

The whole subject was referred to the commit- 
tee on Public Instruction when appointed. Sent 
up. 

SJ \ r Ol k NUMiu.i: OOJ) CJtSTKD. 

Mr. Whitinore of Ward 12 presented the fol- 
lowing: 

To the Honorable Common Council of the city 
of Boston — The undersigned desires to contest 
the seat now occupied by John E. Bowker from 
Ward b;, for these reasons, viz. : That the re- 
count of votes as made by the Bo^rd of Alder- 
men was incorrect, and mote votes were cast for 
John .1. Seollard than for .John E. Howkcr; that 
more ballots were thrown and counted than there 
were checks on the voting lists, and that the 
names of men were checked on the voting list 
who did not vote, sufficient to change the result 
ot the election. Your petitioner therefore prays 
that the Common Council will investigate the 
matter through its appropriate committee. 
\ eiy respectfully. 

• Ioiin .1. SCOLLABD, 

Referred to the Standing Committee on Elec 
tions. 

INTRA Ml UAL 1 NTElt.MENTS. 

Mr. I'erkins of Ward 17 presented the following: 
Oi i in: OF i hi: BOABD OF Hi \ i i n. i 
Boston, Jan. 8, 1880. | 

To tin Honorable <<ti/ Council of Boston. Gen- 
tlemen—In view of the fact that several of the 
cemeteries within the thickly populated parts of 
the city have already been used to such an extent 
that the grounds have become completely satu- 
rated with the poisonous gases evolved by decom- 
position, so that the further disturbance ot the 
grounds or use of the tombs therein for burial 
purposes must of necessity be detrimental to 
public health, and in view also of t lie fact that all 
laws heretofore passed have proved ineffectual 
tor closing such tombs, the Hoard of Health re- 
spectfully petitions your honorable body to ob- 
tain such legislation as will prevent further buri- 
als in the following cemeteries, to wit, King's 
Chapel, Granary, Copp's Hill, Central, South, 
Kustis-strcet, Kearsarge, St. Augustine; to the 
end that said several plots of ground may 
be carefully preserved from desecration, and for- 
ever kept as interesting memorials of the past, 
and as breathing places for future generations. 
Respectfully, 

S. H.JDOBOIH, Chairman. 

Referred to the Joint Committee on Health to 
be appointed, on motion of Mr. Perkins. Sent up. 

ORDKR FOB NOMINATING I'O.MMl I 1'EI S, 

On motion of Mr. Maguire of Ward 19, the rule 
was suspended, and he offered an order— That 
joint special committees, each consisting of three 
members of the Common Council, with such as 
the Hoard of Aldermen may join, be appointed to 
nominate candidates for Trustees of the Public 
Library, City Solicitor, Water Registrar and 
Commissioner of Prison Point Bridge. Passed. 
Sent up. 

BULBS AND ORDERS OF Till: common COUNCIL. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 submitted the following 
(City Doc. No. 6): 

The committee appointed to prepare rules and 
orders for the government of the Common Coun- 
cil for the year 1880, having considered the sub- 
ject, would respectfully recommend that the rules 
"and orders for the Common Council of 1K79, as 
printed in the Municipal Register for that year, 
with the amendment adopted May 20, 1879, be 
adopted as the rules and orders for the govern- 
ment of this Council, with the following amend- 
ments, namely: 

Section 25. Add the following: "The Council 
shall not be adjourned for want of quorum until 
the fact that a quorum is not present has been 
assertained by calling the roll of members." 



Sect. 41. Insert before the word "motions," in 
the seventh line, on page 62, of said Municipal 
Register, the words "notices of." 

Respectfully submitted, 

"iodwin Sibley, 

Chairman. 

The question was upon accepting the report 
and adopting the rules as changed. 

Mr. Whitmore— 1 move that this report he ac- 
cepted, and that the recommendations of the 
committee be specially assigned to the next meet- 
ing of the Council at eight o'clock: and for this 
reason — I have for some time past had occasion 
to examine the rules of the Common Council, and 
I think I can convince the Council, whenever the 
time conies, that something more is desirable 
than the mere hasty glance which has been given 
to them by the committee at this time. I think T 
can demonstrate to the Council that some ol the 
rules are unnecessary, Some contradictory, and 
that considerable changes in the way of extension 
and greater accuracy of expression axe necessai \ 
to make the rules as' gooil as they should be. 1 
did not anticipate that this report would make 
such slight changes and be sent in tonight. If I 
had thought so, I would have endeavored to be 
prepared to state what changes would be worthy 
of consideration. But 1 desire to remind 
the Council that these rules have been in 
existence for a number of years, with 
very slight changes, and at the present 
time there is a discussion going on with regard to 
parliamentary law which will be very instructive 
tons. I refer to the changes going on in the 
rules of the National House of Representatives. 
I think it ought to be considered that, the Nation- 
al House of Representatives occupies the same 
position in this country in regard to parliamen- 
tary law that Parliament docs in England; and 
when a committee has been engaged in changing 
the rules of the House, I think it will be worth 
while for us to look them over before we adopt 
ours. Gentlemen may not have looked that mat- 
ter over as closely as i have. The report has been 
sent in to the House of Representatives, and I no- 
tice the matter has come before them today; 
probably the amended rules will be adopted dur- 
ing the present week. For that reason, I hope 
the Council will let this matter go over for a 
week. I move that the report be accepted and 
the consideration of the subjeet assigned to the 
next meeting of the Council at eight o'clock. 

Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10— I would like to hear 
from some of the committee on this subject. I 
have no doubt they have examined it very thor- 
oughly. 

fir. Sibley of Ward 5— I believe there is amo- 
tion beforethe House to accept the report of the 
committee. If there is any objection to doing so, 
I would answer it; but I don't understand there 
is. 

Mr. Coc ol Ward 23 called for a division of the 
question. 

Mr. Christal of Ward *— I hope the suggestion 
of my friend from Ward 12 will prevail, as this is 
a very important matter which should receive 
due consideration. There are many new members 
of the Council who perhaps are not familiar with 
the workings and operations of the Council, and 
who are particularly interested in the city's wel- 
fare; and as this is such an important matter, I 
hope it will be assigned to the next meeting. As 
a member of the Council last year, I feel like con- 
sidering it myself. 1 have been led to regard the 
rules oi t lie Council as very imperfect, and I think 
they are worth more consideration than we have 
given the matter. 1 am willing to give the new 
members an opportunity to consider the matter, 
as desired by my friend from Ward 12, and 1 hope 
it will prevail. 

The report of the committee was accepted, and 
the question came on assigning the further con- 
sideration of the subject to the next meeting. 

Mr. Sibley— While 1 do not oppose the motion of 
the gentleman from AVard 12, 1 wish to state that 
this matter has been pretty carefully examined 
and looked over. We failed to see where we 
could make any great improvement. The whole 
subject was worked over very carefully by a com- 
mittee appointed by the gentleman from Ward 12 
last year, and we have lived and acted under the 
rules. The changes are very slight. We have 
only made some few alterations in the number of 
members on some committees. I should hope it 
will pass. I am as much in favor of improvement 
as any other member on the floor, and I want the 
the best; but I hope the matter will not be as- 
signed. The committee were unanimous in the 



J" A N UARY 8 



1880 



changes, and they would be glad to receive any 
further light if the matter was referred to them. 

Mr. Christal — I do not feel, as one member of 
this Council, that I am obliged to take for granted 
what any member of the committee may see fit to 
adopt. I don't doubt the quality of the commit- 
tee. But I consider that there are probably gen- 
tlemen in this Council Chamber who are as intel- 
ligent as they are, and know as much as they do; 
and I think it is ungrateful to force upon these 
men what the committee have done. I am in- 
clined to treat everybody justly, and, therefore, I 
am opposed to forcing upon any member anything 
that is not satisfactory, or that is not intelligent- 
ly understood by them. Therefore I am opposed 
to the passage of the order now. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21—1 had the honor of serv- 
ing on the Committee on Rules and Orders two 
years ago with the gentleman from Ward 5, who 
lias just spoken, and I have taken some special 
pains to examine the rules of the Council as they 
have heretofore existed. While I can understand 
that the gentleman from Ward 12 is quite well 
versed in parliamentary law,'is somewhat skilful 
in handling it, and may take a deep interest 
in the proceedings at Washington, I fail to 
understand why the special rules, or mod- 
fications of rules which take place in the Na- 
tional House of Representatives, are of any par- 
ticular interest to us in this body. This set of 
Tules, substantially, has been in force for years, 
and the older members of this Council, who" have 
been here for a greater or less length of time, are 
familiar with them. They are familiar with the 
phraseology and workings of the rules, and with 
the pages and lines of the book in which we find 
them. There will be a certain interruption of 
that familiarity by adopting a different phrase- 
ology or arrangement of the rules. So, on general 
principles, I should be in favor of continuing 
these rules, unless some very important changes 
should be found to be desirable. Now, the gen- 
tleman asks for a postponement for a week from 
tonight, and, meantime, he hopes the Xational 
House of Representatives will make changes in 
their rules. We probably shall not have the re- 
sult of the changes of those rules until the next 
meeting, and then a postponement of the con- 
sideration of the subject will be just as necessary 
then as now. I think the wiser way will be to 
adopt the rules and allow the committees to be 
appointed under them, and the machinery of the 
city to go on in the usual way; and when the gen- 
tleman is prepared to present changes here, and 
convince us ot their necessity, they can be adopt- 
ed at some future time as well as at present. 

Mr. Swift of Ward 9 — I agree with the gentle- 
man who has just spoken, that any change made 
in our rules ought to have a strong* reason to sup- 
port it. But at the same time I don't see why this 
matter should not be considered carefully, and if 
there are important changes which gentlemen 
wish to suggest, I think we ought to give them a 
chance to do so. A change was suggested by the 
President in his address at the opening of the 
Council this year, and I see the committee have 
not adopted that suggestion. 

The President — The gentleman will pardon me. 
We are simply considering the rules of the Coun- 
cil, and not the joint rules. 

Mr. Swift — Then what I would say does not ap- 
ply to this. But I don't see any reason why we 
should not give an opportunity for suggesting 
changes. Of course we can do what we like about 
adopting them when suggested. 

Mr. Cnristal— When 1 entered this Council 
Chamber about a year ago, I thought it very im- 
proper that men with more experience than my- 
self should wish to impress things upon me that 
I had no knowledge of. I feel it my duty not to 
impress upon gentlemen in this chamber that 
which I don't know anything about myself. 
Therefore i can't see what injustice can be done 
to the rules and orders to have them discussed at 
the next meeting. It is a very important matter, 
and I don"t see why the older members should 
impress upon the younger ones the necessity of 
maintaining the rules and orders about which 
there are conflicting and various opinions. 

Mr. O'Dowd of Ward 6 called for the special as- 
signment for 8 P. M., viz., election of a Commit- 
tee on Finance, which was taken up and disposed 
of as shown below. Consideration of the rules of 
the Council was resumed. 

The question was upon assigning the subject to 
the next meeting at 8 P. M. 

Mr. Whitmore— I desire to reply briefly to one 
or two of the gentlemen who have spoken 



on the opposite side. What my friend Sibley of 
Ward 5 has already explained did not 
refer to this report. He said the commit- 
tee had made important changes in the 
numbers of members on the committees. 
His reference was to the report on joint rules and 
orders which have not been presented. In regard 
to the remarks of the gentleman from Ward 21, 
Mr. Pratt, the only reply I think it necessary to 
make is this: It i- not necessary to make any 
formal adoption of new rules to enable the Chair 
to appoint these committees. We have already 
adopted the rules of last year, and if we adopt 
new joint rules the business of the city can go on. 
But the great difference is this: After we have 
adopted these rules it is almost impossible to 
get the necessary two-thirds vote to make any 
change. I should dislike at this time to enter 
upon a debate, because it will be necessa- 
ry to point out many errors and required 
changes in the rules. I can only say, if the 
rules are not altered, members will find them 
very defective, particularly during the present 
year. The rules are very defective and very in- 
convenient, and for that reason I ask the Council 
to wait until the next meeting, and I hope the mo- 
tion to assign will be adopted. 

The motion to assign was declared lost. Mr. 
Whitmore doubted the vote; the Council was 
divided— 13 for, 43 against. 

The question then came upon adopting the rec- 
ommendations in the report of the committee. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward -1 — I should have voted to 
postpone were it not that I think we can accom- 
plish the same object by another amendment. I 
therefore move that the rules be adopted, with 
the exception of section 30. 'Ihe effect will be 
that they can be altered by a bare majority at the 
next meeting, and we can then adopt rule 30, and 
thereby clinch the matter so that" only a two- 
thirds vote can change them. 

Air. Whitmore — I think the gentleman means 
rule 72. Rnl 3 30 is the corresponding section of 
the rules of the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Bailey — The gentleman is right. It is rule 
72. Any member will understand the effect will 
be that'at the next meeting if any member desires 
to offer an amendment he can bring it in and a 
majority of the Board can adopt it. By adopting 
the other rules there will be no interference 
with business. After the adoption of rule 72 
the rules can only be changed by a two-thirds 
vote. 

Mr. Bailey's motion prevailed and the rules were 
declared adopted, except rule 72, which provides 
that the rules can only be amended or suspended 
by a two-thirds vote. " 

A motion to reconsider, by Mr. Coe, hoping it 
would not prevail, was lost." 

ELECTION OF A FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Brown of Ward 23 submitted a report from 
the special committee to nominate a Finance Com- 
mittee, recommending the election of 

Henry F. Coe, 

Daniel J. Sweeney, Sr., 

Paul H. Kondricken, 

Thomas X. Hart, 

Charles F. Austin, 

Francis W. Pray, 

Henry X. Sawyer. 
The report was accepted and an election or- 
dered. Committee— Messrs. Brown of Ward 23. 
Swift of Ward 9, Perkins of Ward 17. 

A recess of five minutes was taken, on motion 
of Mr. Greenoagh of Ward 9, after which the 
committee reported — 

Whole number of votes, 71; necessary for a 
choice, 36. Each of the nominees of the commit- 
tee had 71 votes, and they were declared elected. 
Certificate sent up. 

JOINT Rl'LES AND ORDERS. 

Mr. Siblev of Ward 5 submitted the f olio win sr 
(City Doc. 5): 

The joint special committee appointed to pre- 
pare rules and orders for the government of the 
City Council during- the present municipal year, 
having considered the subject, would respectfully 
recommend that the following changes be made 
in the rules and orders of the last City Council, 
namely: 

Section 1. Providing that the Joint Standing 
Committee on Health shall consist of three Al- 
dermen and live members of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

Providing that the Joint Standing Committee 
on Legislative Matters shall consist of two Alder- 
men and three members of the Common Council. 



8 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Dispensing with the Joint Standing Committee 
on Bathing, the duties of that committee having 
heen transferred to the Board of Health. 

Providing that the Joint Standing Committee 
on Ordinances shall consist of three Aldermen 
and five members of the Common Council. 

Providing that the Joint Standing Committee 
on Water snail consist of three Aldermen and five 
members of the Common Council. 

Section 12. Add the following: "And he shall 
notify each member of the City Council of all 
public committee hearings." 

The accompanying order covers the proposed 
changes, and your committee would respectfully 
recommend its passage. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Clinton Viles. 
Lucius Slade. 

I'.llWIN Sim.i n . 

Daniel ,). Sweeney. 
Henky F. Cue. 

Ordered, That the following rules and orders 
be adopted for the government of the City Coun- 
cil during the present year: 

1. At the commencement of the municipal year 
the following joint standing committees shall be 
constituted, namely: 

A Committee on Accounts, to consist of three 
Aldermen and five members of the Common Coun- 
cil, all to be chosen by ballot. 

A Committee on Finance, to consist of the 
Mayor, the chairman of the Board of Aldermen, 
ex officii*, and seven members of the Common 
Council, to be chosen by ballot. 

The following committees shall be appointed, 
namely: 

A Committee of the Assessors' Department) to 
Consist of three Aldermen and five members of 
the Common Council. 

A Committee on Claims, to consist of three 
Aldermen and five members of the Common 
Council. 

A Committee on Common and Public (J rounds, 
to consist of tbree Aldermen and five members of 
the Common Council. 

A Committee on the City Engineer's Depart- 
ment, to consist of two Aldermen and three mem- 
bers of the Common Council. 

A Committee on City Registrar's Department, 
to consist of two Aldermen and three members of 
the Common Council. 

A Committee on East Boston Ferries, to consist 
of three Aldermen and five members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

A Committee on the Fire Department, to con- 
sist of two Aldermen and three members of the 
Common Council. 

A Committee on Fuel, to consist of two Alder- 
men and three members of the Common Council. 

A Committee on the Harbor, to consist of two 
Aldermen and three members of the Common 
Council. 

A Committee on the Health Department, to con- 
sist of three Aldermen and five members of the 
Common Council. 

A Committee on the City Hospital, to consist of 
two Aldermen and three members of the Common 
Council. 

A Committee on Legislative Matters, to consist 
of two Aldermen and three members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

A Committee on Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove 
Cemeteries, to consist of two Aldermen and three 
members of the Common Council. 

A Committee on Ordinances, to consist of three 
Aldermen and five members of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

A Committee on the Overseers of the Poor, to 
consist of two Aldermen and three members of the 
Common Council. 

A Committee on Police, to consist of two Alder- 
men and three members ol the Common Council. 

A Committee on Printing, to consist of two Al- 
dermen and three members of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

A Committee on Public Buildings, to consist of 
three Aldermen and five members of the Common 
Council. 

A Committee on Public Institutions, to consist 
of three Aldermen and five members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

A Committee on Public Instruction, to consist 
of three Aldermen and the President and tour 
member's of the Common Council. 

A Committee on Public Lan s, to consist of two 
Aldermen and three members of the Common 
Council. 
A Committee on the Public Library, to consist 



of three Aldermen and five members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

A Committee on Salaries, to consist of three 
Aldermen and five members of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

A Committee on Laying out and Widening 
Streets, to consist of three Aldermen and five 
members of the Common Council. 

A Committee on City Surveyor's Department, 
to consist of two Aldermen and three members of 
the Common Council. 

A Committee on the Department for the Survey 
and Inspection of Buildings, to consist of two Al- 
dermen and three members of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

A Committee on the Treasury Department, to 
consist of two Aldermen and three members of 
the Common Council. 

A Committee on Water, to consist of three Al- 
dermen and five members of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

Organization of Committees. 

2. The member of the Board of Aldermen first 
named on every joint committee, of which the 
Mayor is not a member, shall be its chairman; 
and in case of his resignation or inability, the 
other members of thefsame Hoard in the order in 
which they are named, and after them the mem- 
ber of the Common Council first named, shall call 
meetings of the committee and act as chairman. 

Powers and l>uHes of Committees. 

3. The Committee on Salaries shall report to 
the City Council, in February or March, orders 
establishing the salaries of the several city offi- 
cers for the ensuing year; and the report of said 
committee shall designate particularly the 
changes, if any, proposed in said salaries. 

4. The Committee on Legislative Matters shall, 
unless otherwise ordered, be authorized to appear 
before committees of the General Court, and rep- 
resent the interests of the city; provided said 
committee shall not, unless directed so to do by 
the City Council, oppose any legislation petition- 
ed for by the preceding City Council. 

5. The joint standing committees shall cause 
records of their proceedings to be kept in books 
provided for that purpose,' and at all meetings of 
committees the record of the previous meeting 
shall be read, unless otherwise ordered by the 
committee. 

6. The representatives of the two branches of 
the City Council on joint committee shall not act 
by separate consultations. No meeting of any 
committee shall be called upon less notice than 
twenty-four hours, without the consent of all the 
members thereof. 

7. Any joint standing or special committee 
may, unless otherwise provided, expend from the 
appropriation of which, by ordinance or order of 
the City Council, it has charge, an amount not 
exceeding two hundred dollars for any one object 
or purpose. 

Conference Committees. 

8. In every case of disagreement between the 
two branches of the City Council, if either branch 
shall request a conference, and appoint a com- 
mittee of corference, and the other branch shall 
also appoint such a committee, both committees 
shall, at an hour to be agreed upon by their chair- 
men, meet and state to each other, verbally or in 
writing, as either shall choose, the reasons for the 
action of their respective branches in relation to 
the matter in controversy, shall confer freely 
thereon, and shall report to their respective 
branches. 

Reports of Committees. 

9. No report of a joint committee shall be re- 
ceived by either branch of the City Council unless 
agreed to by such committee at a duly notified 
meeting thereof. 

10. The report of every joint committee upon 
any subject referred to it shall, unless otherwise 
ordered by the City Council or by the committee, 
be presented to the branch in which the order of 
reference originated. And it shall be the duty of 
every joint committee to which any subject may 
be specially referred, to report thereon within 
four weeks, or to ask for further time. 

11. All reports and other papers submitted to 
the City Council shall be written in a fair hand, 
and no indorsement of any kind shall be made on 
the reports, memorials, or other papers referred 
to a committee. Every report of a committee 
shall be signed by a member belonging to the 
body to which it shall be presented, unless other- 
wise directed by the committee. 



JANUARY 8 



18 8 0. 



9 



The Joint Standing Committee on Legislative 
Matters shall report, in print, to the City Council 
all bills, resolves and petitions presented to the 
Legislature in behalf of the city of Boston, or any 
department thereof. Such printed report shall 
be made at the next meeting of either branch 
after such application is made, or earlier, at the 
discretion of said committee. 

12. The Clerk of Committees shall, at the re- 
quest of the chairman, make copies of any papers 
to be reported by a committee, and he shall notify 
each member of the City Council of all public 
committee hearings. 

Ordinances, Orders and Resolutions. 

13. If an" ordinance, order or resolution, origi- 
nating in one branch, is rejected in the other, 
notice shall be given by the clerk to the branch in 
which the same originated. 

The adoption of a substitute shall be deemed a 
rejection of the original order, aud notice as 
above shall be given. 

14. All by-laws passed by the City Council shall 
be termed "Ordinances," and toe enacting style 
shall be— "Be it ordained by the Aldermen and 
Common Council of the City of Boston in City 
Council assembled. " No order or vote which, if 
passed, would have the effect to amend, suspend 
or repeal an ordinance, shall be entertained in 
either branch of the City Council, unless it is in 
the form of an ordinance 

15. In all votes, when either or both branches 
of the City Council express anything by way of 
command, 'the form of expression shall be "Or- 
dered"; and when either or both branches ex- 
press opinions, principles, facts or purposes, the 
form shall be "Resolved." 

appropriations and Expenditures. 

16. In the present and every future financial 
year the specific appropriation for the several ob- 
jects enumerated in the general appropriation or- 
der shall be deemed and taken to be the maximum 
amount to be expended by the several committees, 
boards and officers having the charge thereof, for 
the entire financial year, and shall be expended 
with a proper regard thereto. Whenever the 
amounts designated and appropriated as afore- 
said have been expended, and an additional sum 
is required, or whenever the estimates for the 
completion of any object, or for any purpose, ex- 
ceed the appropriation specially made therefor, 
or whenever an expenditure is required for an ob- 
ject, or a purpose, not contemplated at the time 
the appropriation was made, the committeej 
board or officer having charge thereof shall fur- 
nish to the City Council a detailed statement in 
print of the expenditures already made, and the 
necessity for an additional appropriation; and no 
contract shall be made, nor expenditure author- 
ized in either case, unless provision for the same 
shall be made by special transfer from some of 
the appropriations contained in the general ap- 
propriation bill or by loan. 

17. When application shall be made for an ad- 
ditional appropriation, to be provided for by 
transfer <r loan, such appropriation shall not be 
made until the application has been referred to, 
and reported upon by, the Committee on Finance. 

18. No order authorizing the borrowing of 
money, or the transfer of one appropriation or 
part of an appropriation to another appropriation, 
shall be passed, unless two-thirds of the whole 
number of the members of each branch of the 
City Council vote in the affirmative by vote taken 
by yea and nay. 

19. No presiding officer of a board, or chairman 
of a committee, unless duly authorized by such 
Doard or committee, shall approve any bill or ac- 
count against the city. 

20. No bills for refreshments or carriages fur- 
nished to any member of the City Government 
shall be paid unless such bills shall specify in de- 
tail the names of the members to whom such re- 
freshments or carriages were furnished, the dates 
of furnishing the same, and shall be approved by 
the presiding officer of a board, or chairman of a 
committee, duly authorized thereto. The presid- 
ing officer of a board, or chairman of a committee, 
shail not approve any bill for refreshments fur- 
nished on any day other than the day of meeting 
of such board or committee, or any bill for re- 
freshments which includes liquors, cigars, or any 
bill for refreshments furnished to any person not 
a member of such board or committee, unless spe- 
cially authorized to do so by vote of such board 
or committee. 

Such bills, when so approved, shall be paid from 
the appropriation to which they are incident; and 



the Auditor of Accounts shall not pass any such 
bill for the approval of the Committee on Ac- 
counts,unless it has been approved as provided in 
this or the preceding section. 

21. All carriages furnished to the members 
of the City Government, shall, whenever prac- 
ticable, be ordered through the City Messenger; 
and when not so ordered, the person who 
orders them shall forthwith give notice 
thereof to the Ciiy Messenger; and in all 
cases the party who furnishes a carriage 
shall, within seven days thereafter, return 
to the City Messenger a detailed statement of the 
names of the persons who used the same, and of 
the time during which and the purpose for which 
it was used. 

22. All bills for refreshments or carriages, 
including items, incurred more than three 
months previous to the date of their presentation 
to the Auditor, shall go before the City Council 
for approval. 

23. The foregoing rules shall not be altered, 
amended, suspended, or repealed, at any time, 
except by the votes of two-thirds of the members 
of each branch of the City Council. 

The report was accepted and the question was 
upon giving the order a second reading. 

Mr. Whitmore — Notwithstanding the reluctance 
of the Council to attend to these matters, I con- 
sider it my duty to bring before the Council at 
the present time one or two changes in the joint 
rules and orders, because I believe they are im- 
peratively demanded by the necessities of public 
business. I have no objection to make to the first 
of the rules as it stands, in regard to the various 
committees. I regret, however, that the commit- 
tee should not have considered the propriety of 
putting into the list some of the joint special com- 
mittees which continue on year after year. I do 
not see why the improved sewerage, public parks 
and Stony Brook should not rise to the dignity of 
joint standing committees. They are liable to be 
carried on from one year to another, and I don't 
see why they should be called joint special com- 
mittees any more than any other. But the main 
proposition I have to offer is to the sixteenth rule 
in regard to appropriations and expenditures. 

Mr. Whitmore offered the following amend- 
ments: 

Rule 16. In line 12, strike out "or whenever an 
expenditure is required for an object or a purpose 
not contemplated at the time the apnropriation 
was made," and add New Rule 17— "Any expendi- 
ture directed or allowed to be made by any com- 
mittee, board or officer, for any object br purpose 
not included in the annual estimates, shall be 
met by a transfer of the required amount to the 
appropriation for such committee, board or offi- 
cer, or by charging such amount to the appropri- 
ation for Incidentals, or to the Reserved Fund, as 
the Council may in each case direct." 

Rules 17 and 18 become New Rules 18 and 19. 

New Rule 20. "No contract shall be made for 
services or supplies beyond the period of the 
financial year by any committee, board or officer, 
unless they or he have been empowered to do so 
by vote of the Council." 

Mr. Whitmore— As the matter stands now, this 
clause, which was interjected at some time by 
some committee not particularly well versed with 
the drawing up oi rules, does not express what 
the framers probably intended. I speak of this 
because it is a case of which I spoke when I 
said the rules needed revision. This matter 
ought to be attended to at the present time. I 
had an opinion in regard to it last year from the 
City Solicitor, in regard to the appropriations, 
and he expressed himself very clearly and decid- 
edly vhat the rule was not properly worded. That 
is the case, as he expressed it to me, in regard to 
the rules of the Common Council. As the section 
originally stood, and should stand now, it proj 
vides that when any department has expended its 
money and wants some more, it shall put into 
this Council a statement of its expenditures. 
That is right and proper, and should be so under- 
stood. As the clause stands now, if they wish to 
spend a sum of money for a cause not contem- 
plated at the commencement of the year, they are 
required to furnish an account of their entire ex- 
penditures for the whole of the year. That is un- 
necessary and annoying. For that reason 1 moved 
that those words be removed from that place, and 
a new rule be added covering exactly the 
same point— that any expenditure contracted 
or allowed to be made by any board or officer for 
any purpose not included in the annual estimates, 
shall be met, etc. In other words, if the Commit- 



10 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



tee on Public Buildings are required by us to ex- 
pend two or three thousand dollars for a purpose 
not contemplated in the annual estimates, as the 
rule is now they are required to come in and give 
a statement of their regular expenditures. Under 
the amendment they will only have to make such 
a statement when they have exceeded their regu- 
lar appropriation. Tne object of this rule is to 
Srevent unnecessary trouble and bother to the 
epanments, as I know they have been so troubled 
in the past, and difficulties have arisen. The other 
change which I have offered is to substitute a new 
rule after the present rule 18, that no contracts 
shall be made for services or supplies for a period 
beyond the financial year by a board or officer, un- 
less they are empowered to do so by vote of the 
City Council. .My reason is this: We had a case 
come up last year where the Committee on Paving 
were about to contract for gravel for live years at 
a very high price. The question was submitted to 
the City Solicitor as to what power the committee 
had to go beyond their term of office and bind 
the city mi regard to the expenditure of 
money and use of material. In that case, if 
the city had made that very improvident contract 
we should have been required to use a certain 
kind of gravel for five years, and it would have 
to be taken from a certain pit. The City Solicitor 
at that time stated that the rule in regard to 
contracts was very bard to suit. It was impossi- 
ble to state how tar one committee could bind its 
successors hereafter, and he thought in that case 
the gravel might be nought for a year or two. It 
was at a time when the contract for supplies for 
the School Board attracted much attention. I do 
not know that this amendment is in the best 
possible shape, but I offer it because 1 think we 
ought to have it somewhere in the general rules 
as a protest against any officer, committee or 
board entering into indiscriminate contracts with- 
out our knowing it. Take the case of the commit- 
tees on Improved Sewerage and Public Buildings. 
We give them power to make such contracts, but 
in other eases I think the contracts should be ex- 
amined before they are accepted. I think there 
can be no difference of opinion whatever in re- 
gard to the change in rule 16, because it is really 
necessary. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 2S — I hope these amendments 
proposed by the gentleman from Ward 12 will be 
voted down. If he has any amendments or new 
rules, let him offer them independently, and let 
them be referred to the committee, who will give 
them due consideration. We might adopt the 
joint rules here in the same manner as we have 
the rules of the Common Council, leaving out the 
twenty third rule, that they shall not be altered 
except by vote of two- thirds of the members. 
That will give an opportunity far us to propose 
new rules to be considered by the committee and 
reported upon by them; and if they recommend 
a change it can be adopted by a majority vote. 
The rules found in this book have been the rules 
and orders of the City Council for several years 

East, and have worked very veil indeed. I have 
een a member oi this body three years. We had 
no trouble the first two years I was here. The 
trouble all came last year, owing to the peculiar 
manner in which they were administered. The 
gentleman seems disposed to bring in new rules 
and force them upon us. 1 am perfectly willing to 
have them properly considered, but he cannot ex- 
pect us to adopt such inles without proper con- 
sideration. Let us adopt these rules, and then let 
himjbring in his amendments, and let the commit- 
tee consider them. 1 would suggest that the 
rules be adopted as the rules of the Council were, 
which will be perfectly fair to every one. 

Mr. ChristaJ of Ward s— In order'to give perfect 
satisfaction to every one, as my friend seems to 
think special consideration is necessary, I would 
move the special assignment of the subject to the 
next meet in- of the Council at nine o'clock. 

Mr. Whit more— I am perfectly willing to agree 
to the suggestion of the member from Ward 23. 
My objection to passing these rules now is to 
clinching them when we have had no opportunity 
Of considering them. The operation of the twen- 
ty-third rule would prevent any changes here- 
after. If the gentleman is willing to leave out the 
clinching of the twenty-third rule, I am perfectly 
willing to withdraw my amendment for the time 
being, with the understanding that they shall be 
laid upon the table and printed and assigned to 
the next meeting, or referred to his committee. 1 
do not think it will make much difference which. 
They will come back from his committee without 
being greatly altered, whether indorsed there or 



not. But it is right and proper that the Council 
should look at this matter and see if the changes 
should be made. It is apparently the desire of 
members that the committees shall be appointed, 
which is laudable, perhaps. But as a preliminary 
I would move that the amendments be printed 
and specially assigned to the next meeting. 

Mr. Bailey Of Ward 4—1 would suggest that the 
gentleman withdraw his motion, because if the 
motion to postpone and print should prevail, it 
woulci carry the whole subject. 

Mr. Whitmore— I withdraw it. 

The question was upon ordering the order, with 
the exception of rule 23, to a second reading, as 
moved by Mr. Coe. 

Mr. Sibley— 1 have no objection to that motion 
being carried. I wish for all the light we can get 
on parliamentary practice, even If we get it 
from the State House or National House ol Rep- 
resentatives. If gentlemen desire to improve the 
rules I hope it win be indulged to the fullest ex- 
tent. My only desire at this moment is that we 
shall proceed to business. With the exception of 
myself I may safeh sa\ we have had as able men 
at work upon this matter as we have in this 
Council. Speaking of the City Solicitor, he has 
been consulted. I think that rule 10 as printed, 
perhaps a few words could be taken out, or 
changed by the dot of an "i" or the cross of a "t"; 
but 1 believe it is the fullest protection we can 
have for the funds of the city, and no man on the 
boards or committees has objected to it. I hope 
it will be passed tonight, and what light the gen- 
tleman from Ward 12 may have I nope he will 
bring forward. 

The order as reported by the committee, except 
rule 23, was passed to a second reading, read a 
second time, and passed. 

A motion to reconsider by Mr. Whitmore, hop- 
ing it would not prevail, was lost. Sent up. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward Is called up the special 
assignment, viz., election of a Committee on Ac- 
counts, which was considered, and then consider- 
ation of the rules and orders was resumed. 

Mr. Whitmore moved that his amendments to 
the joint rules be printed, and specially assigned 
to the next meeting at eight o'clock. 

Mr. Parkman moved as a substitute that they 
be referred to the Committee on Joint Kules and 
Orders, which motion was put and declared 
adopted. 

Mr. Whitmore inquired whether a motion to 
postpone to a certain day did not take preference 
of the motion to commit. 

Tne President said that it would, and he would 
put the question if Mr. Whitmore insisted. 

Mr. Whitmore — I don't care. I withdraw my 
motion. 

Sent up. 

ELECTION OP COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS", 

Mr. Fisher of Ward 24 submitted a report from 
the special committee appointed to nominate a 
Committee on Accounts, recommending the 
election of 

John A. Kidney, 
John Taylor, 
Malcolm s. Greenough, 
Otis 1!. Dudley, 
Lewis R. Tucker. ■ 
The report was accepted, and on motion of Mr. 
Fisher the Council proceeded to ballot. 

Messrs. Fisher of Ward 4, Hancock of Ward 1, 
and Welch of Ward 7 were appoiuted to receive 
and count votes. 

A recess of five minutes was taken, on mction 
of Mr. Sibley, after which the committee re- 
ported: 

Whole urn nber of votes 71 

Necessary for a choice 36 

John A. Kidney had 71 

John Taylor 66 

Malcolm P. CJreenough 69 

Otis B. Dudley 70 

Lewis R. Tucker 70 

T.J. Dennev 1 

.1. I'. Magnire 1 

The nominees of the committee were declared 
elected. 

Bll.l.s in in. Al.l.ovt ED. 
Mr. Kidney of Ward 6 offered an order— That 
all bills for refreshments or carriage hire in- 
curred by the Common Council, the standing com- 
mittees of the Common Council not having charge 
of any appropriation, or individual members of 
the Common Council while engaged in the dis- 
charge of official duty, give the names of the per- 
sons Incurring the same, and after having been ap- 
proved by the committee or certified to by the 



J AN U ARY 



8 



18 8 



11 



members -who incurred the same, the President of 
the Common Council is authorized to approve the 
same, as provided in the annual appropriation 
order under the head of Contingent Fund 
of the Common Council; and the Auditor of 
Accounts is authorized to allow the same for pa5'- 
meiit, provided that no bill shall be approved by 
the President unless it shall be presented to him 
for approval before the e*d of the month next 
succeeding that within the expense covered by 
such bill was incurred. Read twice and uassed. 
A motion to reconsider by Mr. Kidney, hoping it 
would not prevail, was lost. 

OLD STATE HOUSE. 

Mr. Whitniore of Ward 12 offered an order — 
That his Honor the Mayor be requested to peti- 
tion the next Legislature for the passage of an 
act to prevent the City Government from selling, 
or removing, or materially altering the external 
appearance of the Old State House in Boston. 
Ordered to a second reading and laid over, at the 
suggestion of the mover. 

STAJs'DIKG A5D SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

The President announced the following ap- 
pointments of committees: 

Nominating Committees. 

Overseers of Poor— Messrs. Viles of Ward 8, Na- 
son of Ward 3, Donanoe of Ward 15. 

Superintendents of Bridges— Messrs. Christal 
of Ward 8, Hilton of Ward 5, Clapp of Ward 14. 

Clerk of Committees — Messrs. Kendricken of 
Ward 20, Perkins of Ward 17, O'Dowd of Ward 6. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings — Messrs. 
Murphy of Ward 20, Pray of Ward 5, Brown of 
Ward 23. 

Superintendent of Streets — Messrs. Swift of 
Ward 9, Bailey of Ward 4, McLaughlin of Ward 6. 

Superintendent of Common — Messrs. Sibley of 
Ward 5, Devlin of Ward 13, Parkman of Ward 9. 

Superintendent of Public Lands — Messrs. Aus- 
tin of Ward 11, Taylor of Ward 16, Hollis of 
Ward 25. 

City Architect— Messrs. Whitmore of Ward 12, 
Hartof Ward 18, Wharton of Ward 11. 

Superintendent of Sewers — Messrs. Kidney of 
Ward 6, Fitzpatrick of Ward 8, Freeman of Ward 
10. 

City Messenger— Messrs. Howard of Ward 4, 
Hancock of Ward 1, Folan of Ward 13. 

City Engineer— Messrs. Hilton of Ward 5, Child 
of Ward 17, Farwell of Ward 15. 

City Surveyor— Messrs. Sawyer of Ward 18, 
Sweeney, Jr., of Ward 2, Hosley of Ward 15. 

City Registrar— Messrs. Blakemore of Ward 23, 
Denney of Ward 12, Bigelow of 'Ward 25. 

Commissioners on Cedar Grove Cemetery — 
Messrs. Dudley of Ward 4, Maguire of Ward 19, 
Clapp of Ward 24. 

Directors for Public Institutions— Messrs. Bow- 
ker of Ward 16, Coe of Ward 23, Wyman of Ward 
21. 

Directors of East Boston Ferries— Messrs. An- 
thony of Ward 19, Blakemore of Ward 23, Lovell 
of Ward 1. ♦' 

Trustees of City Hospital — Messrs. Taylor of 
Ward 16, Lauten of Ward 14, Williams of Ward 11. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery— Messrs. Fisher 
of Ward 24, Tucker of Ward 14, Taylor of Ward 
16. 

Commissioners of Sinking Funds — Messrs. 
Plimpton of Ward 21, Coe of Ward 23, Doherty of 
Ward 7. 

Auditor of Accounts — Messrs. Sweeney, Sr., of 
Ward 2, Healy of Ward 10, Barry of Ward 16. 

City Treasurer— Messrs. Sawyer of Ward 24, 
Sweetser of Ward 3, Devine of Ward 20. 

City Collector — Messrs. Morrison of Ward 17, 
Brimbecom of Ward 18, Lane of Ward 13. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters— Messrs. 
Clapp of Ward 14, Doherty of Ward 2, McXamara 
of Ward 19. 

Managers of the Old South Association— Messrs. 
Swift of Ward 9, O'Dowd of Ward 6, Lovell of 
Ward 1. 

Trustees of Public Library— Messrs. Healy of 
Ward 10, Sweetser of Ward 3, Rogers of Ward 22. 

City Solicitor— Messrs. Wheeler of Ward 10, 
Pratt of Ward 21, Ward of Ward 7. 

Water Registrar— Messrs. Greenough of Ward 
9, Perkins of Ward 17, Cronin of Ward 12. 

Commissioner of Prison Point Bridge— Messrs. 
Siblev of Ward 5, Dudley of Ward 4, Brintnall of 
Ward 3. 



Joint Standing Committees. 

Assessors' Department — Messrs. Kidney of 
Ward 6, Wyman of Ward 21, Taylor of Ward 16, 
Maguire of Ward 19, Child of Ward 17. 

City Hospital— Messrs. Perkins of Ward 17, 
Hosly of Ward 15, Nason of Ward 3. 

City Registrar's Department — Messrs. Blake- 
more of Ward 23, Hart of Ward 18, Welch of 
Ward 7. 

Claims — Messrs. Swift of Ward 9, Devlin of 
Ward 13, Healy of Ward 10, Sawyer of Ward 18, 
Perkins of Ward 17. 

Common — Messrs. Siblev of Ward 5, Wyman of 
Ward 21, Parkman of Ward 9, Doherty of Ward 2, 
Devlin of Ward 13. 

East Boston Ferries — Messrs. Hancock of Ward 

I, Christal of Ward 8, Dudley of Ward 4, Ken- 
dricken of Ward 20, Sweeney, Jr., of Ward 2. 

Engineer's Department— Messrs. Austin of Ward 

II, Fisher of Ward 24, Fitzpatrick, of Ward 8. 
Fire Department— Messrs. Bowker of Ward 16, 

Morrison of Ward 17, Hollis of Ward 25. 

Fuel— Messrs. Wheeler of Ward 10, Sweeney, 
Jr., of Ward 2, Clapp of Ward 24. 

Harbor— Messrs. Doherty of Ward 7, Farwell of 
Ward 15, Lane of Ward 13. 

Health— Messrs. Pray of Ward 5, Doherty of 
Ward 7, Williams of Ward 11, Farwell of Ward 15, 
Barry of Ward 16. 

Legislative Matters— Messrs. Healy of Ward 10, 
Bailey of Ward 4, Ward of Ward 7. 

Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove Cemeteries — Messrs. 
Plimpton of Ward 21, Clapp of Ward 24, Denney 
of Ward 12. 

Ordinances— Messrs. Whitmore of Ward 12, 
Wheeler of Ward 10, Fisher of Ward 24, Wharton 
of Ward 11, Bailey of Ward 4. 

Overseers of the Poor— Messrs. Viles of Ward 8, 
Nason of Ward 3, Donahoe of Ward 15. 

Police— Messrs. Kidnev of Ward 6, Hancock of 
Ward 1, Welch of Ward 7. 

Printing— Messrs. Sawyer of Ward 18, Sweeney, 
Sr., of Ward 2, Lauten of Ward 14. 

Public Buildings— Messrs. Clapp of Ward 14, 
Brintnall of Ward 3, Kendricken of Ward 20, 
Brown of Ward 23, BowKer of Ward 16. 

Public Institutions— Messrs. Brown of Ward 23, 
Sawyer of Ward 18, Austin of Ward 11, Lovell of 
Ward 1. Murphy of Ward 20. 

Public Instruction— Messrs. Coe of Ward 23, 
Pratt of Ward 21, Morrison of Ward 17, Tucker of 
Ward 14. 

Public Lands— Messrs. Freeman of Ward 10, 
Doherty of Ward 2, Pray of Ward 5. 

Public Library—Messrs. Coe of Ward 23, Dudley 
of Ward 4, O'Dowd of Ward 6, Child of Ward 17, 
Hosly of Ward 15. 

Salaries— Messrs. Hiltou of Ward 5, Devine of 
Ward 20, Viles of Ward 8, Brimbecom of Ward 18, 
McLaughlin of Ward 6. 

Streets— Messrs. Lauten of Ward 14, O'Dowd of 
Ward 6, Howard of Ward 4, Sawyer of Ward 24, 
Swift of Ward 9. 

Surveyor's Department— Messrs. Sibley of Ward 
5, Hancock of Ward 1, Christal of Ward 8. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings — Messrs. 
Anthony of Ward 20, Hilton of Ward 5, Fitzpat- 
rick of Ward 8. 

Treasury Department— Messrs. Sweetser of 
Ward 3, Hart of Ward 18, Bigelow of Ward 25. 

Water— Messrs. Greenough of Ward 9, Howard 
of Ward 4, Lovell of Ward 1, Williams of Ward 11, 
Hollis oi Ward 25. 

Joint Special Committees. 

Public Parks— Messrs. Pratt of Ward 21, Park- 
man of Ward 9, Maguire of Ward 19, Sweetser of 
Ward 3, Blakemore of AVard 23. 

Stony Brook— Messrs. Brown of Ward 23, Taylor 
of Ward 16, Anthony of Ward 19, Wheeler of 
Ward 10, Brimbecom of Ward 18. 

Treatment of Poor— Messrs. Sawyer of Ward 24, 
Lauten of Ward 14, Bigelow of 'Ward 25, Mc- 
Namara of Ward 19, Rogers of Ward 22. 

Standing Committees of the Common Council. 

Paving— Messrs. Lauten of Ward 14, Sawver of 
Ward 24, McLaughlin of Ward 6, Cronin of 'Ward 
12, Folan of Ward 13. 

Judiciary— Messrs. Whitmore of Ward 12, 
Wheeler of Ward 10, Fisher of AVard 24, Wharton 
of Ward 11, Bailey of Ward 4. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Coe of Ward 23. 



BOARD O F ALD ERMEN. 



12 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 13, 1880. 



■Joint Convention of the City Council to Hear 
the Inaugural Address of his Honor the 
Mayor. 

Board of Aldermen, ) 
Monday, Jan. 12, 1880. ) 
A special meeting of the Board of Aldermen was 
held at noon, today, pursuant to a call by the 
Mayor. Alderman O'Brien, Chairman, presided. 
Alderman Flynn offered an order — That a mes- 
sage be sent to the Common Council, proposing 
a convention of both branches of the City Coun- 
cil forthwith, for the purpose of hearing the inau- 
§ural address of his Honor the Mayor. Passed, 
ent down. 

Notice was received soon after that the Council 
had concurred in the request. fc 

His Honor the Mayor entered the chamber, and 
with the members of the Board and City Clerk, 
proceeded to the chamber of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

A special meeting of the Common Council was 
held at noon today, pursuant to a call by the 
Mayor. Harvey N. Shepard, President, occupied 
the chair, and a quorum of the members was 
present. 

An order came down proposing a joint conven- 
tion for the purpose of hearing the inaugural 
address of his Honor the Mayor. The Council 
concurred. Notice sent up. 

His Honor the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen 
and City Clerk presently entered the Council 
Chamber, and a joint convention was held. 

After the convention, the Board returned to 
their chamber and adjourned. 

IN JOINT CONVENTION. 

In joint convention his Honor the Mayor pre- 
sided and delivered his inaugural address, after 
which the convention dissolved. 

IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

After the convention dissolved, the following- 
business was transacted: 

Mr. Healy of Ward 10 offered an order — That 
his Honor the Mayor be requested to furnish a 
copy of his address, that the same may be printed. 
Passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 offered an order— That a 
special committee be appointed to report what 
disposition shall be made of the topics in the May- 
or's inaugural address. Passed. And Messrs. Coe 
of Ward 23, Healy of Ward 10, and Sweeney, Jr., 
of Ward 2 were appointed on said committee. 
Sent up. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE RULES. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12 offered certain 
amendments to the rules of the Common Council, 
stating that he did so to save time at the next 
meeting. He moved that they be printed and 
specially assigned to the next meeting. 

The President said he would not read the 
amendments unless requested to do so. 

Mr. Parkman said it was moved and car- 
ried at the last meeting, that amendments to the 
rules be referred to the Committee on Rules and 
Orders. 

Mr. Whitmore said it was understood at the 
last meeting that he should propose his amend- 
ments, and he availed of this opportunity te save 
time. If there is any objection he would with- 
draw the amendments. 

Mr. Coe moved to refer to the Committee on 
Rules. 

The President ruled that the motion to assign 
took precedence. 

The motion to print and assign was lost. 

By unanimous consent Mr. Whitmore withdrew 
the amendments. 

COMMITTEES CHANGED. 

The President said Mr. Morrison of Ward 17 re- 
quested to be excused from serving on the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction, and that Mr. Bailey 
of Ward 4 made the same request in regard to the 
Committee on Legislative Matters. 

Both gentlemen were excused by vote of the 
Council, and the President appointed Mr. Fisher 
of Ward 24 on the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters, and Mr. Wharton of Ward 11 on the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction. Sent up. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Coe of Ward 23. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., Alder- 
man O'Brien, Chairman, presiding. 

RULES AND ORDERS OF THE BOARD. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following: 

The committee appointed to prepare rules and 
orders for the government of the Board of Alder- 
men for the year 1880 having considered the sub- 
ject, would respectfully recommend that the rules 
and orders of the year 1879, as published in the 
Municipal Register for that year, be adopted as 
the rules and orders of this Board, with the fol- 
lowing amendment: 

Insert after section 29 a new section, to read as 
follows : 

Sec. 30. It shall be the duty of the City Messen- 
ger to see that no person or persons excepting 
members of the City Government and reporters 
are allowed in the chamber of the Board of Alder- 
men or in the ante-room of the same, while the 
Board are in session, and after the seats furnished 
for spectators have been occupied. 
For the committee. 

Clinton Viles, Chairman. 

Alderman Viles — The only alteration made in 
the rules is the one that has been hanging in the 
lobby, and which we passed last year during the 
early part of the session. We have embodied it 
in the rules this year. 

The report was accepted, the recommendations 
of the committee adopted, and the rules as amend- 
ed were adopted. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS. 

A report came down with an order adopting the 
joint rules and orders of the City Council of last 
year, with certain amendments. The Board con- 
curred. 

STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

In accordance with the rules adopted by both 
branches, the Chairman, on behalf of his Honor 
the Mayor, announced the following committees: 
Standing Committees of the Board. 

Armories — Aldermen Flynn, Slade, O'Brien. 

Bridges — Aldermen Woolley, O'Brien, Wal- 
bridge. 

County Accounts — Aldermen Tucker, Bell, 
Thorndike. . 

Faneuil Hall and County Buildings — Aldermen 
Whitten, Flynn, Breck. 

Lamps — Aldermen O'Brien, Breck, Tucker. 

Licenses— Aldermen Breck, Bell, Caton. 

Markets— Aldermen Slade, Viles, Bell. 

Paving— Aldermen Slade, Flynn, Tucker. 

Sewers — Aldermen Viles, O'Brien, Thorndike. 

Steam Engines — Aldermen Caton, Woolley, 
Tucker. 

Streets — Aldermen Flynn^ Viles, Woolley. 
Joint Standing Committees. 

Assessors' Department — Aldermen Breck, Bell, 
Thorndike. 

City Hospital— Aldermen Walbridge, Thorn- 
dike. 

City Registrar's Department— Aldermen Viles, 
Tucker. 

Claims— Aldermen Breck, Tucker, Whitten. 

Common — Aldermen O'Brien, Flynn, Breck. 

East Boston Ferries — Aldermen Viles, Bell, 
Thorndike. 

Engineer's Department — Aldermen Woolley, 
Thorndike. 

Fire Department — Aldermen Woolley, Wal- 
bridge. 

Fuel— Aldermen Tucker, Caton. 

Harbor— Aldermen Bell, Woolley. 

Health — Aldermen Viles, Bell, Caton. 

Legislative Matters— Aldermen O'Brien, Tuck- 
er. 

Mount Hope and Cedar Grove Cemeteries — Al- 
dermen Whitten, Tucker. 

Ordinances — Aldermen Breck, Thorndike, Whit- 
ten. 

Overseers of the Poor— Aldermen Bell, Caton. 

Police— Aldermen Viles, Walbridge. 

Printing— Aldermen O'Brien, Viles. 

Public Buildings— Aldermen Slade, O'Brien, 
Thorndike. 

Public Institutions— Aldermen O'Brien, Slade, 
Woolley. 

Public Instruction — Aldermen Tucker, Bell. 
Walbridge. 

Public Lands— Aldermen O'Brien, Thorndike. 



13 



BOARD OF ALDERMKN, 



Public Library— Aldermen Thorndike, Slade, 
W bitten. 

Salaries— Aldermen Slade, Flynn, Woolley. 

Streets— Aldermen Flynn, Yiies, Woolley. 

Surveyor's Department— Aldermen hell", Thorn- 
dike. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings— Aldermen 
Caton, Viles. 

Treasury Department— Aldermen Whitten, Wal- 
bridge. 

■Water— Aldermen Thorndike, Tucker, Viles. 

Joint Special Committees. 

Public Parks— Aldermen Breck, O'Brien, Whit 
ten. 

Stony Brook— Aldermen Viles, O'Brien, Thorn- 
dike. 

Treatment of the Poor— Aldermen Walbridge, 
Bell, Whitten. 

Nominating Committees. 

Overseers of the Poor— Tucker and Flynn. 

Superintendents of Bridges — Flynn and Wool- 
ley. 

Clerk of Committees— Tucker and Caton. 

Superintendent of Common— Slade and Thorn- 
dike. 

Superintendent of Streets— Breck and Wal- 
bridge. 

Superintendent of Public Buildiugs— Caton and 

Superintendent of Public Lands— Walbridge and 
Woolley. 

City Architect— Slade and Bell. 

Superintended of Sewers— Yiles and Tucker. 

City Messenger— Caton and Viles. 

City Engineer— Whitten and Caton. 

City Surveyor — Thorndike and Hell. 

city Registrar — Viles and Walbridge. 

City Solicitor— Slade and Whitten. 

Water Registrar — Viles and Walbridge. 

Commissioner of Cedar drove Cemetery — Wal- 
bridge and Caton. 

Directors of Public Institutions — Bell and 
Flynn. 

Directors of East Boston Ferries— Thorndike 
and Breck. 

Trustees of City Hospital— Flynn and Slade. 

Trustees of Public Library— Tucker and Whit- 
ten. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery— Bell and Wool- 
ley. 

Commissioner of Sinking Fund— Whitten and 
Viles. 

Auditor of Accounts— Breck and Woolley. 

City treasurer — Whitten and Tucker. 

City Collector— Thorndike and Slade. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters— Woolley 
and Viles. 

Managers ol Old South Association— Breck and 
Walbridge. 

Commissioner of Prison Point Bridge— Flynn 
and Bell. 

CHEAP POSTACH2— INTKRN ATIONA L MEMORIAL. 

The following was received: 

City Hall, Maviiii's oiiick, Jan. 12, 1880. 

To the Honorable Board of Aldermen — I here- 
with transmit tor such action as you may see tit, 
a communication from the Lord Mayor ol London, 
Eng., in relerence to a proposed international 
memorial commemorating the introduction of the 
system of cheap postage. 

Frederick O. Prince, Mayor. 
London, Jan. 10, 1880. 

To the Mayor of Boston— Today being the 
fortieth anniversary of the introduction of the 
penny-postage system, founded by Sir Rowland 
Hill, a meeting has just been held at the .Mansion 
House, and a committee formed to commemorate 
the event by an international memorial. Look- 
ing at the immense commercial, intellectual and 
social advantages derived by the world at large 
throujj.li this reform, I claim your hearty sym- 
pathy and support in this movement, by placing 
it before the citizens ol your great city. Mr. 
John Pinder, president of the Direct United 
States Cable Company, who was present at the 
meeting, has kindly offered the free use of the 
Direct cable for any telegrams on the subject. 

[Signed] Thk Lord Mayor ok London. 

On motion of Alderman Sla.le the subject was 
referred to a special committee, and Aldermen 
Slade and Whitten were appointed said com- 
mittee. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTME.Vls. 

Public Weigher— William R. Reeve, confirmed. 
Mayor's Clerk— F. E. Goodrich. Sent down. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Polite on the part of the 
Board. Patrick Doberty, to be released as surety 
from bond of James M. Walsh, a constable of this 
city. 

To the Police Commissioners. Albert Morse et 
al., that coasting be allowed on Columbia street. 
Ward 24. 

To the Committee on Health on the Part of the 
Board. Thomas M. Stevens, to occupv new wood- 
en stable for three cows and one horse on Spring 
street, Ward 23. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Gilbert Williams, 
for street lamps on Elm street, between Bartlett 
and Bunker Hill streets, Charlestown; E street 
Congregational Society, for street lamps in E 
street, between Fourth street and Broadway; 
Fred Rudolph et al., for lamps on Lainartine and 
Gilbert streets, Ward 23; W. H. Gallagher et al., 
for more oil lamps on Blue Hill avenue, from Co- 
lumbia to Harvard street. 

To the Comiw9tce on Public Lands. Bernard 
Lennon, to be paid for damages to his estate, 3- 
Orange Court, by reason of raisin u the grade of 
the North am pton-street district in 1874. 

To the ./dint Committee on Survey and Inspec- 
tion a/ Buildings. W. L. Marks, to enlarge wood- 
en building on rear Cambridge street; (ieorge 
Burwell, to project druggist's mortar at 83 Charter 
street. 

To the Committee on Police. J. Gardner Clapp 
et al., for an extra force of night police. 

To the Committee om>ewera. Samuel 8. Drew 
et al., for a sewer on Downer avenue, Dorchester. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims, .lames O 
Safford & Co., for interest on certain money held 
by the city under trustee process; Mary Shea, to 
be paid tor personal injuries caused "by alleged 
defect at 141-143 Fourth street, on Jan. 4," 1880. 

To the Joint Committee on Assessors' Depart- 
ment. Louis B. Schwarz, for refunding of certain 
taxes. 

To the Committee on Paving. Metropolitan 
Railroad Company, to construct a double track in 
Washington street, Dorchester, in place of the 
single track now in sain street; 8. S. Drew et al., 
for the grading of a part of Downer avenue, Dor- 
chester; T. C. Brown, for a plank walk on Engle- 
wood avenue, Brighton District; F. Bleiler, 
that Heath place be graded ; M. H. Nor- 
ton et al., that Olney and (ieneva streets 
be put in order, and that sidewalks be laid, 
etc.; notice of hearing by railroad commission- 
ers on petition of Midland Railroad Asso- 
ciates on Wednesday next; Frank H. Skinner et 
al., that Marlborough street, between Hereford 
street and West Chester park, be macadamized; 
Augustus Parker, et al., that Blue Hill avenue, 
between Warren and Columbia streets, be put in 
proper condition tor public travel; also that a 
portion Ol Wayne street be rilled to the proper 
grade; Henry M. Wild rt ol., for flagging crossing 
across Cambridge street, from Howard avenue to 
Franklin street, Brighton District. 

petition for sii:\m knc.ine. 

A petition was received from the Chadwick 
Lead Works, for leave to erect and use a station- 
ary steam engine at 173 High street, and an order 
of notice was passed for a hearing thereon on 
Feb. 2. 

PAPERS PROM THE common COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Order to resume unfinished business in hands 
of joint standing committees. Passed in concur- 
rence. 

Order for preparation of the Municipal Regis- 
ter. Passed in concurrence. 

Report ol Police Commissioners for month of 
December, 1879. Placed on tile. 

Request ol School Committee for additional ac- 
commodations tor the Prince School scholars. 
Relerred to Committee ou Public Instruction in 
concurrence. 

Auditor's exhibit of the state of the several ap- 
propriations on Jan. 1, 1880. (City Doc. 4.) Placad 
on file. 

An order (as on file) for the Mayor to petition 
for an act to divorce the responsibility of all 
school expenditures from the City Council and to 
allow a separate tax for school expenses to be as* 
sessed. Referred to the Committee on Public In- 
struction in concurrence. 

Request of the Board of Health that authority 
be obtained to close all tombs, in certain ceme'. 
teries, against future interments therein. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Health in concur- 
rence. 



J A 1ST IT A KY l^J 



18 8 Q . 



14, 



Appointment of the Committee on Public, In- 
struction as a committee to conferwith a commit- 
tee on the school board on the subject of the 
necessity of a further appropriation for school 
purposes. Concurred. 

Certificate of the election of a Committee on 
Finance on the part of the Common Council. 
Placed on tile. • 

An order came down requesting a copy of the, 
Mayor's inaugural address, that the same may be 
printed. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for a special committee to report what 
disposition shall be made of the topics in the 
Mayor's address. Passed in concurrence, and Al- 
dermen Flynn and Whitten were appointed on 
the part of the Board. 

Notices of vacancies in the committees on Pub- 
lic Instruction and Legislative Matters, and of 
the filling t& the same. Placed on file. 

Amendments proposed to the joint rules and 
orders. Referred to the committee on that sub- 
ject in concurrence. 

LAMP DEPARTMENT. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Lamps (City Doc. No. 3) was received and sent 
down. 

Th^re has been quite a large increase in the 
number of public lamps during the year, the 
larger portion of which are located in the sub- 
urban sections of the city, where oil is used. 

Constant and pressing petitions have been made 
for the locat on of new lamps in the outlying dis- 
tricts, and for the lighting of rear passageways in 
the older section of the city (where they are de- 
manded as police necessities), which have been 
fenerally regarded by the committee as reasona- 
le requests. 

Price Paid for Gas for Public Lamps. 

City proper #1 ,75 per thousand cubic feet. 

South Boston 2.25 " " " 

East Boston 2.25 " " " 

Roxbury 2.25 " " " 

Dorchester 2.75 *' '•• " 

Brookline 2.50 " " " 

Brighton 2.50 " 

West Knxhury 2.75 " " " 

Charlestown.' 2.25 " 

Early in the year 1878 the committee deemed it 
proper that a further reduction in price should 
be made, and the following reductions were 
agreed upon by the several gas companies : 
City proper, from $2.00 per thousand to #1.90 
Soutli lioston, " 2.40 " '• " 2.25 

East Boston, " 2.40 " " " 2.25 

Roxbury, " 2.40 " " " 2.25 

Dorchester, " 2.90 " " " 2.75 

Brookline, " 2 90 " " " 2.75 

Brighton, " 2.90 " " " 2.75 

W. Roxbury, " 2.90 " " " 2.75 

Charlestown, " 2.40 " " " 2.25 

These reductions aggregate about twenty-five 
thousand dollars per annum. 

The committee of 1879 made an effort for the re- 
duction in the price of gas, which at first they did 
not succeed in obtaining, but subsequently the 
Boston Gas Light Company reduced their price 
from .$1.90 per M. cubic feet to $1.75, and still later 
the Brookline Gas Company reduced their charge 
rom 2.75 per M. cubic feet to $2.50. 
The result being a saving to the city at the rate 
of about eight thousand dollars per annum. 
Employes. 
The number of men employed is one hundred 
and tnirty-six, as follows: 

One superintendent, one clerk, one hundred 
and thirty lighters, and four permanent men in 
the repair shop. 

No deputy superintendents or supernumerary 
men are employed. 

The men (one'hundred and six in number) who 
light and clean the gas lamps are paid at the fol- 
lowing rates: 

City proper , 41 men, 

South Boston 8 " 

East Boston 5 " 

Charlestown 7 " 

one and one-half cents per lamp per night; while 
in 

Roxbury 20 men, 

Dorchester 13 " 

Brookline 1 man, 

Brighton 5 men, 

West Roxbury .. 6 men, 

are paid at the rate of $1.50 per day. 

The men who light the oil lamps are twenty-four 
in number, as follows: 

City proper 1 man, 

South Boston 4 men. 

East Boston 2 " 

Roxbury 1 man, 



Dorchester. ; 6 men. 

West Roxbury .1 ." , ; 

Brighton... , 3 '• 

are paid at the rate of three cents per lamp per 
night. •/ 

Nearly all the men that light oil lamps use 
horses and wagons with which to perform their 
duties, for which the city pays no extra compen- 
sation. 

Broken Lanterns. 
The number of lanterns which have been report- 
ed by the police as broken the past year was... 170, 

Rv the lamplighters 8,727 

Taken out by repairers without report 860 

Total 9,757 



63 



Lanterns destroyed 

Against— 

Broken in 1875 8,268 

" l>-7fi 7,444 

" " 1877 7,527 

" " 1878 7,587 

There were 2371 of the public lamps broken by 
the memorable hailstorm on the 16th of July, 1879, 
destroying more than seven thousand lights of 
glass. 

All repairs of the lanterns are done by the de- 
partment at its workshop on Albany street. 

At this shop there are four men permanently 
employed, and three who work at piecework on 
the painting of lanterns and repairing copper 
work. 

All the cost of men permanently employed, 
piecework, repainting lanterns, painting posts 
and brackets, carting of lanterns, oil and posts, 
stock used in repairing, horsekeeping, etc., are 
included in the item in the schedule for repairing 
lanterns. 

In addition to the lanterns repaired as above 
there have been 2650 lanterns painted, two coats, 
and 1198 iron posts repainted, one coat, during the 
year. 

The aggregate number of public lamps in the 
city of Boston is 12,415— an increase of 346 during 
the past year. 

The increase of the separate sections of the city, 
as above, has been as follows in 1879: 

City proper 40 

East Boston 1 

South Boston 23 

Roxbury 36 

Dorchester 90 

Brookline t . 

West Roxbury 73 

Charlestown 10 

Brighton 73 

Total 346 

Financial Condition of the Department. 
The balance of the appropriation on hand 
from 1878, on the 1st of January, 1879, 

was 8159,121.83 

There was expended during the remain- 
der of the finamial year 127,458.52 



The balance unexpended and trans- 
ferred to other appropriations was. 31,363,31 
The appropriation for the financial year 

ending on the 30ih of April Lext was 8*00,000.00 

Amount, expended to date 284,785.51 

Balance unexpended $115, 214.49 

an amount sufficient to meet all anticipated ex- 
penditures of the department for the remainder 
of the financial year. 

The great aggregate cost of supporting this de- 
partment is to be traced directly to annexation, 
as one-half of all the street lamps are located 
within the annexed territory, and more than one- 
hall the appropriation is expended outside the 
old city limits. 

There are at the present time over four hundred 
miles of streets and places lighted by this depart- 
ment, covering a more extended territory than 
any other similar department in the country. 

The length of streets lighted in the old city 
limits in 1867 did not exceed eighty-five miles. 

The committee of the department, consisting of 
Aldermen O'Brien, Breck and Tucker, have gen- 
erally supervised the purchases of material used 
by the department, which have been procured 
with the advantages of the largest discounts. 

They have given much time in examining loca- 
tions where lamps have been asked for, and have 
thoroughly investigated many of the claimed im- 
provements in street lighting. 

BRIDGES. 

Reports of the superintendents of bridges for 
the year 1879 were received, showing the business 
to have been as follows: 



15 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Brighton bridge, 1050 vessels; Broadway, 6553; 
Chelsea street, 19 scows; Dover street, 4880 ves- 
sels; Federal-street, 7938 vessels; Marginal-street, 
1565 vessels; Meridian-street, 3529 vessels; Mt. 
Washington-avenue. 10,398. Sent down. 

MIDLAND RAILROAD. 

A communication was received from the Board 
of Railroad Commissioners giving notice ot a 
hearing on Wednesday next on the petition of the 
Midland Railroad associates for approval of loca- 
tion of route within this city. Referred to the 
Committee on Paving. 

\ MAM'Y IN OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

A communication was received from the Over- 
seers of the Poor giving notice of a vacancy in 
that board caused by the death of William Gor- 
man on the 3d inst., whose term would have ex- 
pired April 30th next. Referred to the joint 
special committee to nominate Overseers of the 
Poor. 

FOLIC B I'll ABATABLE I'ISD. 

A communication was received from the Police 
Commissioners asking permission to use the 
police appropriation as far as is necessary to pay 
pensions during the remainder of the year, the 
same being accompanied by a statement from the 
Auditor ot Accounts to that board, showing that 
it will be necessary, and that the fund will be un- 
able to meet the' payment of the roll of retired 
policemen and pay the beneficiaries of the fund. 
Referred to the Committee on Police. Sent down. 

LOCATIONS ACCEPTED. 

Communications were received from the 
Metropolitan Railroad Company, giving notice of 
the acceptance of their sixty-sixth and sixty- 
seventh locations granted by this Board, Dec. 22, 
1879. Placed on file. 

com Mini E OB LGCOUD TO. 

Notice was received from the Committee on 
Accounts of their organization by the choice of 
Alderman Tucker as chairman on the part, of the 
Board, John A . Kidney as chairman on the part 
of the Common Council, and John Taylor as clerk 
of the committee, sent down. 

STATE AID. 

The quarterly report of the Paymaster of state 
Aid was received and Benl down. Balance last 
report, *441; received since, $22,941 ; paid, $21,794; 
balance on hand, si 147. 

FIRES \ NO LLARMS. 

The report of the Fire Commissioners on the 

tires and alarms tor December, l sti», was received 
and sent down*. 

\SMn| \ \ : ,11 >, ( i.ikk. 
A communication was received from the City 
clerk nominating John T. rriest for Assistant 
City Clerk. Confirmed. 

- 1 \ I'IKS OF WINTHBXHP AND AD VMS, 

Aldenu.m Klynn offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor, with three 
members <>f this Board, be a special committee to 
take charge <if the erection of the statues of 

John YVinthrop and Samuel Adams, as authorized 

by orders of the Board of Aldermen passed Sept. 
2, 1879, and Oct. 21, L87». 

Passed, and on motion of Alderman Flynn, Al- 
dermen O'Brien, I'.reck and Whitten were ap- 
pointed said committee. 

COURTESIES TO DISTINGUISHED STRANGERS. 

Alderman Flynn offered an order— That his 
Honor the .Mayor lie authorized to extend, in be- 
half of the City Council, such civilities to distin- 
guished strangers who may visit the city daring 
the present year as may appear to he courteous 
and appropriate; the expense to be charged to 
the appropriation for Incidentals. Passed — yeas 
12, nays 0. sent down. 

FAN i:i II. HALL. 

Alderman Flynn presented a petition from P. 
A. Collins and others, for the use of Faneuil Hall 
for a public meeting at 11 A. M. tomorrow. On 
motion ot Alderman Flynn the petition was 
granted. 

NEW COURT HOUSE. 

Alderman Fh an presented the petition of Hen- 
ry W. Paine and many other members of the Suf- 
folk Bar, representing that there is an imperative 
necessity for improved accommodations for the 
courts aiid administration of justice In this coun- 
ty, and praying the Board to take such action as 
may be necessary. On motion of Alderman Klynn 
the petition was referred to a special committee 
of five, with instructions to give the petitioners a 
hearing. Aldermen Flynn, Slade, Breck, Caton 
and Walhridge were appointed said committee. 
LICENSING OF MINORS. 

Alderoian Flynn offered an order— That the 
Board of Aldermen be and they are hereby author- 



ized, in accordance with section 14, chapter 50, of 
the General Statutes, to make rules and regula- 
tions to restrain sales by minors, or to grant 
licenses for minors and to make such sales on 
such terms and conditions as they shall prescribe. 
Passed. Sent down. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS OF THE HOARD. 

Alderman Woolley offered an order— That the 
several standing committees of this Board resume 
the unfinished business of 1879, which is appro- 
priate to said committees. Passed. 

REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS. 

Alderman Viles offered an order— That the sev- 
eral boards, directors and heads of departments 
of the City Government he requested to submit 
their annual reports in print. Passed. Sent down. 
STREET AND health DEPARTMENTS. 

Alderman Breck offered the following i 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to ascertain and report the number of 
miles of streets in New York, Philadelphia and 
Baltimore, the cost of maintaining and repairing 
the same, and how much, if any, of the expense 
is paid by the abutters 

Ordered, That the S*ipenntendent of Health be 
directed to ascertain and report the cost of per- 
forming in New York, Philadelphia and Balti- 
more the duties which are performed in this city 
by the Health Department. 

Passed. 

INSPECTORS OF PRISONS. 

Alderman Slade offered an order— That a spe- 
cial committee he appointed to inspect the pris- 
ons and houses of detention within the county of 
Suffolk, and to make the examinations and re- 
ports required by the statutes of the Common- 
wealth ot Massachusetts. Passed, and Aldermen 
Slade, Breck and Whitten were appointed said 
committee. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Alderman Slade presented communications 
from the Fire Commissioners, requesting ner- 
inis-ion to maintain telegraph wires for nre- 
alarui purposes and to facilitate business, and of- 
fered the following orders : 

Ordered, That permission be granted the Board 
Of Fire Commissioners to erect and maintain 
until otherwise ordered by this Board, one fire- 
alarm telegraph pole upon Alpine street, at such 
point as is indicated by a red dot upon a plan 
furnished by the City Surveyor and herewith ap- 
pended. Passed. 

Ordered, That permission be granted the Board 
of Fire Commissioners to erect and maintain 
until otherwise ordered by this Board, three tele- 
graph poles on Marlborough street and two poles 
on West Chester park, for the purpose of the ex- 
tension of the fire-alarm telegraph to the corner 
of Beacon street and Westchester park; the loca- 
tion of said poles to be at such points as are indi- 
cated by red dots upon a plan furnished by the 
City Surveyor and herewith appended. Passed. 

Alderman Slade stated that under ordinary cir- 
cumstances it would be proper to send these mat- 
ters to the Committee on Pavin r. But the plans 
have been made and referred to the Superin- 
tendent of Streets, who approves them, and the 
Fire Department are very much in a hurry to set 
the poles. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN ANTE-ROOM. 

Alderman Yiles offered the following: 

Ordered— That the ante-room of the aldermanic 
chamber be reserved for the exclusive use of the 
Mayor and the members of the Board of Alder- 
men, and that no other persons be permitted to 
enter said ante-room excepting on official busi- 
ness or by invitation of a member of this Board. 

Alderman Viles — I offer that order by the unan- 
imous wish of the Committee on Rules and Orders 
of this Board. Members of last year will remem- 
ber that the Committee on Public Buildings had 
under consideration the giving of the Aldermen 
a part of the City Clerk's room for the purpose of 
private consultation. But we believe the passage 
of this order will be sufficient to give the mem- 
bers of the Board all the room that is necessary. 

Alderman Woolley— I move to amend so as to 
include the reporters, if there is no objection. 

Alderman Viles— I believe the reporters have a 
right to come into this room at almost any and 
all times. Any person oan come in by permission 
of a member of this Board. 

On motion of Alderman Woolley the order was 
amended by inserting "and reporters" after 
"Board of Aldermen," and as amended the order 
was passed. 

Adjourned on motion of Alderman Viles. 



16 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 15, 1880. 



Regular meeting at 7y 2 P. M., Harvey X. Shep- 
ard, President, in the chair. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Reports of city officers. Placed on file. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Reference to the Committee on Police of a com- 
munication from the Police Commissioners re- 
specting the inadequacy of the income of the Po- 
lice Charitable Fund to meet pensions, etc. Con- 
curred. 

Relerence to the Committee on the Overseers of 
the Poor of a communication from said Overseers 
respecting the death of William Gorman, a mem- 
ber of the Hoard. Concurred. 

Reference to a Joint Special Committee of a mes- 
sage of the Mayor, transmitting a communication 
from the Lord Mayor of London, in regard to an 
International Memorial to commemorate the in- 
troduction of cheap postage. Concurred, and 
Messrs. Uollis of Ward 25, Sweetserof Ward 3 and 
Viles of Ward 8 were joined to the committee. 

Mayor's message appointing Frederick E. Good- 
rich as Mayor's Clerk. Placed on file. 

Order that the annual reports be submitted in 
print. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for the Mayor to extend hospitalities to 
distinguished visitors to the city during the pres- 
ent year. Read twice, under a suspension of the 
rule, on motion of Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12, and 
passed in concurrence — yes 64, nays 0. A motion 
to reconsider by Mr. Whitmore, hoping it would 
not prevail, was lost. 

LICENSING OF MINORS. 

An order came down for the Board of Aldermen 
to make rules and regulations restraining the 
sales by minors, and to grant licenses for such 
sales. 

Mr. Whitmore— I wish to ask why we should 
pass any order in the matter. The Board of 
Aldermen, with the concurrence of the Mayor, 
have the right to make such rules, and I should 
like to know in what respect we are called upon 
to pass anything about it. I ask the question be- 
cause orders were introduced last year, and re- 
ferred to the Committee on Ordinances, when *"e 
had no right to take any action in the matter. 
There atfe provisions in the bound volumes re- 
lating to various matters, which are called the 
rules of the Board of Aldermen, and I should 
like to ask what concurrent action is needed in 
this matter. 

Mr. Parkman of Ward 9—1 would refer the gen- 
tleman to chapter 15 of the General Statutes, as- 
printed on page 257, in which it says the City 
Council of any city, and the inhabitants of any 
town, may authorize the Mayor and Aldermen or 
the Selectmen to restrain sales by minors. I 
think we have no authority to make rules, but we 
can authorize the Board of Aldermen to make 
them, and without the concurrence of this branch 
the Board of Aldermen do not have the power to 
make such rules. 

Mr. Whitmore— I am entirely satisfied. I rose 
to make the inquiry because the matter came be- 
fore us without any explanation. Such mistakes 
have been made before. I am obliged to the gen- 
tleman for the information. 

The order was passed in concurrence. 

STREET AND HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. 

An order came down for the Superintendent of 
Streets to ascertain the number of miles of streets 
in New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore, the 
cost of repairing and maintaining the same, and 
how much of the expense is paid by abutters. 

Mr. Whitmore— I would suggest as an amend- 
ment to the order that the inquiry also cover the 
question what proportion of the expense is 
paid by the horse railroads or other parties. That 
can be ascertained at the same time without any 
more trouble, and 1 presume in Mew York city, as 
in Boston, some portion is paid by the abutters, 
and some by the horse railroad companies which 
have tracks in the streets. I move that that item 
be added. 

The President— Will the gentleman reduce his 
amendment to writing ? ' 



Mr. Healy— I move to amend the order by insert- 
ing after "ascertained" the words "by written 
communications addressed to the proper offi- 
cials." 

Mr. Whitmore offered his amendment in writ- 
ing, as follows: Insert after the words "Row 
much of the expense is paid by the abutters" the 
words "by the horse railroads using the streets, 
or other parties." 

Mr. Whitmore's amendment was adopted. The 
question then came upon the adoption of the 
amendment of Mr. Healy. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4 — I would suggest that I 
don't think it is hardly worthy the dignity of this 
body to limit the inquiry in that way. There may 
be in this citv today the Superintendent of Streets 
of Philadelphia, and that order will prevent the 
Superintendent of Streets of Boston from taking 
him into consultation. He will be obliged to go 
strictly in accordance with the order. It seems to 
me it is limiting the Superintendent to a certain 
way of getting information, which it seems to me 
the members of this board hardly desire to do. 

Mr. Swift of ^f ard 9— It seems to me if any of 
those officers were in the city, this being a formal 
matter, it would nevertheless be proper to ad- 
dress them by letter and have their answers in 
writing. Sol don't see that it will be improper 
in any way. I think we had better adopt the 
amendment so as to avoid any doubt about it. 

Mr. Bailey— It involves an appropriation of 
money, for it will require an expendture for post- 
age stamps, and the use of stationery. 

Mr. O'Dowd of Ward 6— Some time ago the 
Superintendent ot Lamps was instructed to pro- 
cure information of the cost of lighting the 
streets of various cities, and he received commu- 
nications from all the principal cities but one. 
They were satisfactory, and were very explicit in- 
deed, and being in writing, were more authentic 
and official than if they had been given by the 
voice. 

Mr. Swift— As to the objection being made that 
an appropriation will be necessary for writing 
materials and postage stamps, those will come 
under the general appropriation provided for the 
department and not require anything additional. 

The amendment of Mr. Healy was adopted, and 
the order as amended was read a second time and 
passed. 

An order came down for the Superintendent of 
Health to ascertain the cost of performing the 
duties »f the Health Department in the above- 
named cities. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 moved to amend by sub- 
stituting "Board of Health" for Superintendent 
of Health, stating that the Superintendent was 
subject to the board and appointed by them. 

Mr. Christal of Ward 8 moved to amend by in- 
serting "by written communications addressed to 
the proper officials," as in the previous order. 

The amendments of both Mr. Sawyer and Mr. 
Christal were adopted, and the order as amended 
was read a second time and passed. 

Severally sent »p. 

THE OLD STATE HOUSE. 

Under the head of unfinished business the 
Council consideied the order to petition the 
Legislature for an act to prevent the City Gov- 
ernment from selling, removing or altering the 
external appearance ot the Old State House. 

Mr. Whitmore— As I offered this order at the 
last meeting, I desire to give the Council some 
reasons for so doing. In 1876 there was a very de- 
termined effort made to pull down the Old State 
House. It being city property, and leased to va- 
rious parties, and the leases expiring in that 
year, a very determined effort was made by cer- 
tain parties in the neighborhood to have the 
building torn down. The pretext was that a 
street widening was necessary to connect with 
Devonshire street — at all events, it was at- 
tempted to cut off one half of it— but 
public indignation was aroused, and the 
old building was preserved in its present 
condition. The porch was removed, and that was 
found to subserve public convenience, and the 
building was left. The disposal of the building 
will come up next year. In 1881 these leases win 
expire, and in view of that fact, and of the public 
uses to which the building might be put. I thought 
it desirable that this building, the only one of 
historical interest which remains in the posses- 
sion ol the city, except one, should be put beyond 
the control of any one City Government to re- 
move or alter it. The city charter expressly pro- 
vides that the Common and Faneuil Hall cannot 



JANUARY 15 



1880 



17 



be alienated from the people. The Old State 
House, it seems to me, should be in the same con- 
dition. You understand that if the Legislature 
passes such an act, any succeeding Legislature 
can repeal it, but it will put it out of the power of 
any one City Government to destroy it. I cannot 
conceive of any emergency which would require 
any City Government to remove or alter it. Not- 
withstanding, I am disinclined to invoke legisla- 
tive interposition in our affairs, yet for the rea- 
sons I have offered I have presented this order, 
and can see no objection to it. 

Mr. Greenough of Ward 9—1 should like to ask 
the gentleman whether he will accept as an 
amendment, "Without first obtaining the consent 
of the citizens of Boston by yea and nay ballot." 

Mr. Whitmore — I will accept the amendment, 
for I think we should be much more apt to get it 
from the Legislature than the people. I will ac- 
cept the amendment. 

Mr. Greenough— Then I will offer that amend- 
ment. As the gentleman will remember, when I 
offered a similar amendment to the order in rela- 
tion to the burial grounds, in his speech he said 
it was unfair to bind one City Government for all 
succeeding time, and that the city should have 
the right, if it saw fit, to use any of its grounds 
as it chose. The amendment is a proper 
one I think, for we should not alienate that 
building forever, though I do not think one City 
Government should have the power to remove it. 
I understand the gentleman accepts the amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Whitmore — I have no doubt the gentleman 
quoted my remarks correctly, but I cannot pre- 
tend to say now, and I don't think it is worth 
while looking up the record, as he is satisfied with 
it. I consider the citizens of Boston would be of 
but one opinion about it. The loss would be 
theirs if they destroyed that relic of the past. I 
am willing to accept the amendment as it is 
offered. 

Mr. Swift of Ward 9 — While I can see no neces- 
sity or immediate prospect of this building being 
disturbed in any way, it seems to me it is hardly 
a matter of such great importance that it is worth 
while to petition the Legislature about it. It has 
been materially changed already. It has not the 
character of an old building. It has a modern 
French roof upon it, and as I don't see any imme- 
diate prospect of its being removed or attacked, 
still I don't see why we should not trust this mat- 
ter to the City Government. But as the question 
has been brought up, I move that it be referred to 
the Committee on Streets. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5—1 hope the matter will 
not be referred. I agree fully with the order as 
amended and with its shape before it was amend- 
ed. In 1876 this matter seemed to be pushed very 
diligently. It was a hard matter to find who 
wanted it done. Some of the abutters near the 
building did n't care about it, and others did, but 
it was urged that the city must take away that 
building, which was earning at that time about 
$25,000 a year. But there are three considera- 
tions about this matter. The city has just three 
old landmarks left, Faneuil Hall, the Old State 
House and the Old South, and I wish the city 
owned the Old South, and if I could include the 
Old South in this order I would. But those are the 
three old landmarks of our early history. I did 
what I could to defeat the project in 1876, and am 
glad the gentleman from Ward 12 has brought 
the matter up. I hope we shall go to the Legis- 
lature, so there cannot be any hasty action on the 
part of the City Government which will 
alter or deface that building. The street 
was run into Dock square, and called New Devon- 
shire street. It was brought up with a great pres- 
sure that we must have a straight line there. 
Well, the city removed the steps from the Old 
State House, and, as my teams go through there a 

freat deal, I can say that it is no inconvenience, 
hope the order will pass, and that we shall go to 
the Legislature. 

Mr. Christal of Ward 8—1 feel it would be for 
the interest of the citizens of Boston to have the 
Old State House removed. Anybody knows it is a 
dangerous place to be passing— between the Old 
State House and Devonshire street. Why any- 
body should be anxious to retain that Old State 
House I cannot easily discover. Why not retain 
all the old relics ? Do they show any more beauty 
to the city ? It is one of the structures that the 
city ot Boston should abolish at its earliest con- 
venience. It is a disgrace to the city and an in- 
convenience to the public. I might not object to 



removing the material, but I feel it is unjust to 
allow it to remain there. 

Mr. O'Dowd of Ward 6—1 trust that this matter 
will not be referred to the Committee on Streets. 
I think the Council is almost of one opinion, and 
that is that the Old State House should be pre- 
served in its present state at least. It is no great 
credit to the city, in my opinion, that it has al- 
lowed so many changes in its external appear- 
ance; I think it would be more a credit to the city 
to have the building entirely devoted to a large 
historical collection and as a public building 
of historical interest, as Independence "Hall is 
preserved by the citizens of Philadelphia. I 
don't think it is of any great account that we 
should receive $25,000 a year from the rent. I 
think it ought to stand there without any tenants 
of any class. I would remind my friend on the 
left that he has forgotten one old land mark, and 
that is the old North Church, upon which the City 
Government put a rablet to commemorate its his- 
tory. I hope something of this kind shall be passed 
here to petition the Legislature to preserve that 
edifice in its present shape. I don't think 
there is any danger in crossing and recross- 
ing the street at that point. I am of opinion 
that the danger would be increased to have the 
building removed. Certainly pedestrians have an 
opportunity to wait on that side of the street if 
there is a blockade on the other side. I trust we 
shall have as much regard for our old landmarks 
as other cities on the eastern seaboard have had 
for theirs. In my opinion there is greater inter- 
est manifested in New York in such matters than 
there is in Boston. It seems to me Boston has 
been derelict in the matter of the Old South, and 
there should have been less scandal about its pur- 
chase and sale, and if the city had done its duty 
there would have been less discussion in the 
papers of this and other cities. 

Mr. Christal— I think it would be just as im- 
proper in the city taking the trunk of the Old 
Elm and placing it in this Council Chamber as to 
retain the Old State House. There is no differ- 
ence. I should like to have an opportunity to 
convince one or two gentlemen who like to talk to 
hear themselves talk, that there is a dangerous 
place down there, and for that purpose I should 
like to have this matter specially assigned to the 
next meeting at half -past eight, so that members 
of this Council can see what kind of a place it is. 
It is one of the narrowest places in this city where 
there is so much travel. I pass there several 
times every day and my eyes are not closed. 
Teams are blockaded there, pedestrians are near- 
ly run down, and policemen have to be stationed 
there to prevent blockades. Why not retain all 
the other old landmarks? There is just as much 
need of retaining the house of Paul Revere as in 
retaining the Old State House. 

Mr. Whitmore — I desire to answer briefly two 
points that have been made. I was afraid some 
one would say my order was unnecessary. I think 
the remarks of the gentleman from Ward 8 con- 
vince us that there is a mirority in the commu- 
nity which desires to have the building re 
moved. The old building is in danger and 
will be every year until it is put beyond 
the whim or caprice of any City Govern- 
ment. I also know that a "member of the 
Board of Aldermen has expressed the same senti- 
ments as the gentleman from Ward 8, and he did 
so to me, since this order was introduced, stating 
that the time had come for the old State House to 
be destroyed. He made that statement to me 
after I introduced this order, and I commit no 
breach of confidence by making the statement. 
In the second place, the remark has been made 
that the building has been altered. Now, sir, in 
1876 Mr. George F. Loring made a copy of the 
building as it stood in 1876 and in 1776. If it were 
necessary I would ask a recess of the Council so 
that the members might look at those pictures; 
but I think it is unnecessary, as I am sure most 
of the members have seen and are familiar with 
it, as it has hung in the City Clerk's office. Any 
one who looks at these representations of the old 
State House will see that the building is substan- 
tially as it was as regards externals. The only 
change now is that the modern balconies have 
been removed. There is a French roof on 
the upper story, but viewing it from the 
side it - does not affect the general ap- 
pearance of the building which is obtained from 
State street or the other end. The spire is the 
same, the original ends are the same, the windows 
are the same, and today, any person standing in 



18 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



State street and looking at it, will get substantial- 
ly the same view of the building which he would 
have got one hundred years ago. it i.s not too lata 
to preserve the Old State House substantially as 
it lias been. It is not a case of a building which 
has been altered and changed until there is noth- 
ing materially left of.the old building about it. I 
object to the reference of this matter to the Com- 
mittee on Streets, because there seems to be no 
need of so referring it, as it is a matter upon 
which every member of the Council has probably 
made up his mind. The Legislature's in session, 
and the time for presenting petitions and papers 
will close very soon. If we send this matter to a 
committee and wait for a report, and in other 
ways allow the matter to be delayed, we will be 
shutout. I hope my friend from Ward n will not 
insist upon the motion to refer. 

The motion to refer to the Committee on Streets 
was lost. 

The question then came np on giving the order, 
as amended, a second reading. 

Mr. Christal of Ward 8 moved to specially as- 
sign to the next meeting at half-past eight 
o'clock, in order that gentlemen may have an op- 
portunity of viewing the Old State House and 
surroundings. Lost. 

Upon the suggestion <>i Mr. Lauter the order 
was amended by Mr. Whitmore so that the peti- 
tion should be presented to the present session of 
the Legislature, instead of the next one. 

Mr. Pratt pf Ward 21— I don't wish to suggest 
an amendment) but I would inquire the necessity 
for inserting the words, "materially change the 
external appearance." 11 l had thought there 
was any prospect of referring the order to the 
committee, I would like to have inserted that they 
be instructed to consider the expediency of 
restoring it to its former appearance. I should like 
to see 11 in its appearance ol a hundred years ago. 
l should like to see the external appearance of 
the Old State House just as it was then. If it 
were in that condition we should have more re- 
spect and reverence for it than we have now, the 
same as Pluiadelphians have tor Independi nee 
Hall. Then when .you go there you would have 
the assurance that yon were treading the same 
floors and sitting in the same chairs that the 
fathers used. It has been tinned into a den of 
thieves. It is made into offices, and there is 
scarcely a vestige of what it was. I think there 
may be" a desire to return the building to its 
original form and otherwise improve it. Under 
the present form of the order there would be a 
doubt in my mind whether necessary repairs 
Could he made. 

Mr. Whitmore— The gentleman having asked 
for information, I must beg the indulgence of the 
Council for again speaking upon the question. 
The reason 1 put the words "external appear- 
ance" in the order was for the reason be has 
given. Ire interior has been changed and mate- 
rially altered. But the exterior is substantially 
the same as it was before. 1 think if there are 
any material suggestions to make, the time to do 
BO is when the (ity Solicitor, under 'he advice of 
the Committee on Legislative Matters, comes to 
prepare a bill and sends it to the State House. 
This 01 der is drawn in a broad form, and the de- 
tails can be put in when the act is drawn. If the 
gentleman desires to save the building he should 
not be too precise about the details ol trie order. 
I think it will be looked after by the representa- 
tives ot the city at the State House. 

The order was declared passed. Mr. Bailey of 
"Ward 4 doubted the vote, and the Council was 
divided. 

The President appointed the following-named 
gentlemen permanent tellers: 

First Division— Messrs. Whitmore of Ward 12, 
Morrison ol Ward 17. 

Second Division— Messrs. Perkins of Ward 17, 
Sweeney, Jr.. of W ard 2. 

'ibird Division— Messrs. Hrintnall of AVard 3, 
Hollis of Ward 25. 

The 01 der was passed— 40 for, 10 against. 

A motion to reconsider, by Mr. Whitmore, 
hoping it would not prevail, was lost. Sent up. 
mi;i, a M/.A 1 ion "i FINANCE COMMITTEE, 

A communication was received from the Finance 
Committee uivinji notice of their organization, as 
follows: Chairman ex officio — Mayor Frederick O. 
Prince; Chairman on the part "of the Common 
Council— Henry F. Coe; Clerk— Alfred T.Turner. 
Sent up. 

DECORATION DAY. 

A communication was received from the Mayor 



transmitting an invitation from Thomas G. Ste 
venson Post 20, (i. A. K., for the attendance of the 
Mayor and City Council at the memorial services 
of the post at Forest Hills on Decoration Day, 
May 30th, next. Accepted. Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

By Mr. Wheeler of AVard 10- Petition of Edwin 
Tufts for confirmatory deed of land on Brookline 
avenue. Referred to Joint Committee on Public 
Lands. Sent up. 

Hy Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10— Petition of Cathe- 
rine Cronin to be compensated for personal inju- 
ries caused by an alleged defect on Hanover 
street, near Portland street, Jan. 4, 1880. Re- 
ferred to Joint Committee on Claims. Sent up. 

MANAC.KKS OF THE OLD SOUTH ASSOCIATION. 

Mr. Swift of Ward 9 submitted a report from 
the joint special committee to nominate mana- 
gers of the Old South Association, recommending 
the election of Hugh O'Brien on the part of the 
Board of Aldermen and Harvey N. Shepard on 
the part of the Common Council. Accepted. 

On motion of Mr. Swift the rule was suspended 
and an election ordered. 

Committee — Messrs. Swift of Ward 9, Hancock 
of Ward 1, Folan of Ward 18. 

On motion of Mr. Christal of Ward 8, a recess 
of five minutes was taken while the committee 
were out. 

Whole number of votes 67 

Necessary for a choice 34 

Hugh O'Hrien had 07 

Harvey N. Shepard 65 

.James Christal 1 

Timothy Murphy 1 

Messrs. O'Brien and Shepard were elected. 
Sent up. 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY HOSPITAL. 

Mr. Taylor of Ward 10 submitted a report in 
part from the joint special committee to nomi- 
nate trustees of the City Hospital, recommending 
the election of Alderman Joseph A. Tucker and 
Councilman John P. Hilton and George H. Wy- 
man. 

The report was accepted, and Mr. Taylor moved 
a suspension of the rule, that the Council might 
proceed to an election. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 hoped the rule would not 
be suspended, and that the nominations would lie 
over a week. Mr. Taylor withdrew the motion to 
suspend the rule. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 submitted the following: 

The Special Committee on Joint Rules and Or- 
ders, to whom were referred certain proposed 
amendments to the Rules and Orders, having 
given the matter their consideration, would re- 
spectfully report that in their opinion it is inex- 
pedient to adopt the amendment as proposed. 

The question was upon accepting the report and 
adopting the recommendations of the committee. 

Mr. W hitmore— I ask for a division of the ques- 
tion. There is a custom which has grown up in 
the Council of combining the acceptance of a re- 
port with the adoption ot the recommendations 
of the committee. It seems to me it is better that 
we should fall back upon another custom, of ac- 
cepting the report, but not thereby adopting the 
recommendation. As a matter ol courtesy, 1 hold 
that the report of every committee should be ac- 
cepted, and then if any debate happens it shall 
be upon the recommendations of the committee. 

The President— The Chair is of opinion that an 
acceptance of the report of a committee which is 
not offered in the form of an order, resolve or or- 
dinance, adopts that report. But still the Chair 
does not desire that any order shall be passed or 
any report accepted unless it is the intention of 
the members at the time to adopt it as 
their opinion, and therefore he will put the ques- 
tion first upon the acceptance and then upon the 
adoption of the report. The Chair is still of the 
opinion that, as a matter of parliamentary prac- 
tice, the acceptance of the report adopts it. 

The report was accepted, and the question came 
upon the adoption of the recommendations of the 
committee. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12—1 don't intend to 
take up the time of this Council in any lengthy 
discussion of the report of the committee, but I 
do desire that this committee shall make some 
explanation of the reasons why they make this 
report. Owing to the form in wnich this matter 
has been brought before the Council, and the 
peculiar objections which have been made to these 
proceedings, there is no proper copy of the pro- 



J AN U ARY 15 



1880 



19 



posed amendments. If the members wish to see 
them, they have got to hunt them up in the small 
print of the proceedings. I think an injustice 
was done to me in that respect, and the Council 
should have had a chance to see the amend- 
ments in print. At all events, I want to 
know from the committee how they can get 
away from the plain duty of the Common Council 
to put its rules in proper shape and in plain Eng- 
lish ? I made a statement it the last meeting that 
one of the joint rules had a clause in it which did 
not have the meaning its frainers probably in- 
tended. I wish the committee to explain their 
very remarkable report, and state why they favor- 
ed the continuance of a rule which does not com- 
ply with the customs of the Council and the dic- 
tates of common sense. In the second place, in 
regard to the rule that no contract shall be made 
for supplies or materials beyond the current year, 
I ask some reason why they object to that rule. 
It may be a bad rule, but I want to know the rea- 
son. It does seem to me that under the rules of 
the past year any contract might be made for any 
amount, and I should think this Council would 
not care to continue a system laying the city open 
■to abuse. I am not going to argue in favor of 
these riles, but only ask the committee the rea- 
sons why they propose to reject them. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 — In regard to the gravel 
transaction to which the gentleman alludes as 
taking place last year, that committee did not go 
on and contract; they came here and asked au- 
thority to do it, which was voted down. I sup- 
pose it was u-ader this very identical rule, and be- 
cause of it, that they did come here. The gentle- 
man proposed to alter the twelfth line, requiring 
that whenever any additional expenditure not con- 
templated when the estimates are made is pro- 
posed, the board or committee shall furnish to the 
City Council a detailed account of its expenditures 
in print. The committee failed to see where any- 
thing more was needed as an amendment to that 
rule. It is conclusive and comprehensive. Noth- 
ing can be more so than that sixteenth rule of the 
Joint Rules and Orders. This matter has been over 
very carefully, as I said the other evening, by a 
joint committee who are supposed to possess a 
fair amount of legal knowledge, and it is their 
work. Other committees of previous years have 
done the same. We might talk upon this matter 
half an hour and the conclusions of the commit- 
tee are the best we can get. The President has 
before him the proposed amendments to the 
rule«, but I will not call for them. 

The report of the committee was adopted. 
Sent up. 

The President— In order that the practice may 
be uniform hereafter, unless the Chair is over- 
ruled by an appeal, he will rule that if a commit- 
tee do not report an order, the acceptance of the 
report of the committee will be the adoption of 
any recommendations of the report. 

EXPENDITURES FOE SCHOOLS. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 submitted the following: 
The Committee on Public Instruction, to whom 
was referred the request of the School Committee 
for an additional appropriation of $1 18,133, to 
meet the regular expenses of the public schools 
■during the remainder of the present financial 
year, beg leave to report that they have conferred 
upon the subject with the Committee on Accounts 
of the School Committee, and find the condition 
of the school finances to be as represented in the 
communication to the City Council. It appears that 
■the estimates for carrying on the schools during 
the present financial year were carefully prepared 
by the School Committee last spring, and the sala 
ries of officers and instructors having been estab- 
lished, and contracts virtually entered into, upon 
the basis of those estimates, the School Commit- 
tee felt that in good faith no material re- 
ductions could afterwards be made, and the 
schools have, in fact, been administered thus 
far upon the scale of expense contem- 
plated in the original estimates. The City 
Council having reduced the appropriation, the 
School Committee now find themselves without 
funds, and unless an additional appropriation is 
supplied them, equal to the amount of the reduc- 
tion, it will be necessary to close the schools next 
month. Your committee do not consider it ad- 
visable to resort to such an extreme measure, and 
would accordingly respectfully recommend an 
additional appropriation of $118,133 for public 
schools, and that the Committee on Finance be 
requested to proviae the means. 
The question was upon accepting the report and 



referring the subject to the Finance Committee' 
with a request to provide the means. 

Mr. Coe — Whatever difference of opinion there 
may be as to the course of the School Board in 
this matter, we are brought face to face with the 
fact that if this money is not appropriated for 
their purposes, the schools will be closed on the 
20th of February, and cannot be opened until 
some time after that, when the new appropria- 
tions are available. As stated in that report, the 
committee do not think we ought to go to that ex- 
treme. With regard to the relations of the School 
Board, we shall report further. The committee 
recommend, as stated in this report, that the re- 
quest be granted, and the subject be referred to 
the Finance Committee. 

Mr. Whitmore — Do I understand this is but a 
partial report on the subject ? 

Mr. Coe— There is another report. 

The report was accepted and referred to the 
Finance Committee to provide the means. Sent 
up. 

Mr. Coe moved a reconsideration, hoping it 
would not prevail. Lost. Sent up. 

PROPOSED LIMITATION OF THE POWERS OF THE 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 submitted the following : 
The Committee on Public Instruction, who were 
directed to consider whether any additional legis- 
lation is necessary as to the relations between the 
City Council and the School Committee, would re- 
spectfully report that, having carefully considered 
the subject, they are of the opinion that the City 
Council should have the right to limit the amount 
which may be expended for school purposes, 
in like manner as it limits the expendi- 
tures of all the other branches of the City 
Government. In other words, the relations be- 
tween the City Council and School Committee 
should be so adjusted as to compel the latter to 
confine its expenditures within the limits of the 
appropriation furnished for school purposes. A 
measure has been introduced in the State Senate 
which is intended to accomplish substantially 
the changes suggested by this committee, and 
they believe that the influence of the City Council 
should be exerted in its favor. They would, 
accordingly, recommend the passage of the ac- 
companying order: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to petition the Legislature at its present session 
for the passage of an act requiring the School 
Committee of Boston to confine its expenditures 
for carrying on the public schools within the 
limits of the appropriation furnished for the pur- 
pose by the City Council. 

The question was upon giving the order a sec- 
ond reading. 

Mr. Coe— There are a few facts and figures 
which I wish to present to the Council here, 
which I think will justify us in the passage of the 
order. I have been looking over the figures with 
some interest as to the cost of our schools in the 
last few years, and I ask the particular attention 
of the Council to them. For the year ending- 
April 30, 1879, which is the last financial year, the 
total cost of school expenses, excluding new 
school houses, was $1,519,000. There were 53,202 
scholars, including 3562 in the evening schools. 
For the financial year 1853-54 the Cust of school 
expenses was $252,000, and there were 22,528 schol- 
ars. If the cost for 1878-79 had been the same for 
each scholar as in 1853-54, the schools would have 
cost $598,000 instead of $1,519,000, or $921,000 less. 
This amount, if saved, would have reduced the 
tax rate very nearly a dollar and a half on a thou- 
sand, and taken nearly one-eighth off every man's 
tax bill. In other words, while the scholars have 
increased 137 percent., the amount of expense 
annually has increased 500 per cent. If it is 
said that 1854 is going back too far, we will come 
forward ten years, to the financial year 1863-04, 
which gentlemen will remember was about the 
time gold was bearing its highest premium, when 
all the costs of living" were high. Take 1864 — the 
number of scholars was 26,901, and the cost of the 
schools was $ 405,000. If the cost per scholar had 
been the same in 1879 as in 1S04, the School Board 
would have spent $919,000, instead of $1,519,000. 
This basis of expenditures would have saved the 
taxpayers $600,000, or nearly one dollar on a thou- 
sand. So that from 1804, the number of scholars 
has increased 100 per cent., and the expenditures 
for schools 237 per cent. It is true that the board 
made some saving within the last two or three 
years. They have reduced the cost per scholar 
within the last two or three years, making some 



20 



COMMON COUNCIL 



considerable saving. But they have evidently 
come to the conclusion that they have gone as far 
as they can, lor their estimates, as submit- 
ted this year, 1879-80, exceeded the expenditures 
of the previous year about sm.ooo. it has been 
stated that they have made two reductions of sal- 
aries of instructors. They have, 1 believe, made 
reductions at two different times, but when gen- 
tlemen come to look into the matter, they will 
rind that the reductions have been very slight. 
They bare adopted a sliding scale of salaries, so 
that when a teacher enters upon his duties he re- 
ceives less salary, but there is a gradual increase 
lor five years. Looking at the salaries paid now 
to instructors in the fourth grade, the highest 
amount ever paid lor that grade of teachers was 
$750. The amount paid this year to that grade of 
teachers — those who have been connected with 
the school five years— is >744, and the amount paid 
those teachers' aggregates nearly one-half the 
whole amount paid to the instructors. So there 
has been a reduction ol less than one per cent, on 
Salaries in that Case. Take the highest grade of 
masters, audi think the reduction has been five per 
cent. While the Council has gone on and reduced 
the salaiies in the different departments connect- 
ed with City Hall all the way troiu fifteen to 
in many cases twenty and twenty-five per cent., 
the expenditures in" the School' Department re- 
main as they have been, within a very small per- 
centage, l 'tint! in these figures a justification for 
the report of the committee and their recom- 
mendations, if hereafter we can jget an act 
pasM'U bj the Legislature that the expenditures 
of the School Board shall be placed upon the same 
looting as other departments, and that they shall 
be limited the same as all other branches, it 
will be a great point gained. At the 
same time 1 am not attacking the School Hoard, 
but simply Stating facts, so that gentlemen can 

themselves judge ol the necessity tor passing 
this order, i am aware that since 1854 there has 
been a tan asein what we might call the 

fancy studies pursued in the schools. They have 
taught drawing, music, cnemistry and all these 
Various studio connected with the higher 
branches, and these have swelled tne expenses in- 
curred by the School Hoard. 1 am very doubtful 
as to whether we should go on in this direction. 
I don't know that I have any turther remarks to 
make in this connection. It has been the di 
that this matter should go over for a week, and I 
have no objection. 1 move that it be specially as- 
d to the next meeting, if there is no objec- 
tion. 

Hr.Wbitmore— I entirely agree w ith the general 
principle ol the report ol "the committee that the 
present state of this complication is not to he 
longer endured. It is exactly the matter which 1 
pointed out last year— that we had got to a com- 
plication which must be solved in some way or 
other. Now, there are two ways to get rid ot this 
matter: either we can let the School Committee 
spend its own money and call upon the citizen- to 
paj the bills, or we must have power to lix the 
amount which they shall spend every year. 1 am 
not yet convinced which course will prove the 
most satisfactory in the end. In the Common 

Council we must ConfeS8 that, the School Board 

has the confidence of the community to a consid- 
erable extent, and it may he difficult to reduce the 
[lowers that they have held so long, and render 
them subordinate to the City Council. For 
that reason, as a matter ol expediency, I should 
favor petitioning lor an alternative — either that 
the School Hoard shall be kept within the ap- 
propriation passed by the City Council, or ( Ise 
that the school Committee shall, make its own 
estimates, and that a special school tax be raised, 
the same as the county tax, so that the School 
Committee shall be responsible directly to the 
people. It there is any possibility that a post- 
ponement would injure the present measure, I 
should not urge it; but if there be no Immediate 
necessity of bringing the subject to the notice of 
tne Legislature, 1 would like to have the matter 
go over for a week, in order to consider whether 
it is best to present an alternative proposition for 
one ot these two things, my desire being to arrive 
at the same end which the committee themselves 
wish to accomplish, this question being simply a 
matter of expediency aS to the form ot the order 
for petition. If 1 thought it would endanger the 
petition, I would not ask tor a postponement for 
a moment. If these is no necessity tor acting 
upon it, I would move that it be specially as- 
signed to the next meeting at half-past eight 
o'clock. 



Mr. Coe— I have no objection to the assignment- 
The motion to assign prevailed. 

THE PROr-OSED TRANSFER OF POWERS TO THE 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 submitted the following: 
The Committee on Public Instruction, to whom 
was referred the order in relation to applying for 
the passage of a law transferring to the School 
Committee of Boston the charge of all expendi- 
tures connected with the public schools, and di- 
recting the assessment and collection of a sepa- 
rate tax for school purposes, having considered 
the subject, beg leave to report that in their 
opinion the order ought not to pass. 

On motion of Mr. Coe, the report was specially 
assigned to the next meeting at half-past eight 
o'clock, to be considered in connection with tne 
other report. 

PROTECTION OF CEMETERIES. 

Mr. Greenough of Ward 9 offered the following: 

Whereas, The Massachusetts Historical Society 
has given notice of intention to petition the 
Legislature to take such action as shall secure the 
preservation of the ancient burial grounds of the 
Commonwealth; Ordered, That the Committee on 
Legislative Matters be instructed to consider the 
subject and to report at an early meeting of the 
Council what action, if any, is advisable on the 
part of the city of Boston. 

Mr. Greenough — I do not suppose there will be 
any opposition to the reference of this order to 
the Committee on Legislative Matters, because 
whatever course they may see fit to recommend 
when they make their report, it wib, of course, 
be optional with the Council to adopt it. 
But in ottering the order, I will simply accompany 
it by a statement of inv reasons for so doing. The 
Massachusetts Historical Society, which stands 
as high as any other society of the kind in the 
country, have presented a petition to the Legisla- 
ture for the piotec'ion of the burial grounds of 
the Commonwealth, naming several of them. 
They have entrusted the matter to very competent 
counsel, who will see to its consideration before 
the Legislature. Just what they will recommend 
and just how it affects the interests of the city 
and in what way we -hould cooperate with them 
the committee can ascertain. My own feeling 
about the matter is that we should act in <v sim- 
ilar way as in the motion passed in regard 
to the Old State House; that it should be put out 
of the power of any City Government to desecrate 
those bnrial grounds, and that such action should 
be taken only by ballot of the citizens. But this 
whole matter will come up tor action when the 
committee make their report. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 

Mr. Whitmore moved a reconsideration, hoping 
ti would not prevail. Lost. Sent up. 

STREET CRO.SM N(.-. 

Mr. Maguire of Ward 19 offered an order— That 
the Board ot Health be requested to cause the 
street crossings to be cleaned when they require 
it, after snowy or rainy weather, or during a thaw, 
so that the\ may be passable for pedestrians. 

Mr. (. i cenough of Ward 9— If the crossings are 
shovelled, 1 would ask if it would not spoil the 
sleighing. 

Mr. Maguire— We don't want to spoil the sleigh- 
ing, but the erossii gs have n't been touched this 
year, and I have been requested by several citizens 
to introduce this order and call attention to it. 

Mr. Lauten— I don't think the Board of Health 
have anything to do with 'hat. I think this is a 
matter "for the Joint Standing Committee on 
Health. 

Mr. Maguire— I understand the Board of Health 
have chaige of the Superintendent. 

The President read the ordinance, showing that 
the Superintendent of Health should make all 
necessary arrangements for cleaning the streets 
and disposing of the manure, to the satisfaction 
of the Board of Health. 

Mr. Lauten moved to amend by substituting 
Superintendent of Health for the Board of Health, 
and inserting at the end of the order the words 
"Under the direction of the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Health." 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 moved the reference of 
the order to the Joint Standing Committee on 
Health. 

Mr. Christal of Ward 8—1 was just going to re- 
mark that I thought the passage of this order 
would be doing an injustice to the Superintend- 
ent oi Streets. It is well known that the street 



J ANU AR Y 15 



1880. 



21 



crossings cannot be cleaned in a day or an hour 
after a storm. I think the Superintendent would 
see it is done as soon as possible. 

Mr. Lauten— I disagree with the gentleman who 
has last taken bis seat. 1 have myself spoken to 
the Superintendent several times, and he tells me 
he hasn't money enough, but if the committee 
order him to do it he will do it. 

Mr. Greenough — The reason I asked the ques- 
tion I did is because I thought it might be un- 
necessary to pass the order. Everybody knows 
that when the snow falls the horse railroads break 
up the streets and carry off the snow. There are 
a great many people who drive from out of town 
to do business here, and they will be greatly in- 
convenienced if the snow is entirely removed 
from the crossings. I should be sorry to do any- 
thing to cause inconvenience to these gentlemen. 

Mr. Sweetser of Ward 3 — I agree with the gen- 
tleman. I have seen the crossings entiiely free 
from snow, and it was greatly to the inconven- 
ience of teams. 

Mr. Williams of Ward 11 — I would like to sug- 
gest in this connection that it would be almost 
impossible after a heavy fall of snow to keep the 
crossings clean. Suppose a man is stationed at 
each crossing, and it is kept clean, the teams con- 
stantly passing over it bring new snow upon it. I 
don t chink it would be possible to keep them 
clean. 

Mr. Christal— It has got down to the old story 
that the teams take precedence of the pedestrians. 
As I have heard remarked by my friend from 
Ward 14, 1 have seen these crossings in very bad 
condition, but the Superintendent says he has no 
money to keep them clean. It would be an object 
to get men employed. There is no one m ire anx- 
ious to do that than I am. I should like to see 
men employed every day, engaged in such work, 
but there is not money enough, aud where is it to 
come from? If it is referred to the committee 
they will take the necessary action and see that it 
is done. 

Mr. Maguire — I have no objection to sending it 
to the committee. All I want is to have it accom- 
plished, and if it can be done more readily by ref- 
erence to the committee, I have no objection. 

The order was referred to the Joint Committee 
on Health. Sent up. 

LAMB'S MAP OF BOSTON. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12 offered an order — 
That the trustees of the Public Library be author- 
ized to issue full-sized heliotypes of Lamb's Map 
of the First Division of Lands in Boston, and 
dispose of them by sale or otherwise, as they 
deem advisable; the expense thereof not to ex- 
ceed four hundred dollars, and to be charged to 
the appropriation for Incidentals. 

Mr. Whitmore — The order will, of course, go 
over to the next meeting. I have no desire to 
press it. The fact is that the Public Library 
bought a large plan about six or eight months 
ago, which undertook to lay out the bounds of the 
original estates in Boston. It was a work pre- 
pared with a great deal of care, and was a valua- 
ble beginning. But like every beginning, it can 
be improved upon. It was suggested to me by 
sevsral of the trustees that if they could have 
several heliotypes taken, they could furnish them 
to conveyancers and antiquarians generally, who 
would assist the city by tilling up certain sections. 
It will be of assistance to the city to have some 
plan of this kind adopted. I hope it will be or- 
dered to a second reading and passed at the next 
meeting, so that gentlemen can have an opportunity 
to look into the subject. I move to charge it to in- 
cidentals because the appropriation for Public 
Library has been economical, and is so small 
that it would be unfair to charge it to that appro- 
priation. This map will be for the benefit of the 
whole city. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 — I think this is a sub- 
ject that should be considered by the committee, 
and I move that it be referred to the Committee 
on Public Library; with instructions to report at 
the next meeting. 

Carried. Sent up. 

EAST BOSTON CEMETERY. 

Mr. Lovell of Ward 1 offered an order— That the 
Board of Health be requested to consider and re- 
port to the City Council upon the expediency of 
having the cemetery in East Boston, known as 
the Fourth Section Cemetery, properly drained 
and otherwise improved, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $500. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 



PROPOSED NEW BRIDGE TO CHARLESTOWN. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4 offered an order— That a 
committee of five on the part of the Council, with 
such as the Aldermen may join, be appointed to 
consider and report upon the necessity of a new 
bridge over Charles River, between Wards 5 and 
7. Passed, and Messrs. Bailey of Ward 4, Hilton 
of Ward 5, Brintnall of Ward 3, Austin of Ward 11 
and Doherty of Ward 7 were appointed on said 
committee. Sent up. 

FIRE INVESTIGATION. 

Mr. Anthony of Ward 19 offered an order — That 
the Inspector of Buildings be directed to report 
to the City Council whether the condition of the 
buildings on Federal and Devonshire streets 
burned Dec. 28 and 29, 1879, complied at that time 
in all particulars with the requirements of the 
building laws; also whether any changes in the 
requirements of the building laws are desirable; 
also to state what, in his opinion, caused the fire 
to extend to other buildings than the one in which 
it originated. 

Mr. Whitmore— I desire to inquire whether this 
is the same order that was introduced and carried 
at the last meeting of the last Council, and whether 
it refers to the same buildings. I think we passed 
such an order at that time. 

The President— This has reference to the same 
matter; but the Fire Commissioners were in that 
case requested to make the report, and it is out of 
their jurisdiction. It should properly go before 
the Inspector of Buildings. 

The order was passed. Sent up. 

PROPOSED INCREASE IN THE PAY OF LABORERS. 

Mr. O'Dowd of Ward 6 offered an order — That 
a joint special committee be appointed to con- 
sider and report upon the matter of an increase 
in the pay of laborers employed by the various 
departments of the City Government, said sub- 
ject having been referred to this Government as 
the unfinished business of a joint special com- 
mittee of last year's Government. 

The order was passed to a second reading, and 
put upon its passage. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23— It seems to me that matter 
can be very well left where it is now, in the hands 
of the different departments. I trust we shall not 
do anything hasty in this matter, and th t the 
gentleman who oifered the order will give us some 
reasons for its passage. 

Mr. O'Dowd— An order was passed here at the 
last meeting but one of the last City Government 
that all matters of an unfinished nature in the 
hands of joint special committees should be re- 
ferred to the next City Government. As that was 
passed I supposed it would be within the prov- 
ince of the Chair to appoint a special committee 
to consider this matter. I think the matter ought 
to be brought up now and referred to a joint 
special committee, so that they may have a con- 
sultation with the heads of the departments and 
report. Of course it does not state the wages. 
We can see and hear the arguments of the various 
heads of departments and report if anything is 
necessary, or we can report that the various heads 
of departments will in their reports make pro- 
visions for an increase. I think it will not inter- 
fere with the duties of the various heads of de- 
partments, and consultation with them will cer- 
tainly do no harm either to the laborers or the 
City Government. 

Mr. Greenough of Ward 9 — The order of which 
this is a copy was introduced in the last session 
of the Government so suspiciously near the elec- 
tion that it seemed as if it could hardly be a coin- 
cidence. The matter was referred "to a joint 
special committee, of which I happened to be a 
member, and then, after election time, it was 
summarily dropped, the committee not being 
called together. I have no desire to shirk any 
duty of serving 'upon that committee if you ap- 
point me, but I hope this matter will be left to 
the heads of departments. 

Mr. Christal of Ward 8— I had the honor to be 
appointed upon that committee, and I wish to 
state in behalf of the Alderman, that there were 
so many petitions for a recount of votes, and as 
he served upon that committee also, he forgot 
this matter. There were so many members of the 
committee who did not come back to this Govern- 
ment that I intended to ask to have it brought 
up again. Now is the time to consider 
it. When the appropriations are made, 
we will be told that the appropriations have 
been made and we must stand by them. We 
have been asked tonight to make an approprla- 



22 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



tion for the school teachers who work so much 
harder than the poor laborers, as everybody 
knows. I have no confidence in the gentlemen 
who nave charge <>i this matter, so far as raising 
the wages of the laborers is concerned. \\ hen 
there is anything to he done for the poor laboring 
men there is always some dodge to defeat it. Now 
is the time to consider it, when the appropriations 
are to be made, so that the Paving, Health and 
Water departments may receive a large ap- 

firopriation for an increase in the wages of the 
aborers. I tried to get ail order passed to restore 
a hundred thousand dollars to the Paving Depart- 
ment appropriation) but it was rejected. Now 
they have asked for $118,000 for the School Com- 
mittee. [ hope the gentlemen will not treat the 
laborers as they have heretofore, in the face of 
their treatment of the school teachers, who don't 
work so hard and get larger salaries. 

Mr. O'Dowd— As a matter of fact. I was not the 
one who introduced the original order, so t hat the 
remark of my friend from Ward 9, that it was 
suspiciously near election time, has no reference 
to me. 

Mi. Greenough — I did not so intend it. 

Mr. O'Dowd — I simply introduced this order be- 
cause it was ordered by the last < litj Government 
that this matter should be referred to this City 
Government, and I think it would be in order for 
the Chair to appoint such a committee. 

Mr. Swift of Ward 9—1 don't know as I have any 
particular objection to the appointment of thi> 
committee, but it seems to methatanj action oi 
this sort is uncalled for and unnecessary; because, 
without it this matter will be attended to, and 
probably better than the committee would be able 
to do it themselves— because, if no order was 
passed, and no committee appointed, each depart- 
ment would consider the question how much they 
would have to pay the laborers in the coin- 
ing year, and " having made up their 
opinions on the subject, they would make 
their reports and estimates accordingly. So 
it seems to me, as the matter is g >ing to be con- 
sidered anyway, and will be considered in the 

several departments, who know the work that 

they have to do and the kind of laborers they 
would have to employ, I should think it would be 
done more intelligently in that way than if we 
have a committee to consider the whole depart- 
ments as a general system. Therefore, although 
1 have no objection to this order, 1 shall vote 
against it because I consider it unnecessary. 
Mr. O'Dowd— 1 am very sorry this matter 
given rise to this discussion. 1 did n't suppi 
was necessary to debate it at ail. But I would 
like the gentlemen oi the Council to reflect for a 
moment and consider when there was a time 
when the heads of departments voluntarily put 

mto the estimates an item for an increase of the 

pay of laborers in their department. 1 don't 
think we have such an instance. I think this 
matter of an increase of the wages ol the labor- 
ers has always bt en brought up in the City Coun- 
cil, and thi' laborers have never received an in- 
se of wages unless the matter was first brought 
up in the City Council, and the heads of depart- 
ments were notified thai it was the sense of the 
City Council that the laborers Should receive an 
increase of wages. I don - ', imagine for a moment 
that anyone in this Common Council will con- 
sider in connection with the high prices of ail 
articles constituting the necessaries of life, that 
an increase of wages is an unreasonable thing to 
be granted t,<> the laborers in the several depart- 
ments. The mere matter of a dollar and a half a 
day is a small tiling for a laborer upon which to 
BUpport his tamiiy and properly educate his chil- 
dren, if the heads ol departments take into con- 
sideration the matter of anincreaseof wages oi 
the laborers under rliem. they will only do so 
when the members ol the City Council notify 

them that it is the sense of the city Government 
that the pay Of the laborers should be increased. 

The order was passed. 

Tne President appointed Messrs. O'Dowd of 
Ward 6, Greenough oi Ward 9, and Christal of 
Ward 8 on said committee. 

A motion to reconsider by Mr. Christal, hoping 
it would not prevail, was lost. 

M.w I OUST HOI 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12 offered an order- 
That the Committee on the Judiciary be Instruct- 
ed to investigate and report upon the rights and 
duties of the Common Council in the matter of 
building a new Court House in lioston. 



The order was passed to a second reading and 
put upon its passage. 

Mr. Bailey ol Ward 4 — Before that order is 
adopted I would like to hear from my friend some 
reason for it. It is simply through ignorance that 
I make the request. 

Mr. Whitmore— The reason why 1 introduced 
that order is that his Honor the Mayor in his in- 
augural address called attention to the fact that 
certain powers given lo the Board Of Aldermen 
by the Legislature had expired, they having ex- 
hausted them by their exercise. In looking at the 
matter myself to see how that affected the peti- 
tion of the Common Council, I found that the 
subject was quite involved, and l therefore de- 
sired that it might be brought before the .Judi- 
ciary Committee, who are Instructed always to 
obtain the opinion (it t he City Solicitor m doubt- 
ful cases and tind out whether there are any pow- 
er- belonging to the Council in the matter. My 
own impression is. so far as I can judge, that con- 
current action by both branches is requisite at 
the present time"; but I don't leel at all certain 
about it, because it depends upon the fag ends of 
Several Statutes which have been altered and 
Changed and several portions repealed. Know- 
ing that the Judiciary Committee is composed 
mosth oi lawyers, I thought that the proper place 
to make the Inquiry. 

Mr. Bailey — I would like to inquire if there is 
any proposition for a new Court House pending 

be i ore 1 he City ( ioverilinent? 

Mr. Whitmore — The matter stands In this way: 
There is a recommendation by his Honor the Mayor 
that something be done. At the last meeting of the 
Hoard of Aldermen, a document described in the 

Eapers as a huge petition signed by a large num- 
er of influential citizens, beaded by Henry W. 
Paine and other nieinbi ra of the Suffolk 
bar, was referred to a special committee of 
the Hoard of Aldermen. As I have already 
stated. I think there are perhaps duties devolv- 
ing upon the Council. I think we ought to un- 
derstand our rights mikI duties in this matter. 
For that reason 1 wanted t lie legal committee of 
this body to investigate the matter. 

Mr. Swift Of Ward!)— Iain not sure whether I 
am right, but if 1 remember the Mayor's sugges- 
tion cm rectlv t was to the effect that if we build 
such a Court House as we really ought to build, 
we could not afford it at present. That is the way 
I understood that part 01 themessai 
Mr. Bailey— I trust this order will not prevail. 

Simply because at some time this may be a moot- 
ed question is no reason for the Council to inquire 
into it at the present, tune. We might as well in- 
quire Into the rights of the Common Council in 
regard to building a new bridge, a new City Hall 
or new cemetery, for the reason that either of 
those matters may at some tune be undertaken. I 
hope that duty will not be imposed upon that 
committee, for it is one , it those things that they 
ought not to be compelled to go into and examine 
the intricacies of the law without some necessity 
for it. 

Mr. Whitmore— It is with reluctance that I 
arise to make some further remarks upon the 
subject, which is simply one of Inquiry. 1 take it 
for granted that every committee appointed by 
this body is eager and anxious to work, particu- 
larly between the hours of one and two. I think 
there is no difficulty in getting a committee to 
meet at City Hall. So far as the Committee on the 
Judiciary is concerned, there is no more likelihood 
of its being overworked this year than the year 
before. But as to the exigency which the gentle- 
man has relei red to. up to within a few months 
there was no question about the power of the 
Board ol Aldermen to take one step in regard to 
building a new Court House. There was no ques- 
tion but what the Council would be called upon. 
Now, the gentleman from Ward 4 has not, proba- 
bly, kept himself informed upon the proceedings 
of the City Council for two or three years. He 
was, probably, not aware of the fact that 
this matter was discussed a little over a 
year ago, during the year 1878, and Mr. 
Crocker of Ward 9 at that time was very 
desirous that a state of affairs should arise exact- 
ly the same as has now succeeded. The Board Oi 
Aldermen having exhausted their powers under 
tne act, the matter falls back upon the statutes 
giving the City Council power to buy land for 
public buildings. The matter has been changed 
within two or three months, and as the other 
branch has assumed certain powers, it seems per- 
fectly reasonable that we should know how the 



JAN Q All Y 15 



1880 



^3 



matter stands. There is no pressing emergency 
beyond that. But if this year an attempt should 
be made by the Board of Aldermen to ask for 
further powers, it may be desirable for the Coun- 
cil to consider whether they shall join in the re- 
quest or not. The exigency may arise during the 
present session of the Legislature. I hope the 
gentleman will be willing to give us the benefit of 
his services on this matter, and I hope the Coun- 
cil will order the reference of the subject to a 
committee who will attend to the subject. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4— It is simply because I am 
willing to work that I oppose the passage of this 
order. Suppose a committee in the other branch 
should report that they have no other powers, 
then we should have spent all our force. If they 
determine that it is necessary to have additional 
legislation, then it will be well for the Council to 
determine whether it will ask for it. Then I 
should be willing to give the necessary time and 
attent on to it. But I am not willing to give my 
attention and time to a matter which perhaps 
will be worth nothing. When the Board of Alder- 
men have taken the position that they have cer- 
tain rights and the Council none, then I am will- 
ing that the Council should take some action to 
find out what its rights are. 

Mr. Whitmore — The gentleman makes two mis- 
takes. The Committee on the Judiciary is not a 
joint committee, and it will require no'action of 
the Committee on Ordinances. Then, in the sec- 
ond place, the Board of Aldermen have appoint- 
ed a special committee, following upon the pow- 
ers which they have held for twelve years, and 
which the Mayor says were exhausted. The case 
has arisen The Board of Aldermen, in good 
faith, have assumed to exercise cenain powers, 
and I think we should ascertain whether we have 
any powers in the matter or not. 

Mr. Bailey— I crave the indulgence of the Coun- 
cil for occupying so much time. I don't wish the 
Council or the gentleman to understand that I 
understood that the Judiciary Committee was a 
joint committee. Neither have I asserted that 
there will be a report from the Committee on Or- 
dinances. But I had supposed that there would 
be a report from the committee of the Board oi 
Aldermen, and then wiien they attempt to exer- 
cise any powers which the gentleman or any other 
member of thejCouncil thinks is derogatory to the 
dignity of this mattter, then will be the time to 
refer this matter to the Judiciary Committee to 
consider and report upon it. But I don't want 
the committee to be required to consider abstruse 
points of law unless there is a necessity for it. I 
submit to the Council that it is putting upon the 
committee a work which would be entirely un ; 
necessary. 

The order was declared rejected. Mr. Whitmore 
doubted the vote. T he Council was divided— 34 
for, 28 against, and the order was declared passed. 
Sent up. 

THE JOINT BULES. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 moved the adoption of the 
twenty-third joint rule of last year, the adoption 
of which was deferred at the last meeting. The 
rule provides that the joint rules and orders shall 
not be altered, amended or suspended in any way 
except by the concurrent vote of both branches 
of the City Council. 

The motion prevailed. Subsequently a motion 
to reconsider by Mr. Sibley, hoping it would not 
prevail, was lost. Sent up. 

RULES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12— The vote just passed, 
perhaps, makes it a proper time for me to bring 
forward a certain matter in regard to the rules of 
the Council, they still remaining without the 
clinching clause which has been applied to the 
joint rules. It is a matter which the members 
of the Council will remember I attempted to 
have printed at the special meeting of the Com- 
mon Council, so that the amendments I have to 
offer might be before the members. Tt is also a 
matter or record that that effort was opposed by a 
member of the Committee on Rules and Orders, 
and that the common courtesy of printing a doc- 
ument and assigning a time for its consideration 
was used. 1 do not remember in my experience, 
or in my examination of the records, to have seen 
a time when a member of a committee, either un- 
willing or unable to attend to a subject, was un- 
willing to allow another member such a courtesy. 
The only argument iirought up was to vote down 
the amendments. Now, sir, 1 give notice that I 
shall not propose to amend the rules of the Coun- 
cil. I desire the City Messenger to distribute 



these copies to the members of the Council. It is 
an unusual thing for a member to be compelled to 
take a roundabout method of bringing in a mat- 
ter affecting the public interest before the Coun- 
cil. I desire also at this time that the reporter 
shall place these amendments upon the record 
as a part of my speech, and thus save the 
Council the necessity of listening to them. 
I do not propose to offer these amend- 
ments. When I made the statement a week ago, 
that the rules of the Commoa Council were de- 
fective and needed revision, I spoke of a matter 
of which I thought I knew something. I am now 
forced to produce the matter Here in'print for my 
own justification. I challenge any member of 
this Council to contradict any of the statements I 
make in regard to the rules to which I have 
pointed attention on this statement. But I am 
not going to weary the Council with the consid- 
eration ol these amendments. Defective rules are 
the strongholds of minorities. I have no desire 
personally to correct rules which are defective. 
Knowing the weak points of the rules, I can find 
them for my purposes during the present year. 
But I beg you to remember one thing, and that is, 
it is within the power of any one member of this 
Council to set aside the rules as they stand, by 
calling upon you for a ruling upon a sentence 
which cannot convey a correct impression to the 
Council. It is also a tact, in regard to reconsid- 
eration, that any one member can oblige this 
Council, if there are seventy-one members against 
him, either to repeal or alter a rule as it stands 
now, else he can delay the public business 
week by week. In other words, any member can, 
by insisting upon the right of reconsideration, 
reduce it to a mockery by going the next day and 
filing a notice such as is provided by the rules and 
orders. It does not seem to me that after the 
defects in the rules have been pointed out, 1 he 
Council will be willing to let them remain as they 
are. The amendment offered by Mr. Whitmore is 
as follows: 

Proposed Amendments to the Rules of the Common 
Council. 

1. Rule 5. Add "All vacancies shall be filled in 
the manner of their appointment, and the mem- 
bers so appointed or elected shall take rank ac- 
cording to the date of their appointment." 

2. Strike out Rule 13. 

3. Rule 18. Strike out at the end the words 
"before such vote," and insert "originally" before 
the word "entitled." 

4. Transfer Rules 26, 27 and 28 to the end, to be 
joined with the rules passed in May, 1879. 

5. Strike out in Rule 35 the word "standing." 

6. Substitute for Rules 45 and 68 the following: 
"All officers receiving any compel sation from 

the city of Boston or county of Suffolk, who are 
primarily elected by the City Council, shall be 
chosen in this branch oy ballot. Nominations of 
such officers shall be made by nominating com- 
mittees, whose reports shall lie over for one week 
before action is taken thereon. [All nominations 
of salaried officers by his Honor the Mayor shail 
be referred to a committee of three members of 
the Common Council, and their report shall lie 
over for one week before action is taken.] All 
confirmations of the Mayor's nominations shall be 
by a yea and nay ballot." 

7. Rule 46. Add ys follows: "No motion shall 
require to be seconded except an appeal from the 
decision of the Chair." 

8. In Rule 49, line 6, for the words "to postpone 
to a day certain," substitute the words "to special- 
ly assign to a certain hour." 

Also strike out the last four lines, and insert a 
new rule, as follows: 

"These several motions shall have precedence 
in the order in which they stand arranged They 
shall not be applied to each other, except that an 
amendment may be amended, and the time speci- 
fied for a special assignment may be amended. 
A substitute for a bill or a section of a bill shall 
be deemed an amendment. The previous ques- 
tion may be demanded upon an amendment, and 
that motion shall be decided without debate." 

9. In Rule 51, trarsfer "a joint standing com- 
mittee" to the first, place. 

10. In Rule 52, strike out the words "except 
upon an immediate repetition," and insert 

"Provided, however, that when a matron to ad- 
journ has been negatived, a motion of some kind 
must be offered, or a vote of some kind taken, be- 
fore a motion to adjourn can be again enter- 
tained." 

11. For Rule 53 substitute a new draft, as fol- 
lows: 



24 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



"Debate on the call for the previous questions, 
or ou a motion to lay on the table, or to take 
from the table, shall not exceed ten minutes. In 
such debate, however, the merits of the main 
question shall not be discussed." 

12. Add to Rule 62, as follows: "The question 
shall be put as follows: "Shall the decision of the 
Ch:iir stand as the judgment of the Council?" 
And it shall be deemed to be decided in the affirm- 
ative unless a majority of the votes given are to 
vhe contrary." 

13. Substitute for Rule 66 and the first two 
lines and a half of Rule t>7, the following J 

66. "The vote upon any motion which has not 
already taken effect, may be reconsidered once 
and once only. A motion to reconsider may be 
made immediately after the announcement of 
such vote, or under the seventh clause of Rule 41. 

"Any member who voted with the majority may 
give notice to the Clerk, within twenty-four hours 
after the adjournment of any meeting (except the 
final meeting of the year, or that preceding any 
adjournment of the Council for over two weeks), 
that he intends to move a reconsideration of any 
motion passed at such meeting. The Clerk shall 
retain all the papers connected with such motion 
until the reconsideration has been decided. 

"Whenever a matter has been specially assigned 
to a time beyond the period fixed by Rule 41 tor 
action on motions tu reconsider, a notice as above 
specified, to reconsider any vote affecting the 
provisions of such ordinance, order or resolution 
shall be considered whenever such special assign- 
ment takes effect. 

"Rale 67, Debate on motions to reconsider 
shall be held to open the main question for dis- 
cussion; it shall be limited to thirty minutes, and 
no member shall speak tor more" than five iniu- 
utes. The vote accepting or rejecting the motion 
to reconsider shall not be reconsidered If a re- 
consideration be granted, the motion as finallv 
passed, whether amended or not, shall not be 
open to a motion to reconsider ag;iin." 

14. The remainder of Kule 67 as a new rule. 

15. Rule 68 is omitted, being already consid- 
ered. 

16. After Rule 71, insert the following: 

1. The seats of the members of the Council 
shall be numbered, and shall be determined, in the 
presence of the Council, by drawing the names of 
members and the number of the seats >i i ulta- 
neously; and each member shall be entitled for 
the year to the seat bearing the number so drawn 
against bis name, and shall nut change it, except 
by the permission of the President. 

2. Nope son, except a member of the Council, 
shall be permitted to occupy the seat ot any mem- 
ber while the Council is in session. 

3. It shall be the duty of the City Messenger to 
see that no person or persons are allowed upon 
the floor of the Council Chamber, or in the ante- 
rooms, on the easterly side oi the same, while the 
Council is iii session and after the Beats provided 
for spectators have been occupied, excepting 
members of the City Government and reporters. 

4. The Council chamber shall be used for meet- 
ings of the Council only, unless by the vote of the 
Common Council; provided that during the sum- 
mer recess the President may allow the chamber 
to be used for public put pose-, in all cases report- 
ing his action to the Council at its next meeting. 

5. The ante-room and large committee room on 
the ►'ast side shall be subject to the same rules; 
except that the President may allow committee 
meetings at times when the Council is not in ses- 
sion. 

6. The Clerk's room shall be assigned to the 
Clerk of the Common Council for occupancy and 
use. 

7. The ante-room between the Council Cham- 
ber and the Clerk's room shall be used during the 
meetings of the Council to give access to the seats 
(ui the Boor, and such other purposes as the Pres- 
ident may direct; provided that smoking there 
Shall not'he allowed on the part of visitors. 

8. The large room assigned to the use of the 
President and Council, by order o| May 27, 1879, 
i~ hereby assigned to the President for occupancy 
and use. 

9. The general care and supervision of these 
rooms are hereby intrusted to the City Messenger, 
subject to the direction ot the President; but no 
expenditure of money shall lie made except by 
direct vote of the Common Council 

10. All bills for refreshments or carriage hire 
incurred by the Common Council, the standing 
committees of the Common Council not having 
charge of any appropriation, or individual mem- 



bers of the Common Council while engaged in the 
discharge of official duty, shall give the names of 
the persons incurring the same, and after having 
been approved by the committee or certified to 
by the members who incurred the same, the 
President of the Common Council is authorized 
to approve the same, as provided for in the an- 
nual appropriation order under the head of Con- 
tingent Fund of the Common Council; and the 
Auditor of Accounts is authorized to allow the 
same for payment; provided, that no bill shall be 
approved by the President unless it be presented 

to him lor approval before the end of the month 
next succeeding that within which the expense 
covered by such bill was incurred. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4— I would ask the gentle- 
man if he had any objection to the proposed rules 
being referred to the Committee on Rules, with 
instructions to report at the next meeting? 

Mr. Whitmore— I will arrive at that in one mo- 
ment. Individually I am going to make one propo 
sition. On the last page you Mill perceive are the 
rules marked 1 to 9, which are the rules passed by 
this Council in regard to the care and custody of 
its rooms. The first three are the rules which 
now stand as Rules 26, 27 and 28. As we have 
passed four or five other orders in regard to the 
custody of the rooms, I shall make a motion be 
fore I sit down to transfer Rules 26, 27 and 28 to 
the end of the arrangement, so that they shall be 
printed after Rule 71, and in connection with the 
six rules adopted last May. I should move to 
have printed in that place "Rule 10, which is an 
annual order passed this year in regard to the 
duty and power of the Auditor and President in 
certifying bills. That order is annually passed and 
every n ember of the Council ought to have it un- 
der liis eye. I can say that the lack of printing 
th?t order in the rules has been a stumbling block 
to me the past year. These amendments I shall 
make are merely matters of form and for the con- 
venience of the President and the members. In 
regard to the other changes, I shall not make any 
proposition to refer to the Committee on Joint 
Rules or the Committee on Rules of the Common 
Council. They have refused me the opportunity 
of bringing this matter before the Council. They 
have treated me in the same way in regard to the 
joint rules. Tney were referred to that commit- 
tee and a written report has been made, and the 
Council cannot understand them. Having forced 
me to the trouble and expense of printing these 
proposed amendments to the rules, I do not in- 
tend to submit any bantling of mine to the tender 
mercies of that committee. After the encour- 
agement I have thus far obtained from the 
committee, I shall not make any further 
motion. 1 have pointed out the defects in the 
rulesoftheCounc.il. The warning exists, and it 
is for the Council to take such action as they see 
fit. I shall not propose them to the Council. * But 
if anybody ventures to attack them I shall be 
ready to defend them. I shall move now that 
Rules 26, 27 and 28 be transferred to the Rule 
after 71, and be printed in connection with the 
rules of last year, and that the annual order be 
printed with them. 

The President — The question is upon transfer- 
ing Rules 26, 27 and 28 to come after Rule 71, and 
in that case the order passed in May last be 
printed, and also the rule marked on the paper 
as No. 10, so that those rules will read, as appears 
upon this printed programme, from No. 1 to 10 
inclusive. 

Mr. Bailey— As I understand rroin tne remarks 
of the gentleman from Ward 12 that we have no 
report from the committee upon these proposed 
amendments to the rules, I cannot see how we 
can make up our minds intelligently as to the ex- 
pediency of adopting them. I should like to have 
time to read thein and have the committee report 
upon them. For that reason I would move that 
the amendments be referred to the Committee on 
Rules, wiih instructions to report to the next 
meeting. 

Mr. Whitniore— I only wish to call the attention 
of the gentleman from Ward 4 to the point that 
the amendments I have offered are those on the 
last page, numbered 1 to 10, ail of which are now 
in print and have been adopted at various times 
by the Council. The motion I make is to place 
them at the end of the existing rules. I propose 
no change in the rules as they stand. 

Mr. Bailey— You don't propose those amend- 
ments? 

Mr. Whitniore — Ho, sir. I only asked as a mat- 
ter of convenience that the rules as adopted in 
January be printed in a certain form. I am not 



JANUARY 15, 1880. 



going to offer any amendments, or make any sug- 
gestions unless they are attacked. 

Mr. Bailey — Then I move that these amend- 
ments be referred to the Committee on Rules, 
■with instructions to report at the next meeting 
of the Council. 

Mr. Swift— I rose to make the same motion. 

Mr. O'Dowd— I raise the point that the motion 
of Mr. Whitmore is before the house. 

The President — The motion to refer takes 
precedence. 

Mr. Whitmore — I think the gentleman is con- 
fusing two motions. The motion I made was that 
certain portions of this paper, the only rules I 
have offered, be placed in a certain place in the 
printed rules. Now, as I understand, the gentle- 
man from Ward 4 has very kindly offered to 
adopt the rest of the printed document himself, 
and have it referred to the committee. There is 
no reason why these ten rules which are in print 
should be referred to the committee. It is a mat- 
ter which should be allowed to stand on its own 
merits. It is a matter of mere form. If anybody 
moves to adopt the other amendments, or to re- 
fer them to anybody, I have no objection. It is 
not necessary to send them to the committee. 
They are existing rules, and it is only a question 
on what page of the manual they shall be printed. 

Mr. Swift of Ward 9—1 should like to ask what 
the matter is before us. I understood the gentle- 
man to move to refer the matter to the commit- 
tee. 

The President— Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12 has 
made a motion that Rules 1 to 9 inclusive, which 
are now a part of the rules and orders of the 
Common Council, be transposed so that they 
shall come after Rule 71; also that Rule 10 be 
adopted as a rule of the Council, to come after 
the rule he has referred to. The Chair under- 
stands Mr. Bailey of Ward 4 to move that those 
Rules 1 to 10 inclusive be referred to the Commit- 
tee on Rules, to consider and report at the next 
meeting of the Council. Also that Mr. Bailey 
moves that all these amendments be referred to 
the committee; but the Chair is of opinion that 
must come as a separate motion. 

Mr. Bailey — Strictly speaking, my motion is an 
amendment to the motion of the gentleman 
from Ward 12. He proposed that certain rules be 
adopted or changed. I moved as an amendment 
that all these amendments to the rules as printed 
in this document be added to the proposed 
changes, ana the whole subject be referred to the 
committee, to report at the next meeting. If any- 
body desires a division, they will be entitled to it; 



but it seems to me the best thing will be to refer 
the whole matter. We shall have all the speeches 
made here this evening for and against the 
amendments, and we shall save time by referring 
it. 

The President — The Chair thinks the trouble 
with the matter is this — what are marked here as 
proposed amendments are not properly before the 
Council, inasmuch as they have not been offered, 
•with the exception of Rules 1 and 2, and therefore 
the Chair cannot see how they can be referred to 
the Committee on Rules. 

Mr. Bailey — I offered them as an amendment to 
the gentleman's motion. 

The President — Then the Chair understands 
that Mr. Whitmore moved that the rules 
from 1 to 9 inclusive be transferred in 
position so as to come after Rule 71; that 
Rule No. 10 be adopted as a rule of the 
Council, to come after the nine preceding rules. 
Mr. Bailey of Ward 4 offers as an amendment all 
contained upon the first two pages of this printed 
document, and moves they be referred to the Com- 
mittee on Rules. 

Mr. Whitmore— Now that the gentleman has 
stated it in that way, I am perfectly willing to let 
it go to the committee if the Council chooses. 
The gentleman has adopted the amendments as 
his own so far as the first two pages are con- 
cerned. 

The whole subject was referred to the Commit- 
tee on Rules and Orders, with instructions to re- 
port at the next meeting. 

PUBLIC URINALS. 

Mr. Maguire of Ward 19 offered an order — That 
the Board of Health be requested to provide a 
urinal in a convenient and suitable locality in 
Ward 16. 

Mr. Christal moved to amend by inserting 
Ward 8. 

Mr. Lauten moved to include Ward 14. 

Mr. Maguire accepted both amendments, say- 
ing that he offered the order at the request of 
citizens of Ward 16. 

Mr. Brintnall said there was much need for one 
in Ward 8. 

On motion of Mr. Coe, the order was referred 
to the Joint Committee on Health. Sent up. 

Mr. Whitmore moved a reconsideration of the 
order instructing the Judiciary Committee to as- 
certain the rights and duties of the Common 
Council respecting a new Court House, hoping it 
would not prevail. Lost. 

Adjourned on motion of Mr. Devlin of Ward 13. 



•>ri 



6 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 19, 1880. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock, P. M., Alder- 
man O'Brien, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECI TI\ K APPOINTMENTS. 

Public Weigher— Patrick Hart. Confirmed. 
Weigher of Coal and Measurer of Wood and 
Bark— Frank A. Marston. Confirmed. 

PETITIONS KKI'ERHED. 

I ii the Joint Committee on Claims. Cyrus T. 
P.achelder, to be paid damages for injuries to his 
mother, and damages to his carriage, on Dorches- 
ter avenue, Nov. 2, 1879; George M. King, to be 
compensated for the loss of a horse Dec. 24, 1879, 
on Columbus avenue; George M. King, to be paid 
For the loss of a horse on Columbus avenue Jan. 
9, 1879; Kate Sullivan, to be compensated for per- 
sonal injuries caused by the defective condition 
of the sidewalk, 62 and 64 Cambridge street, on 
Jan. 1. 1880; Thomas Canfield, to be compensated 
tor persona) injuries caused to his team by the de- 
fective condition of Benson street on Jan. 10, 1880. 

To the Committee to Nominate a Superintendent 
of Common and Public Grounds, Hermann Gran- 
de!, for the appointment of Superintendent of 
Common ami Public Grounds. 

i o the Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings on the part of the' Board. George F. 
Kendall, agent, for leave to project a plain lan- 
tern in front of the Fountain House, 414 Tremont 
street. 

To the Committee on County Accounts. Propri- 
etors of the Social Law Library for their annual 
appropriation for 1879. 

To thr Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Hoard. w. \.. Holland, to be compensated for 
land taken on a passagewav in widening Beach 
street in 1874. 

To the Committee on Salaries. William H. 
Mcintosh et ah, deputy collectors of the city of 
Boston, for an increase or salary. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Hoard. Petitions for leave to occupy stables as 
follows: Mrs Percy 1'. Nichols, new wooden, one 
horse, on Oriole street, corner of Nasbv street, 
Ward 21. 

To the Committee on Paving. James Dow et oh, 
that Norfolk street be graded and put in order; 
1). 1). Kelly et at., that portions of Sumner street, 
Maverick square, etc., be paved with small gran- 
ite blocks; O. F. Deshon et a?., that Washington 
street, from Walkhill street to Dedham line, be 
gravelled, etc.; H. A. Wood et al., that Burch 
street, West Roxbury, be graded; Sewall Day 
Cordage Company, for crosswalks on Parker 
street; J. C. Tucker, for edgestones on Mather 
street; Eliza A. Hartford, for abatement of side- 
walk assessment at :>4 Gates street, South Boston; 
J. I!, ami Wm. M. Warren, that the city agree with 
them for the use of their patent method of laying 
pavement. Susan Farren, for abatement of side- 
walk assessment at 75 Liverpool street; Thomas 
Groom era/., that Humphrey street be graded, 
and put in order; Martin T. Folan, that the spe- 
cial laborers of the Paving Department at South 
Boston be put at work; Union Freight Railroad 
Company, tor leave to lay down a track on Com- 
mercial street, from Atlantic avenue to Rich- 
mond street; H. B. Cross et al., that Seaverns 
avenue be graded and gravelled; Adolph Braner 
et al., that Baker street, West Roxbury, be put in 
proper condition for public travel; John S. Mc- 
intosh et al., that Lagrange street, West Roxbury, 
be graded and gravelled from Washington street 
to the Newton line; William Geraty, that he be 
paid lor grade damages on Tremont street; 
Thomas M. Fallon et al., that Mt. Hope street be 
graded and put in order; Richard Hickey et al., 
that Back street be graded and put in order; J. 
H. Skinner et al., that Sagamore street, Dorches- 
ter, be graded. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in Concurrence. 

Report (inexpedient) to make certain proposed 
amendments to the joint rules and orders. Ac- 
cepted in concurrence. 

Order tor Mayor to petition the Legislature for 
an act forbidding the removal of the Old State 
House without a vote of the citizens. Indefinitely 
postponed on motion of Alderman Flynn. 



Acceptance of invitation of Post 26, G. A. R., to 
attend memorial service on May 30, next. Con- 
curred. 

Report of Committee on Public Instruction in 
favor of an additional appropriation of $118,133 
for the maintenance of the public schools, and 
referring said subject to the Committee on Fi- 
nance. 

Report of the organization of the Committee on 
Finance for the present municipal year. Placed 
on file. 

Resolve and order for the Committee on Legis- 
lative Matters to consider what action is neces- 
sary to preserve the ancient burial grounds of 
this city. Concurred. 

An order to provide for the keeping of cross- 
walks of public streets clear of snow, etc., came 
up referred to Committee on Health. Concurred. 

An order to provide for issue of heliotypes of 
Lamb's map of the first division of lands in the 
town of Boston. Referred to the Committee on 
Public Library in concurrence, to report next 
week. 

Order for Board of Health to consider the ex- 
pediency of providing proper drainage for the 
cemetery in East Boston. Passed in concurrei.ee. 

Order appointing Messrs. Bailey, Hilton, Brint- 
nall, Austin and Doherty (to be joined) a commit- 
ter to examine and report upon the necessity of a 
new bridge over Charles River, between Wards 7 
and 5. Passed in concurrence, and Aldermen 
Thorndike and Walbridge were joined. 

Order for Inspector of Buildings to report to 
the City Council the condition ot the buildings 
burned on Federal and Devonshire streets, and it 
the building laws had been observed, and it any 
changes in such laws are necessary. Passed in 
concurrence. 

Order appointing Messrs. O'Dowd, Greenough 
and Christal (to be joined) a committee to con- 
sider the increase of laborers' pay. Passed in 
concurrence, and Aldermen Woolley and Caton 
were joined. 

An order to provide urinals in Wards 16, 8 and 
14 came up referred to Committee on Health. 
Concurred, 

The orders to ascertain the number of miles ot 
si reets in New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore, 
the cost of repairing and maintaining the same, 
and how much of the expense is paid by abutters, 
and to ascertain the cost of performing the du- 
ties of the Health Department in the above cities, 
came up amended, so that such information shall 
be obtained by correspondence addressed to the 
proper officials, and that the cost contributed by 
street railway companies to said cities be also 
ascertained. ' Concurred. 

( u;i: OF hie PUBLIC geounos. 

The following was received: 

The undersigned proposes to do all the work 
and furnish all -the plants, trees, shrubs, gravel, 
loam, sodding, and other material necessary for 
the proper care of the Common and public 
grounds, together with all the public squares be- 
longing to the city of Boston and under the con- 
trol of the Committee on Common and Squares, 
for the term of one year, for the sum of s:j0,000; 
said work to be done and material furnished un- 
der the direction of the Committee on Common 
and Squares, should said proposition be accept- 
ed, I fully further agree to give the city of Boston 
a bond satisfactory with satisfactory sureties for 
the faithful performance of said work. 

John Reardon, 46 Revere street. 

Boston, Jan. 9, 1880. 

The Chairman— What is the pleasure of the 
p.. ..ii d ■: 

Alderman Viles— I believe this is the same peti- 
tion that came in last year, only later In the sea- 
son. I don't know that this work can be done in 
this wa\ , anil be let out. but it seems to me that 
the petition is worth considering by the Commit- 
tee on Common and Squares to whom I think it 
should he refeired. Mr. Reardon is a practical 
gardener, who served considerable time in the old 
country. He is a man of means and can furnish 
any bond that the city may require. I move that 
the petition be referred to the Committee on Com- 
mon, and that they report back to the City Coun- 
cil. 

The petition was referred to the Committee on 
Common. Sent down. 

SEALER <>| WEIGHTS AND MEASUKi:s. 

The annual report (City Doc. 7) of the Sealer of 
Weights anil Measures was received and sent 
down. 



JAN U AHY 19 



1880 



27 



Expenditures $5,705.91 

Balance 1,427.31 

Work of the Department. 

Total number of scales tested from Jan. 1, 

1879, to Jan. 1, 1880 7,965 

Total number of weights tested from Jan, 1, 

1 879, to Jan. 1, 1880 29,228 

Total number of dry measures tested from Jan. 

1, 1879, to Jan. 1, 1880 3,054 

Total number of wet measures tested from Jan. 

1, 1879, to Jan. 1, 1880 4,974 

Total number of yard-sticks tested from Jan. 1, 

1879, to Jan. J, 1880 440 

Total number of charcoal baskets tested from 

Jan. 1, 1879, to Jan. 1, 1880 27 

Total number of salt tubs tested from Jan. 1, 

1879, to Jan. 1, 1880 2 

The sealer is required by law to visit, once in 
each year, all hay, coal, dormant, or other plat- 
form scales, that cannot be easily removed, and 
test them. In compliance with this requirement, 
a part of the appropriation has been expended in 
hiring a horse, wagon and man to transport the 
weights, tools, etc., used in testing said scales. 

The amount expended for this purpose from 
May 1, 1879, to Jan. 1, 1880, was $373.50 

The amount of work performed is as follows, 

and is included in the foregoing account of the 

operations of this department: 

Number of scales, 5000 pounds' to 80 tons'capaci- 
ty, tested 454 

Number of dormants, less than 5000 pounds' ca- 
pacity, tested 417 

Number of platforms tested 1 ,052 

" beams and balances tested 22 

public weighers' scales tested 4 

Total number of scales tested 1,949 

Number of scales tested and found correct 1,713 

" adjusted 106 

" " " " tagged for repairs 

and use forbidden 130 

Number of weights tested and found correct 7,788 

" " " " " light, and 

adjusted 487 

Number of weights tested and found heavy, and 
adjusted ... 260 

Total number of weights tested 8,535 

Total number of scales tested while using team. .1,949 
" weights " " " " ..8,535 

I deem it my duty to call the attention of the 
City Council to the law under which this depart- 
ment is operated, for the purpose of pointing out 
some defects, which, in my opinion, exist therein, 
and to present such recommendations as I believe 
to be necessary to increase the efficiency of this 
department. 

Section 1 of chapter 123 of the acts of 1876 pro- 
vides that, "The sealers of weights and measures 
in the several cities and towns shall annually give 
public notice by advertisement, or by public no- 
tice in one or more public places, in their respec- 
tive cities or towns, to all inhabitants, or persons 
having a usual place of business therein, who use 
scales, weights and measures, for the purpose of 
buying or selling any goods, wares, merchandise, 
or other commodities, or for public weighing, to 
bring in their scales, weights and measures, to be 
adjusted and sealed." 

It will be seen that under this section of the 
statute there is no way of obliging any person 
who uses scales, weights and measures, in buying 
or selling, to bring them to the office to be ad 
justed and sealed. Although the statute provides 
that all persons who use scales, etc., shall be noti- 
fied to bring them in to the sealer to have them 
sealed; yet in case of a failure to comply with the 
said notice no penalty is provided which can be 
imposed upon the person so neglecting, and con- 
sequently the law has practically no effect in ac- 
complishing the end for which it was enacted. In 
order to remedy this deficiency, and to provide 
means by which the scales, etc., belonging to such 
persons as have failed to comply with the require- 
ment of the statute may be tested and sealed, sec- 
tion 2 of the same law provides that, "At any time 
after said notice, the said sealers of weights and 
measures shall go to the houses, stores and shops 
of persons mentioned in the foregoing section, 
who have neglected to comply with the notice 
given thereunder, and having entered the same, 
with the consent of the occupants thereof, shall 
adjust and seal their scales, weights and meas- 
ures." 

In this section of the statute the duty of the 
sealer is clearly defined: he shall go to the houses, 
stores and shops of all persons who have failed to 
comply with his notice, and shall adjust and seal 
their scales, weights and measures. This provi- 



sion of the statute, it would seem, has been over- 
looked by the City Council during the past five 
years; or, if not overlooked, no adequate means 
have been provided by which the sealer would be 
enabled to perform this duty, which is required 
of him by the law. In consequence of this failure 
on the part of the City Council to provide means 
for a proper ana efficient performance of the 
duties connected with this department, the sys- 
tem of sending personal notices to such persons 
as are referred to by the statute has been adopted. 
This method has largely increased the work of 
the office, as will be seen by an examination of 
the report of the work of the department, herein 
submitted; and yet, although the work in this 
office is very much larger than in former years, a 
careful estimate of the number of scales in use in 
this city induces me to believe that at least half 
of the scales, weights and measures in use in Bos- 
ton have not been tested at this office. The hon- 
est, well-meaning and reputable dealers hasten to 
comply with the law, which requires them to have 
their scales and measures sealed, and have re- 
sponded in large numbers to the notices which 
have been sent to them by this office, and it af- 
fords me great pleasure, in presenting this report, 
to be able to testify t© the honesty and good in- 
tentions of so large a number of the people who 
do business in this city. As the law, however, 
applies to all persons who use scales, weights and 
measures, it is manifestly unjust to watch the 
honest and reputable dealers, who require nothing 
of the kind, and allow so large a number of others, 
either through ignorance of the law, indifference 
for its requirements, or a desire to use scales 
and measures which have been tampered with, or 
which they know are wrong, to escape the scrutiny 
of this department. 

The importance of this matter will be seen by a 
reference to the work of this office, where it will 
be seen that, of the scales tested and sealed, 
which were owned in most cases by the larger 
and more reputable dealers, nearly twenty-five 
per cent, were wrong, and that the same propor- 
tion of weights tested, viz., twenty-five per cent., 
were either adjusted or condemned. Such being 
the condition of the scales owned by the better 
class of dealers, who, have their scales sealed 
every year, I will leave to be inferred the con- 
dition of those scales and weights which are used 
by those persons who. year after year, treat the 
notices from this office, and the provisions of the 
law under which they are sent, with contempt. 
Now, as I believe the duty of government is to 
protect its citizens, and as I believe that care 
should be taken to prevent the poor and confiding 
from being defrauded by such persons as are dis- 
posed to use dishonest weights and measures, I 
submit that some provision should be made 
whereby all such persons could be reached, and 
made to comply with the law. In order that such 
a result may be attained, I would respectfully 
submit the following recommendations : 

1. That the City Council secure an amendment 
to the law relating to the sealing of weights and 
measures, which shall oblige all persons who use 
scales, weights and measures to bring them to the 
office of the sealer to have them tested and sealed, 
or in case of a failure to do so, to be liable to a 
penalty, to be mentioned in the statute; all such 
persons to be indicted upon complaint, to be made 
by the sealer. 

2. That the City Council make such provision 
as will enable the sealer, or his deputies, to' visit 
the places of business of all persons who use 
weights and measures, in order that the same 
may be tested and sealed. 

I desire also to call the attention of the City 
Council to that part of the law relating to the 
sealing of weights and measures, which requires 
that scales, etc., shall be sealed once in eaeh year. 
I have no positive knowledge that any scales, 
weights or measures have been altered after they 
have been sealed, and yet my suspicions have 
been aroused many times that such has been the 
case. In order to provide a check against such a 
possibility, and to furnish a means of detecting 
the fraud in case any person should tamper with 
or alter his scales and weights after the same had 
been sealed, I would recommend the propriety of 
authorizing the sealer, or his deputy, to visit the 
places of business of all persons who use scales, 
etc., in buying or selling, to test the same when- 
ever they may deem it necessary. Such a chance 
in the statute is, in my opinion, a very desirable 
one; it would be productive of a great deal of 
gooa, and furnish a wholesome check against, and 
a means of detecting dishonesty on the part of 



2g 



BOARD OF ALDERM EN 



any person who might be disposed to use unfair 
and illegal weights and measures. 

I would also recommend the propriety of requir- 
ing the sealer to give a certiticate to all persons 
who have their scales, etc., sealed by him, the cer- 
tificate to specify the number and kind of articles 
which have been tested and sealed, and to be 
placed in some prominent position in the place 
of business of the person to whom it is given; 
the form of the certificate to be such as would be 
adopted by the Committee en Weights and Meas- 
ures. 

This course would, in my opinion, have the effect 
of inducing the dealers to have their weights and 
measures sealed, as the trading public would nat- 
urally go to only such persons as had complied 
with the requirements of the law. 

si lil.V PIPES AND CASTINGS FOB Till: WATER 
mi' u;tmi:nt. 
The following was received : 

BOSTOH WATEB BOARD Ol Mi F , / 
Jan. 19, 1880. J 
To the City Council: Gentlemen — The Boston 
Water Board having determined the quantities 
of water pipes and special eastings which it will 
be necessary to purchase during the present year 
for the Cocnituate and Mystic departments of the 
works, respectfully ask for authority to contract 
for the same; to be paid for after the 1st of May 
next out of the appropriations to be made for the 
financial year 1880-81. The quantities required, 
as estimated by tne City Engineer, are— For the 
Cochituate works, 1075 tons of pipe and L'O tons of 
special castings; and for the Mystic works, 210 
tons of pipe and 10 tons of special castings. 

Boston Water Boabd, 
by Leonard B. Cutter, Chairman. 
Referred to the Joint Committee on Water. 
Sent down. 

OHARL] sinWN ALMSHOUSE. 

Alderman Vilea presented the following: 

Office of the 
Directors fob Public Institi rioxs,] 
Jan. 19, 1880. 
To the Honorable City Council of Boston . Gen- 

tleinen— The Hoard of Directors for Public Insti- 
tutions respectfully represent as to the condition 
of the almshouse building in the Charlestown 
District, that if it is to lie retained for its present 
uses a considerable outlay will be required to ren- 
tier it suitable for its inmates. The main build- 
ing was erected in 1849, and, although well-pre- 
served, is in several Important respects deficient 
in conveniences and requirements necessary to 
the proper care of the inmates, according to the 
standard of the present day. The building re- 
quires thorough overhauling; the system of heat- 
ing should be entirely changed, and other repairs 
are needed which will involve considerable ex- 
penditure. The location of the building is objec- 
tionable, and its surroundings are such as to 
render it. in the opinion of the Board, unsuitable 
for almshouse purposes. Even if the necessary 
repairs were made. In view of these facts, the 
Board of Directors, after careful consideration of 
the subject, are convinced that the wisest course 
is to discontinue this almshouse as a separate in- 
stitution. There are now eighty-six inmates at 
this place, forty-three of each sex. There is am- 
ple room at Kainsford Island for the males, and 
the completion of the new building at the Austin 
Farm' affords convenient and comfortable accom- 
modations for the females. It is believed that the 
transfer of the inmates fromCharlestown to these 
institutions will prove to be an economical and 
prudent measure; and the Board of Directors 
hereby respectfully request the City Council for 
authority to remove the inmates now at the 
Charlestown to Kainsford Island and Austin 
Farm, and discontinue the almshouse in the 
Charlestown district. Respectfully, 

sami el Little, 
President of the Board of Directors for Public 
Institutions. 

Referred to the Committee on Public Institu- 
tions. Sent down. 

\ arious rei'orts of cm officers. 

Superintendent of Congress-street Bridge. Re- 
port for the year 1879, that 16,152 vessels passed 
through the draw in that year. Sent down. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters. Report 
for quarter ending Dec. 31, 1879— HI vessels were 
inspected, with cargoes amounting to 7475 tons. 
Fees received, $373.75; expenses, $12.80; divided 
by the incumbents, $360.95. Accepted. Sent 
down. 



Superintendent of Sorth Scales. Report for 
quarter ending Dec. .11, 1879— Receipts for Octo- 
ber, $244.1."); November, $197.15; December, $218.87. 
Expenses for October, $9.83; For "November, $6.82; 
for December, $5.94. Accepted. Sent down. 

STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Flynn submitted the following from 
the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board: 

orders to pay for land taken and all damages 
occasioned by laying out streets, as follows: 

Lizzie Ann Percy, $735.67, laying out Anawan 
avenue; Sarah £. Willis, $139.50, relocation of 
Washington street, at Brighton, from Cambridge 
to Market street; Daniel Osborne, $664.25, do.; 
heirs of William Warren, $289, do.; Caroline D. 
Apollonio, $26.50, relocation of Warren street, 
near Blue Hill avenue. Severally passed. 

Ordered, That the order of this Hoard of Oct. 6, 
ls7:i, to pay Francis Raynes the sum of eighty- 
eight hundred dollars, for damages to his estate 
on Commercial street, upon certain conditions, 
be, and the same hereby is, so far modified that the 
City Solicitor lie authorized to receive from said 
Raynes a release of all his right, title and inter- 
est" in so much of the estate taken from him as 
lies within the limits of Luther place, so called. 

Alderman Flynn— In looking at the title to this 
estate it was found that a part of the estate was 
in a passageway which this man could not give a 
warranty deed for. The matter has been before 
the City 'Solicitor, and he is satisfied with that 
modification of the order. 

The order was passed. 

COMMONWEALTH \\ 1M ! . 

Alderman Flynn offered an order— That the 
Joint Standing Committee on Streets be. and 
they are, hereby authorized to contract for filling 
all or any part of Commonwealth avenue exten- 
sion, whenever the owners of lands abutting on 
said extension shall enter into an agreement with 
the city for the simultaneous filling of their lands, 
within the bounds of Beacon street. West Chester 
park and the Boston & Albany Railroad; said 
agreement and all contracts for such filling of 
Commonwealth avenue extension to be approved 
by his Honor the Mayor and City Solicitor, the 
expense of such tilling to be charged to the loan 
for tilling Commonwealth avenue extension. 
Passed. Sent down. 

SALES ltv .MINORS. 

Alderman Breck submitted the following: 
Ordered, That all licenses granted to minors for 
the pursuit of any vocation, or for the sale of any 
fruits or provisions whatever, live animals, 
brooms, agricultural implements, fuel, newspa- 
pers, books or pamphlets, agricultural products 
of the United States, the products of his own 
labor or any labor of his own family, tor which 
licenses are by law required to be granted by this 
Board, shall be granted upon the following terms 
and conditions, which shall be inserted in the cer- 
tificate, with such other conditions and regula- 
tions as this Board may deem expedient, viz.: 

1. No minor shall be licensed as a hawker or 
pedler, or as a bootblack, in this city, except upon 
application of his parent, guardian or next iriend. 

2. Every minor so licensed shall attend some 
school, approved by the School Committee, each 
day during the school year. 

3. All licenses shall specify the articles to he 
sold, or the business to be pursued, and the 
licenses issued to bootblacks shall contain the 
places assigned therefor. 

4. Each minor licensed by tne Board of Alder- 
men shall, at all times while engaged in the busi- 
ness, lor which he is licensed, wear, conspicuously 
in sight, a badge with the word "Licensed" and 
the number of his license thereon; a neglect so 
to do shall be a sufficient cause for a revocation of 
said license. 

5. No minor so licensed shall sell any articles, 
or pursue any business for which he may be li- 
censed, at any other place than that mentioned in 
his license. 

6. Minors so licensed shall not congregate to- 
gether, make any unnecessary noise, or in any 
other way disturb or annoy persons as they pass. 

7. Ail licenses shall be granted for a definite 
period, and all licenses which are not for a shorter 
period shall terminate on the first Monday of 
January in each successive year, and all licenses 
which are not expressed for a shorter period shall 
extend to the close of the municipal year. 

8. Each minor so licensed shall exhibit his li- 
cense to any officer of the city for inspection, 



J ANUAK Y 19 



188 



29 



when required so to do, and the same shall not be 
transferred, exchanged, borrowed or lent, nor 
shall he employ, or furnish with papers to sell, 
any unlicensed minor, on pain of forfeiture of 
said license. 

9. Stands for the purpose of blacking boots 
and shoes may be located in such places as shall 
not interfere with the convenienee of the public, 
and they shall be under the immediate super- 
vision of the Truant Officer in whose district such 
stands may be located, and the said officer shall 
be responsible for the good order and discipline 
of the occupants. 

10. Truant officers may designate and establish 
such number of stands for bootblacss within 
their several districts as, in their judgment, the 
public good may require, and no more than one 
licensed minor shall occupy any such stand; and 
any such minor who allows idle persons to assem- 
ble around him at such stand shall have his per- 
mit annulled. 

11. The violation of the laws of the State, the 
ordinances of the city, or the terms and condi- 
tions herein described, shall operate as a forfeit- 
ure of this license. 

The order was passed. 

TREES. 

Alderman Flynn submitted a report from the 
Committee on Common on the part of the Board, 
on petition of Atherton T. Brown, for the re- 
moval of three trees from Mt. Pleasant avenue, 
near Fairland street— That the petitioner be al- 
lowed to remove, at his expense, two of the trees 
mentioned, being the two nearer Fairland street. 
Accepted. 

ELECTIONS. 

Trubtees of the City Hospital. A report came 
down nominating Alderman Joseph A. Tucker 
and Councilmen John P. Hilton and George H. 
Wyman for Trustees of the City Hospital. Ac- 
cepted in concurrence. On motion of Alderman 
Viles, the Board proceeded to an election. Com- 
mittee—Aldermen Viles and Woolley. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

Joseph A. Tucker had 11 

John P. Hilton 12 

George H. Wyman 12 

Messrs. Tucker, Hilton and Wyman were elect- 
ed on the part of the Board. Certificate sent 
down. 

Managers of the Old South Association. A re- 
port came down nominating, with certificate of 
the election of, Hugh O'Brien and Harvey N. 
Shepard as Managers of the Old South Associa- 
tion. The report was accepted in concurrence, 
and, on motion of Alderman Breck, the Board 
proceeded to an election. Committee, Aldermen 
Breck and Flynn. Mr. O'Brien had 11 votes and 
Mr. Shepard 12, and they were elected in concur- 
rence. 

Trustees of the Public Library. Alderman 
Tucker submitted a report nominating Alderman 
Hugh O'Brien and Councilman Charles E.Pratt 
for trustees of the Public Library. Accepted, 
and on motion of Alderman Slade the Board pro- 
ceeded to an election. Committee — Aldermen 
Slade, Breck. Alderman O'Brien received 11 votes 
and Mr. Pratt 12, and they were declared elected 
on the part of the Board. Sent down. 

Directors for Public Institutions. Alderman 
Bell submitted a report nominating Alderman 
Clinton Viles and Councilmen Edwin Sibley and 
John Taylor for directors for public institutions. 
Alderman Flynn submitted a minority report rec- 
ommending the election of Councilman Paul H. 
Kendricken in place of Mr. Taylor. Accepted, 
and on motion of Alderman Flynn the Board pro- 
ceeded to an election. Committee— Aldermen 
Flynn, Tucker. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

Clinton Viles 11 

Edwin Sibley 9 

John Taylor 6 

Paul H. Kendricken 9 

Messrs. Viles, Sibley and Kendricken were elect- 
ed on the part of the Board. Sent down. 

Directors of East Boston Ferries. Alderman 
Thorndike submitted a report nominating Alder- 
man C. H. B. Breck and Councilmen Benjamin 
Brintnall and Martin M. Hancock for Directors 
for East Boston Ferries. Accepted, and on mo- 
tion of Alderman Tucker the Board proceeded to 
an election. Committee — Aldermen Whitten and 
Thorndike. Alderman Breck received 11 votes, 
and Councilmen Brintnall and Hancock 12 each, 



and they were elected on the part of the Board 
Sent down. 

DRUGGIST'S MORTAR. 

Alderman Caton submitted a report from the 
Committee on Survey and Inspection of Buildings 
on the part of the Board, on petition of George 
Burwell, for leave to project a druggist's mortar 
at 83 Charter street, that leave be granted on the 
usual conditions. Accepted. 

CITY SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Bell offered an order— That the City 
Surveyor be authorized, with the approval of .the 
Joint Standing Committee on the Surveyor's De- 
partment, to make such purchases of supplies, in- 
struments, drawing materials, and to incur such 
other expenses as' may be necessary for that de- 
partment during the' present municipal year. 
Passed. Sent down. 

" HEARSES TO GO OVER THE FERRIES FREE. 

Alderman Bell offered an order that the Direc- 
tors of East Boston Ferries permit the passage of 
a funeral hearse upon the boats of said ferries 
free of toll. Passed. Sent down. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Slade submitted the following from 
the Committee on Paving: 

Order, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to number and renumber any street, 
court or place, within the city limits, whenever in 
the opinion of said committee the public conven- 
ience will be promoted thereby. Passed. 

Order, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to grant permits to open the streets in 
accordance with the 11th and 12th sections of the 
Revised Ordinances of 1876, relating to streets. 
Passed. 

Order, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to lay cross walks and pave gutters on 
the public streets of the city when deemed ex- 
pedient by the Committee on Paving. Passed. 

Order, that the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to set edgestones and pave sidewalks 
on any portions of the public streets where the 
abutters agree in writing to pay one-half the cost 
thereof. Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to erect fences in front of vacant lots 
on public streets where the public safety requires 
the same. Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets, 
under the direction of the Committee on Paving, 
be authorized to contract from time to time for 
the purchase and sale and exchange of horses, 
the supplies of hay, grain, paving stones, gravel 
and other materials, required for the operations 
of the Paving Department during the present mu- 
nicipal year. Passed. 

Order to pay Charles H. and Francis C. Hersey 
$322 in full compensation for expenses incurred 
in repairing damage done to their machine shop 
on E street and Dove street, South Boston, by 
the raising of the grades of said streets by the 
city, and for building a bulkhead to protect their 
building against the filling of said streets; said 
sum to be charged to the appropriation for Pav- 
ing. Passed. 

Order for a permit to Stearns & George to erect 
telegraph posts on Eastern avenue and A stieet, 
from Congress-street Bridge to First street, on the 
usual conditions, and that the Fire Department 
have the right to place the fire-alarm telegraph 
wires on said posts. Passed. 

Order granting permission to Barnes & Dunklee 
to erect two lamp-posts in the sidewalk on Boyl- 
ston street in front of the main entrance to the 
Hotel Brunswick, upon condition that said par- 
ties shall remove said posts when ordered so to do 
by the Board of Aldermen. Passed. 

Order empowering and directing the Superin- 
tendent of Streets to remove without delay all 
structures and things which may hereafter be 
built into or upon the sidewalks of public ways in 
this city, so as to hinder, encumber or endanger 
persons travelling thereon, or which obstruct or 
encumber the way. Passed. 

COMMITTEE ON COUNTY BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Breck— I see by the list that I was ap- 
pointed by the Mayor a member of the Commit- 
tee on County Buildings and Faneuil Hall. I un- 
derstand that there was no authority for the for- 
mation of such a committee. It was not under- 
stood by the Mayor at the time. He understood 



30 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



from what his clerk had told him that there was 
to be such a committee, but it seems that all the 
business such a committee would be required to 
transact comes before the Committee on Public 
Buildings on the part of this Board. I therefore 
respectfully resign from that committee. 

Alderman Flynn— I think the better way would 
be to strike out the ruie which makes the Com- 
mittee on Faneuil Hall and County Buildings 
consist of the members of the Committee on Pui>- 
lic Buildings, or the other members of that com- 
mittee might consider that they ought to do the 
same as the Alderman had done. Unless the rule 
is amended or stricken out, of course it will be 
the duty of the other members of the committee 
to resign. Having been appointed on that com- 
mittee, 1 should wish to resign unless the rule is 
stricken out. 

Alderman Breck— I had learned that the Mayor 
had found out there was a mistake in appointing 
the committee, and I supposed I could do no less 
than resign, as there was no use for the commit- 
tee. I supposed all the other members of the 
committee would do so. 

Alderman Whitten— 1 suppose I must do the 
same thing. The first intimation I had of it was 
when 1 came into the room this afternoon, and 
that it was not a legally appointed committee. 
I was told the committee had no right to exist, 
and therefore I resign. 

Alderman Flynn— I'ask to be excused from serv 
ing on the committee. 

All the members appointed on said committee 
were excused from serving. 

The Chairman appointed the members of the 
Committee on Public Buildings of this Hoard 
members of the Committee on County Buildings, 
in accordance with the rule. 

(ITV KNCINEElt'S T>i:i'A!;i MUUi 1. 

Alderman Woolley offered an order — That the 
City Engineer be authorized,with the approval of 
the Joint Standing Committee on Engineer's De- 
partment, to make such purchases of supplies, in- 
struments and drawing materials, and to incur 
such other expense- , as may be necessary for that 
department dining tbe present municipal year. 
Passed. Sent down. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Alderman Thorndike offered an order— That all 
unsettled claims or other unfinished business re- 
lating to the Church-street, Suffolk-street or 
Northampton-street districts be referred to the 
Committee on Public Lands, with the same pow- 
ers in relation thereto that the committee now 
have in other matters. Passed. Sent down. 

ORDINANCES. 

Alderman Breck offered an order— That in ad- 
dition to the amount heretofore allowed, the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances be authorized to expend the 
sum of $350.00 for printing City Document 119 of 
1879; said sum to be charged to the appropriation 
for Incidentals. Passed. Sent down. 

PUBLIC HUILDlNc-. 

Alderman Slade submitted the following from 
the Committee on Public Buildings: 
Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public 



Buildings, under the direction of the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Publie Buildings, be authorized 
to supply the necessary furniture and cause to be 
made such repairs and cleaning as may be nec- 
essarily needed in the several high, grammar and 
primary schoolhouses; the expense thereof to 
to be charged to the appropriation for School- 
houses, Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, under the direction of the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Buildings, be authorized 
to supply the necessary furniture and cause such 
repairs to be made, and cleaning as may be need- 
ed, upon the police stations and engine houses, to- 
gether with other public buildings as are not 
made by the respective departments using the 
same; the expense to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Public Buildings. 

Severally passed. Sent down. 

9 I LBLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following from 
the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board : 

Reports that leave be granted, on the usual 
conditions, to occupy stables by Thomas Brogie, 
on Tremont street, near Oak square, Ward 25, 
and Thomas M. Stevens, on Spring street, AVa id 
23. Severally accepted. 

NEW COURT lloi -I . 

Alderman Breck offered an order — That his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 
General Court that authority be granted the City 
Council to take land for court houses. Passed. 
ANTE-ROOM OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Alderman Viles offered the following: 

Ordered, That the order passed by this Board, 
Jan. 12, in relation to the ante-room of this cham- 
ber be rescinded and the following be substi 
tuted : 

Ordered, That the City Messenger be and he is 
hereby directed to allow no person or persons in 
side the rail or in the ante-room of the alder- 
manic chamber while the Board is not in session, 
excepting members of the City Government, re- 
porters, or persons on official business) unless in- 
vited by members of the City Government. 

Alderman Viles — That order rescinds the order 
passed by this Hoard last Monday. In a certain 
sense that was more strict, if carried out, than the 
committee wish to have it. Therefore they ask 
that the former order be rescinded and this take 
its place, and it wiil answer all the purposes re- 
quired. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Alderman Flynn the vote by which 

the above order was passed was reconsidered, ami 

on motion of Alderman Viles the order was 

nded bj substituting "Board of Aldermen" 

for "City Government" in the last line, and as 

sided was passed. 

ii irilos FOB REMOVAL <>i \ i I L u. j: A I'll POLE. 

Alderman Walbridge presented the petition of 
the .Mechanics' National Bank for the removal of 
a telegraph post from Dorchester avenue, at their 
building. Referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Adjourned on motion ot Alderman Tucker. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



31 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 39, 1880. 



Regular meeting at 7% P. M., Harvey N. Shep- 
ard, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Reports of city officers. Placed on file. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Order for the Directors of Ferries to permit 
funeral hearses to pass over the ferries free of 
tolls. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to allow the expenditure of S350 addition- 
al for printing City Doc. No. 119, 1879. Passed in 
concurrence. 

Order to refer to the Committee on Public 
Lands all unfinished business relating to the 
Church and Northampton street districts. Passed 
in concurrence. 

Order to supply furniture for public buildings, 
and to make necessary repairs on, and cause to be 
kept in order, the City Hall and the police stations 
and engine houses. Ordered to a second reading. 

Order to supply furniture for and cause to be 
repaired and cleansed the several school buildings. 
Ordered to a second reading. 

Order to purchase supplies, instruments, draw- 
ing materials, aid to incur other necessary ex- 
penses for the City Engineer's Department. Or- 
dered to a second reading. 

Order to make like purchases and incur like ex- 
penses for the City Surveyor's Department. Or- 
dered to a second reading. 

Order to contract for filling all or part of Com- 
monwealth avenue extension, when the owners of 
land, abutting on the extension, shall agree to 
the simultaneous filling of the lands within the 
bounds of Beacon street, West Chester park and 
the Boston & Albany Railroad. Ordered to a sec- 
ond reading. 

Reports nominating and certificates of the elec- 
tion of the following-named officers: 

1. Trustees of the Public Library — Alderman 
Hugh O'Brien and Common Councilman Charles 
E. Pratt. 

2. Directors of East Boston Ferries — Alderman 
C H. B. Breck and Common Councilmen Benja- 
min Brintnall and Martin M. Hancock. 

Severally accepted in concurrence. Elections 
laid over. 

.Directors for Public Institutions. A report 
came down nominating Alderman Clinton Viles 
and Common Councilmen Edwin Sibley and John 
Taylor as Directors for Public institutions. Ap- 
pended to said report is a minority report recom- 
mending the election of Common Councilman 
Paul H. Kendricken in place of Mr. Taylor. 

There also came down a certificate of the elec- 
tion, as such directors, of said Viles, Sibley, and 
Kendricken. 

The report was accepted in concurrence. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4 moved to suspend the 
rule, that the Council might proceed to an elec- 
tion. 

Mr. Parkman of Ward 9 asked if there was any 
more reason for suspending the rule in this case 
than in the others. 

Mr. Bailey said there was no special reason. He 
would as leave move to suspend the rule in the 
other cases as in this. He remembered at the last 
meeting the rule was suspended as soon as the 
committee reported, and the Council proceeded 
to an election. He asked what objection there 
was to suspending the rule in this case. 

Mr. Parkman said he thought it better not to 
suspend the rule, and that members should have 
more time to examine the question. The election 
by the Board of Aldermen has hardly given the 
members time to think about the matter. 

Ths rule was declared suspended. Mr. Devlin 
of Ward 13 doubted the vote. The Council was 
divided— 34 for, 27 against— and the rule was de- 
clared suspended. 

Mr. Devlin said he understood it took a two- 
thirds vote to suspend the rule, and the President 
said the rule requiring a two-thirds vote to sus- 
pend the rule had not yet been adopted. 

An election was ordered. Committee— Messrs. 
Bowker of Ward 16, Austin of Ward 11 and Coe of 
Ward 23. 

On motion of Mr. Parkman of Ward 9, the usual 
recess was taken while the committee were out. 



Whole number of votes 67 

Necessary for a choice 34 

Clinton Viles had 67 

Edwin Sibley 40 

' John Taylor 42 

Paul H. Kendricken , 37 

Messrs. Viles and Sibley were elected in concur- 
rence and Mr. Taylor in non concurrence. Sent 
up. 

Trustees of the City Hospital. A certificate 
came down of the election of Alderman Joseph A. 
Tucker and Councilmen John P. Hilton and 
George H. Wyman as trustees of the City Hospi- 
tal. Placed on file. 

An election was ordered. Committee— Messrs. 
Lauten of Ward 14, Williams of Ward 11, Bigelow 
of Ward 25. 

On motion of Mr. Howard of Ward 4 the usual 
recess was taken while the committee were out. 

Whole number of votes 66 

Necessary for a choice 34 

Alderman Joseph A. Tucker had 65 

Alderman James J. Flynn had 1 

Councilman Thomas H. Devlin had 1 

Councilman George H. Perkins had 3 

Councilman George H ; Wyman had 59 

Councilman John P. Hilton had 62 

Messrs. Tucker, Wyman and Hilton were elect- 
ed in concurrence. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

A communication was received from the trus- 
tees of the Public Library, calling attention to 
the fact that the lease of the room in which the 
South End branch of the Public Library is situ- 
ated expires in May next, and asking for larger 
and more suitable rooms for the branch. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Public Library. Sent 
up. 

POWERS OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 called up the special assign- 
ment for eight o'clock P. M., viz. : 

Order to petition for an act requiring the School 
Committee to confine its expenditures to the ap- 
propriations furnished by the City Council, also 
the report that the order to petition for a law 
transferring to the School Board the charge of 
school expenditures, and for the assessment of a 
separate school tax, ought not to pass. 

The question was upon giving the order report- 
ed by the committee a second reading. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12—1 do not rise, sir, as 
I said the other evening, to oppose this order. 
The proposition which I moved last year was ex- 
actly the reverse of this. It was to set the School 
Committee free from the Common Council. One 
course or the other, it seems to me, should be 
done, but I hope the committee who had charge 
of this matter will favor us with some arguments 
in support of their plan, in order that the public 
may have a chance to see our side of the question. 
There may be no doubt that the School Committee 
is a body specially favored by the public, and I 
have no doubt this measure will be resisted 
by the School Committee. They have from 
the commencement shown a desire to 
magnify their powers. Therefore I hope 
the committee will see fit to give us some reasons 
for this new departure. I have no doubt they 
have made out a case, and I hope they will be good 
enough to give us some argument so as to make 
out a case to go before our constituents and show 
why we have voted for this change. 

The order was passed to a second reading, read 
a second time, and passed. 

Mr. Coe moved a reconsideration hoping it 
would not prevail. Lost. Sent up. 

The report that Mr. Whitmore's order ought not 
to pass was accepted. Seut up. 

THE RECENT FIRE IN FEDERAL AND DEVONSHIRE 

STREETS. 

In accord an ce/with a notice filed with the Clerk, 
Mr. Plimpton moved a reconsideration of the 
vote on the passage of the order calling for a re- 
port from the Inspector of Buildings on the con- 
struction of the buildings burned on Dec. 28 and 
29, 1879, and the cause of the extension of the fire 
to other buildings than the one In which the fire 
originated. 

Mr. Plimpton— After the last meeting I filed a 
notice of a motion tor the reconsideration of this 
vote, for the reason that as both the subjects men- 
tioned in the order are referred to the tnspector 
of Buildings we shall not be likely to get the in- 
formation asked for in the last clause, because 
that belongs to the Fire Commissioners. I there- 
fore moved a reconsideration for the purpose of 
offering two orders. 



32 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Mr. Plimpton offered the following as a substi- 
tute : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Survey and 
Inspection of Buildings be requested to report to 
the City Council whether the condition of the 
buildings on Federal and Devonshire streets, 
burned Dec. 28th and 29th, complied at that time 
in all particulars with the requirements of the 
building laws; also whether any changes in the 
requirements < t the building laws are desirable. 

The substitute was adopted, and the order as 
amended was passed. Sunt up. 

Mr. Plimpton offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Board of Fire Commissioners 
be requested to report to the City Council in ref- 
erence to the recent fire on Federal and Devon- 
shire streets, Dec. 28 and 2D, particularly stating 
tte cause in their opinion of the extension of the 
lire to other buildings than the one in which it 
originated. 

Passed. [Later in the session the order was in 
part rescinded and changed.] 

( A MlilUDGE HRIDOES. 

The annual report (City Doc. No. 12) of the Com- 
missioner on West Boston, Canal and Prison 
Point bridges for 1879 was received. 

The draws have been opened as follows : West 
Boston Bridge, 1669; Canal, 3632; Prison Point, 
627. The expenses of each bridge have i.een — 
West Boston, SM03.43; Canal, |2241.08; Prison 
Point Bridge, $1034,76. Salarj of commissioner, 
printing and advertising, $503.60. Total expense, 
$6182.87. 

Statement of amount and kind of freight 
which passed through Canal Bridge during the 
year 1879: 

Coal 196.212 tons 

Gravel 28 

Stone 46,984 " 

Iron 900 " 

Hay 68J " 

Lumber 2,122,000 ft. B. M. 

Brick 2,002,000 ft. B. M. 

WopcI 9,964 lords 

Posts '40 pieces 

Piles " 

Lime '1 bbls. 

Sent up. 

CITY SfKVEYOR's mi' MM MINT. 

The animal report of the City Surveyor (City 
Doc. 11 was received and sent up. 
The amount expended during the year has been: 

Expenses of City Proper, South and East 

Boson and Cliai'lestown $18,639.49 

Expenses of the Boxburv branch office for 

three months [964.09 

Expenses of the Dorchester branch office.. 2,978.00 
l'.\iienses of the West Koxlmiv branch 

effice 2,636.38 

Expenses of the Brighton branch office (for 

three months) 565.40 

Total expenditure from appropriation for 
surveying fur 1879 .. g25.783.36 

The following is a classification of the expenses: 

City proper, South and Fast Boston and 
Cliai'lestown, $18,839.49; Koxlmrv branch office, 
09; Dorchester branch office, $2978.00; Vest 
Roxbur 18; Brighton, $565.46. 

There were 24 employes Jan. 1, a reduction of 7 
from same time in 1879. 

The work performed at this office, at the pres- 
ent time, embraces the whole City, with the ex- 
ception of Dorchester and West Koxbury; and all 
the current work in the latter district is done 
from the central office, at City Hall. 

The special surveys of the districts where the 
branch offices have been located having been 
completed, their further continuance has not 
been found necessary, as the current work in 
those districts can be performed from the central 
office at City Hall. This requires, however, an 
additional force at the central office. The branch 
offices at ltoxhury and Brighton were discontin- 
ued on the 1st of May last. The office at West 
Roxbury will be discontinued within a few 
months, or as soon as the general plan of that 
district is completed. This will leave only one 
branch Office, the one at Dorchester: and* if it 
were not for want of room, the central otli. 
ing already crowded, I should also recommend 
the removal of that office to City Hall. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

A request was received from the School Com- 
mittee tor better accommodations for the evening 
schools. Referred to the Committee on Public 
Instruction. Sent up. 



PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

A petition was received from Francesca Cav- 
agnaro for compensation for personal injuries re- 
ceived on Fleet street. 

By Mr. Swift of Ward 9— Petition of Catherine 
Murray, to be paid for personal injuries received 
on Washington street, near Bennet. 

Petition of Edward Jelly, to be paid for per- 
sonal injuries received by the defective condition 
of Beverly street. 

Petition of Rose Farreil, to be paid for personal 
injuries received on Sumner street, East Boston. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Claims. 
Sent up. 

By Mr. Hollis of Ward 25— Petition of Henry 
Baldwin and other citizens of Ward'25, that the 
city purchase the triangular lot of land situated 
between Rockland street and Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir, and south of Engine House No. 29, and set 
the same aside as a public square. Referred to 
the Committee on Common. Sent up. 

By Mr. Coe of Ward 23- Petition of L. L. Will- 
cutt and other residents of Ward 23, that the city 
improve and beautify the land on the summit of 
Mt. Bellevue. Referred to the Committee on 
Common. Sent up. 

By Mr. Bigelow of Ward 25— Petition of O. H. 
Marion and others ol Ward 25, that two or more 
wagons of the Health Department be placed in 
Ward 25. Referred to the Joint Committee on 
Health. Sent up. 

By Mr. Bigelow of Ward 25— Petition of S. S. 
Leonard and others of Ward 25 that Western 
avenue may lie constructed to its width as laid 
out by the street Commissioners, macadamized 
and put in proper condition for public travel. 
Sent up. 

TIM 9TEBS "I MT. HOPE CEMIIIUY. 

Mr. Fisher ol Ward 24 submitted a report nomi- 
nating Alderman F. G. Walbridge and Council- 
men A. F. Lauten and A. S. Brown as Trustees of 
Mt. Hope Cemetery. Accepted. Seat up. 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES. 

Mr. Coe submitted a report from the Committee 
on Finance on the report ol Committee on Public 
Instruction in regard to providing sii8,i33 to 
meet the expenses for schools during the remain- 
der of the financial year, with an order — That the 
Auditor oi Accounts lie and he hereby is author- 
ized to transfer from the appropriation for 
Court Rooms, Criminal Business, to that for 
School Instructor-, $62,383; for salaries of offi- 
cers of the School Committee. $3750: and for 
school expenses, School Committee, 5jil3,807; also 
from the reserved fund to the appropriation for 
School Expenses, School Committee, ^38,133. 

Mr. Coe— It is necessary that this order should 
be passed tonight, and 1 move a suspension of the 
rule. It is necessary that the School Committee 
should know what to depend upon, and also to 
furnish them with the means to pay their janitors, 
who are without pay, and cannot receive any un- 
til the passage of this order. 

The rule was suspended, and the order was read 
a second time and passed — yeas ti3, nays 0. 

Till; CONTESTED sill IN \\ \i:n SIXTEEN. 

Mr. Plimpton of Ward 21 submitted the follow 
ing: 

The Committee on Elections, to whom was re- 
ferred the petition of John J. Scollard, contest- 
ing the seat of John E. Bowker, a member of the 
Common Council from Ward 16, having given the 
case a careful investigation, beg leave to report 

as follow- : 

The petitioner has been granted a hearing, and 
has been afforded ample opportunity to give his 
reasons for contesting the right of the sitting 
member to his seat, and the facts, as they have 
been presented to the committee, may be briefly 

Stated as follows : 

From the returns made by the election officers 
at the recent election, it appeared that John £. 
Bowker was duly chosen a member of the Com- 
mon Council from Ward 16. Subsequently a 
petition, signed by ten citizens of the ward, "was 
filed in the office of the City Clerk, asking for a 
recount of the votes lor members of the Common 
Council, on the ground that the petitioners had 
reason to believe that the returns were erroneous 
and that the votes had been incorrectly counted. 
In compliance with the request of the petitioners, 
the votes wire recounted by the Committee on 
Elections of the Aldermen, and although there- 
count varied somewhat from the original return, 
the result was the same as declared by the elec- 
tion officers. The committee reported in effect 



JANUARY 22, 1880 



33 



that the returns had been correctly made, and 
recommended that the persons declared elected 
be so notified by the City Clerk. 

The petitioner now comes forward and asks that 
the ballots may be again recounted, for the sole 
reason, as it appeared at tue hearing, that the 
plurality of the sitting member was very small, 
the recount showing him to be elected by one 
vote. The petitioner's counsel stated before the 
committee that they had no charges to make con- 
cerning the correctness of the election returns or 
the recount, nor had they succeeded in procuring 
evidence to show that either canvassing board 
•was guilty of negligence or unfairness in the per- 
formance of their dutits, and it may be fairly 
presumed that such evidence does not exist. 

As stated above, the petitioner asks for a second 
recount merely because Mr. Bowker, as the case 
stands at present, appears to be elected by a plu- 
rality of one vote, and also, as was stated, in the 
hope that a third canvass of the votes cast may 
change the result that has been declared by the 
election officers and confirmed by the Hoard of 
Aldermen. 

The committee can see no adequate reason for 
granting the request of the petitioner; they con- 
sider that it would be unwise to establish such a 
precedent, and they therefore respectfully recom- 
mend that the petitioner have leave to withdraw. 
Charles H. Plimpton. 
John E. Blakemore. 
William F. Wharton. 

The undersigned, members of the Committee on 
Elections, respectfully inform you that they are 
unable to agree with the majority in the matter 
of the petition of John J. Scollard, and beg leave 
to submit the following as their opinion: 

Tha petition which was referred to your com- 
mittee was from John J. Scollard, in which he ^>et 
forth his desire to contest the seat now occupied 
by John E. Bowker from Ward 16, for several 
reasons, among which was the following: "That 
the recount of votes as made by the Board of 
Aldermen was incorrect, and more votes were 
cast for John J. Scollard than for John E. Bow- 
ker." Both parties were represented by counsel. 
It appeared that Bowker had but one vote more 
than Scollard, and that there was a variance be- 
tween the counts made by the ward officers and 
the Board of Aldermen. Mr. Scollard's counsel 
asKed that the ballots be recounted, but this 
your committee refused to do. There can be no 
doubt that the best evidence that could be intro- 
duced, as to the fact that the recount as made by 
the Board of Aldermen was incorrect, and that 
Scollard had received more votes than Bowker, 
as alleged in the petition, was the ballots cast in 
said ward, and the recounting of the same by 
your committee. Scollard had a right to have 
said ballots retained by the City Clerk (acts of 
1876, chap. 188, sec. 2), and we believe for the pur- 
pose of presenting them to the committee and 
asking for a recount, where the closeness of the 
vote, as in this case, warrants such request. 
Much stress has been laid on the fact that these 
ballots had been counted by the Board of Alder- 
men and therefore should not be recounted 
by your committee. The Board of Alder- 
men and Common Council are separate 
and distinct bodies (City Charter, sec. 34), 
and each has authority to decide upon all 
questions relative to the qualifications, elections, 
and returns of its own members (City Charter, 
sec. 24). We believe that this Council should be 
satisfied who is elected from Ward 16 by a re- 
count made by its own committee of the votes 
cast, that such recount will not consume more 
time than your committee should willingly give 
to this matter, that no person or persons can be 
injured by such recount, but that the refusal to 
recount said ballots may cause great injury to 
your petitioner and to the citizens of Ward 16 
generally, and that said ballots ought, in justice 
to all concerned, be recounted. 

We therefore respectfully recommend the pas- 
sage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Elections is 
hereby instructed to recount the ballots cast in 
Ward 16 at the last municipal election for mem- 
bers of the Common Council, and report the re- 
sult of such recount without unreasonable delay. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. P. J. Ward. 
Thomas J. Denney. 

Mr. Ward of Ward 7 moved to substitute the 
minority report for chat of the majority. 

Mr. Ward— I regret exceedingly my inability to 
as;ree with the majority of the committee, and for 



several reasons. First — I wished a unanimity of 
feeling between the members of the committee: 
Secondly — I am favorable to Mr. Bowker, and 
would not wish to lose his association during the 
coming year. But, Mr. President, I believed it 
was my duty to express the opinion which 
was expressed in the views of the mi- 
nority of the committee, or what is some- 
times called the minority report of the committee. 
It appears, Mr. President, in this case that the 
plurality of the sitting member is but one vote; 
that the results vary more or less in the counts as 
made by the Board of Aldermen and ward offi- 
cers. I submit that on other occasions we have 
assigned the smallness of the plurality as a rea- 
son for granting the prayer of a petitioner for a 
recount after the vo'tes had been recounted by 
another committee; and in the successful con- 
tested election cases which appear in the Munici- 
pal Register for 1879 I find that in January, 1867, 
they vacated the seat of a member returned as 
elected from Ward 10, because by the recount of 
the original ballots cast in said ward it appeared 
that another person was chosen; chat in January, 
1870, they vacated the seat of a gentleman from 
Ward 13 for the same reason ; on Jan. 5, 1871, a re- 
count of votes was had with the same result; in 
January, 1872, a recount of votes by the Commit- 
tee on Elections was had with the same result; in 
January, 1874, a recount was had with the same 
result; on Jan. 14, 1875, another recount was 
had with the same result; on Jan. 4, 1877, 
a recount was had with the same result; and on 
Jan. 10, 1878, a recount occurred with the same re- 
sult. But it is claimed in this case that these 
ballots were counted by the Board of Aldermen, 
and therefore the committee of the Council 
should not recount the ballots. I was somewhat 
surprised when the chairman of the Committee 
on Elections informed me that the Board of Alder- 
men had never recounted the ballots cast for 
Councilmen previous to the law passed in 1878. I 
believe they acted under the opinion given by the 
City Clerk that they had no authority. However 
that may be, at a hasty glance at the law previ- 
ous to that, it is my opinion that they had that 
authority, even if they did not exercise it. But if 
they had no authority previous to 1878, there is 
nothing in the act of 1878, that I can see, giving 
that authority. However, these votes were re- 
counted by the Board of Aldermen. There is no 
doubt about that. They were recounted at a 
time when the Aldermen were recounting the bal- 
lots cast for Mayor, Aldermen, School Committee, 
and for Councilmen in several wards from which 
petitions were presented for recount of votes for 
members of the Council, among which was Ward 
7, which I represent. In this case I can see noth- 
ing whatever to be lost by a recount of the votes. 
There is no doubt the Council has a right to re- 
count those ballots, and I believe it is 'their duty 
to do so. This, I think, is the last tribunal to 
which the petitioners can appeal. Here we should 
settle all disputes as to the returns and qualifica- 
tions of our own members. Whatever the Board 
of Aldermen may do it has nothing to do with our 
action. I believe that in this case the closeness of 
the vote, where there is but one vote difference, 
entitles the petitioner to a recount. There is 
doubt in his mind, and even if it is only to clear 
that doubt, I believe the ballot should be recount- 
ed. I am not myself wholly convinced that 
the return is entirely correct. That the 
return may be incorrect is not at all 
impossible, and I therefore believe that as 
this petitioner has asked the Council that the bal- 
lots be recounted, and believing that if Mr. Bow- 
ker, the sitting member, had received a plurality 
of the votes cast at the municipal election, those 
votes are still retained by the City Clerk, and x\lr. 
Bowker can lose nothing by a recount. If, on the 
contrary, he has not received a. plurality of votes, 
great injustice would be done the citizens of Ward 
16. 1 therefore believe that in this case the Coun- 
cil should vote to accept the minority report and 
instruct your committee to recount the ballots. I 
can see no reason why the ballots should not be 
recounted. I therefore ask that the Council give 
this matter due consideration, and if no reasons 
sufficient to them are advanced why these ballots 
should not be recounted and why for the first 
time a petitioner should be refused a recount, and 
if they are satisfied that the ballots should be re- 
counted, that they will vote in favor of the accept- 
ance of the minority report. 

Mr. Plimpton of Ward 21— The majority of the 
Committee on Elections have no wish or desire 
to shirk any responsibility or duty which the 



34, 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Council may choose to impose upon them. Hut 
to their minds there is no reason why these bal- 
lot.-- should be distui bed. The petitioner has had 
his legal remedy, a careful recount by the Hoard 
of Aldermen, 'i'hey do not pretend to doubt the 
accuracy of that recount. They only say the dif- 
ference "is xi small— only one vote— it is suffi- 
cient to cause another recount. At the first hear- 
ing' the counsel lor the petitioner asked for more 
time to procure evidence why there should be a 
recount. The committee gave him six days— all 
the tune he asked— and at the end of six days he 
came in, and did not produce any evidence," but 
11 sted his case solely upon the small majority re- 
ceived by Mr. Howker. Now my own opinion is 
that there is great danger of .these stickers tailing 
oil ballots when they are" handled, and the 
first recount is likely to be the more cor- 
rect. 11 l he committee Should recount them and 
find stickers oil t he ballots and in that way Mr. 
Scollaid should be given one or two majority, my 
own opinion is that the first recount by the Hoard 
Of Aldermen would be more correct. The opin- 
ion ol the committee Is that the matter should 
rest where it is. 

Mi. \\ barton of Ward 11— 1 rise to say I entirely 
agree with the gentleman who has just closed, 
but 1 wish also t" state to this Dody the law upon 
this subjei t In this case the petitioner had three 
causes tor contesting the seat ol tbepresent in- 
cumbent. Those causes were, First— Ttiat the re- 
count of the votes as made by the Alderman was 
incorrect, and more votes were cast for John J. 
Scollaid than for John 1>. iiowker; Second — That 
\o<es were cast and counted than there were 
names checked on the voting list; and, Third— that 
the names ol men wei e checked on the voting list 
who did not vote, and that this was Sufficient to 
change the result of the election. The committee 
took great care to give the petioner a very thor- 
ough hearing. As was alleged by the chairman of 
the committee, we gave the petioner as much as 
six days t<> show evidence in support of his 
petition. The petitioner appeared before the com- 
mittee finally with counsel, and the present incum- 
bent wa> also allowed counsel. The petitioner 
waived the last two causes lor contesting the seat 

and based his claim entirely upon the first cause, 
that the recount of the Aldermen was not eor- 
it might be said, perhaps, and very justly, 
that the cause thus' alleged in the petition did not 
call properly and strictly for a recount; but the 
committee were of the opinion that it necessarily 
followed, in order to Satisfy this eau-e, as SO al- 

i, that B determination should he reae bed as to 
whether or not a recount should be granted. Now, 
Mr. President, it is perfect!] well settled law that 
to upset the returns made by the proper officers 
it is oecessarj to show that those returns and the 
count whuh those returns represent was made 
either fraudulently or else that there was some 
mistake by the returning officers. That is the law 
all over the country, not only in the courts, but 
in every legislative assembly 1 have been able 
to find anything about, after a somewhat care- 
ful research on this question. Therefore, the 
question m this case as presented to us is simply 
whet in i oi not we should prant a recount of the 
ballot. Now, by the law of IST-i and '7t> the power 
oi recounting the ballots was given to the board 
oi Aldermen or a committee appointed by them, 
which i> usually their Committee on Flections, 
under certain conditions. In this case the peti- 
tioner took advantage of and fulfilled those con- 
ditions, and had a recount by the proper commit- 
tee ol the Board oi Aldermen. Therefore, if there 
ever was a recount to which the presumption of 
the law is applicable— -the presumption that it is 

ind and proper return until upset by evi- 
dence ol 1 1 and or mistake— this certainly is such 
a return. Ordinarily, the returns are made .y one 
body— the body which originally counts the vofes. 
In this case the return is made by the body which 
recounted the votes. II there is a case to which the 
rub- of law applies, this is such a one. When 
the petitioner came before us he said he had no 
evidence to produce ezoept the return oi the 
ward officers, and he also undertook to argue that 

then- was sufficient evidence ot a mistake to tip- 
Set this i eturn, 1 roni the fact that the plurality of 
the incumbent, was bo small. Now, Mr. President, 
it could not be said for a moment, and bo gentle- 
man in . his house would argue, that the mere 
fact alone that a member oi this body was re- 
turned by a plurality ot one, should lender the re- 
turns subject to a suspicion ol mistake or fraud. 
That, it seems to me, is impossible It is such a 
simple question that 1 shall not attempt to dwell 



longer upon it. The very statement of it refutes 
the idea that it is open to such a construction. 
Now we come to the Blight evidence offered by 
the petitioner, and that was the returns of the 
ward officers. It strikes me as a very anomalous 
demand that it should be insisted upon lor 
a moment, that when a statute requires 
that the return of the Board of Aldermen alter 
a recount should be the true return, that we 
should then undertake to accept a paper in evi- 
dence to show that that return was made under 
a mistake— which is in itscll corrected by tin re- 
turn. In other words, the return of I he Hoard of 
Aldermen, under the statute, is to be taken as the 
true return of the ward. Now the petitioner in 
this case has undertaken to upset that return by 
introducing a paper of which that return is a cor- 
rection, made by a board properly chosen and pro- 
nounced as the proper board bylaw to determine 
such a question. Hut the committee did not un- 
dertake to exclude this ward return on that ground. 
They accepted it as evidence which may be very 
anomalous, at any rate they accepted it. And what 
did it prove? It proved simply that the returns 
as made upon that paper were different 
in every respect from the returns as 
evinced by the aldei manic paper. Now, Mr. 
President, to contend for a moment that 
such a paper as that should cause any suspi- 
cion that the returns of the Hoard of Al- 
dermen were made by mistake, or fraudu- 
lently made, is to suppose that every corrected 
edition of a paper, pamphlet or book, is pre- 
sumed to be incorrect if It differs in many respects 
from the original copy. That must be the result 
of accepting this piece of paper as governing the 
aldcrmanic return. The mere fact that there is a 
difference, and a great deal ol difference, between 
the original ward returns, and the aldermanic re- 
turns simply shows to my mind that the Aldermen 
have been extremely careful and have gone into 
every single item very carefully indeed and recti- 
fied all previous incoriectuesses. That is all that 
will show. Now, Mr. President, it we accept the 
petition in this case, if we adopt the amendment 
of the gentleman from Ward 7, we practically say 
that in every single case where a petitioner prays 
for a recount, and alleges no cause w hatever 
to upset the original return or count, 
we practically say that in such cases the 
petitioner should always have a recount of 
Ballots. That is a precedent which has never ex- 
isted, so far as I am aware, in any legislative 
assembly or in the courts. 1 have taken some 
care to look up the cases, particularly the election 
cases in this State, and in none of them have 

I found any such precedent, and if the Council 
adopt such a precedent, they will find that they 
stand alone. The committee heard the counsel on 
both sides, but as there was no evidence intro- 
duced except as stated, the committee did not 
think it worth while to have the arguments of 
counsel printed and submitted to the Council, as 
they were fully aware that if the Council should 
desire to do so, they could have the counsel ap- 
pear before them and argue the ease anew. 

Mr. Wlntmore of Ward 12—1 think that this 
case which is now before the Council is in some 
respects the most important matter which we 
havi had yet to di-euss, and I hope to make it ap- 
peal so \ cry clearly. The matter on the laeeot 
it is very clear. In Ward lti a man is elected by a 
plurality of one vote. The opponent conies and 
desires this body not to seat him, but to allow 
those ballots to be scrutinized anew by the only 
tribunal to which he can appeal, and that is this 
Council. Now before 1 touch the matter of the 
Returning Hoard, which has so befogged this 
question, I want to ask this Council to say wheth- 
er they would not consider it a reasonable peti- 
tion for a man to come here and say that on the 
face ol those returns, out of hundreds of votes, I 
am cast out by one vote only, and 1 ask to have 
them recounted. Anybody who looks over the 
records ol this body," the Hoard of Aldermen or 
the Legislature, will find that in many cases peti- 
tions for recounts were granted where the con- 
testant was lack 1 ng a hundred votes of an elec- 
tion. If any man thought that justice bad not 
been done to him, he has come here and peti- 
tioned for a recount. 1 can put my hand 
on cases where a petitioner was defeat- 
ed by a hundred and fifty or two hundred 
votes" at the election, and yet as a matter of 
fair play, the Council has been willing to let them 
be recounted. 1 start wi h this proposition, that 

II Mr. scollaid came here with the ward returns 
and said, I am only one behind, and 1 think there 



J AN U ARY 22 



1880 



35 



is a fair possibility that there was a mistake, I 
do not think it is preposterous, as was stated by 
Mr. Wharton, to grant it; but that it is preposter- 
ous not to grant it. Anybody familiar with the 
reports of the votes in the various precincts, and 
with the reports made by the Board of Aldermen 
for the last two years, knows that frequent- 
ly the recount will vary three or four votes 
from the return. The fact is, our ward officers 
are not of the calibre that they should be. This 
case is complicated by the fact of a recount by 
the Aldermen. Now, I wish you to understand 
the nature of that recount. It is no intention of 
the law of 1874 or 1876 to make the Board of 
Aldermen the judge of the qualifications of the 
members of this body or any other body whose re- 
turns pass through their hands. You remember a 
year or two ago they tried to sit in judgment on 
the returns of the election of members of Con- 
gress, and they were told mighty soon by a gentle- 
man from Georgia that the Board of Aldermen 
of the city of Atlanta should not govern the elec- 
tion of members of the House of Representatives, 
and that the Board of Aldermen of Boston should 
not do it; that they were the judges of their own 
election, and whoever touched these ballots they 
proposed to count them for themselves. Now, 
Mr. President, I regard it as a matter of privilege 
on the part of this Council to be the judges of its 
own members. What is this statute of 1876? It 
provides that whenever ten persons in the ward, 
not necessarily or presumably the person who has 
been defeated in the election, but any ten citi- 
zens, can come in and say that they don't think 
the ward returns are right; they ask the Board 
of Aldermen to make a prima facie evidence 
of who is to have the certificate of election. 
The object is that when we come here on the first 
Monday in January there shall be no question 
as to who have a certificate of election, so that we 
can organize; and after that the right to hold that 
certificate belongs to this body and no one else 
to determine. Now in this case the Board of Al- 
dermen recounted the vote, and gave the certifi- 
cate to a person elected by the ward returns. 
Now, suppose their recount varied ot e vote 
from the ward returns, and gave it to Mr. 
Scollard, would it be unreasonable for Mr. Bow- 
ker to come before this Council and contest 
that seat? This is a contested election in reality. 
Now, the case happens here for the first 
time in this body; since the law of 1876 we have 
had two contested elections, one in 1877 and one 
in 1878. I believe also in neither case did it hap- 
pen that there was a count by the Board of 
Aldermen. But when the gentleman came up 
here and claimed that the votes ought to be re- 
counted, they were allowed to be recounted. Now 
I want to cali your attention to this matter. I hold 
in my hand House document No. 29 of the House 
of Representatives of Massachusetts of last Jan- 
uary. In that case Dr. Bowker contested the 
seat held by George H. Bond of the Fourteenth 
Suffolk District. He went there and made ex- 
actly the same plea which Mr. Scollard does now. 
He says, "I have been counted out by the Board 
of Aldermen, and I desire that this committee — 
and in his case the majority of the committee was 
against him— I desire that the House of Repre- 
sentatives will be the judges of its own elections, 
and I desire a recount of those ballots by a com- 
mittee of the House." As in this case, I will not 
say for the same reasons, the majority reported 
leave to withdraw. But the minority submitted a 
report which set forth that the Returning Board 
system was bad, that the law had not been com- 
plied with in that case, as it has not been com- 
plied with in the case of Mr. Bowker of Ward 16. 
I understand that exception had a great deal of 
influence with the House. The fact was that in- 
stead of the Board of Aldermen or their commit- 
tee discharging that duty, they brought in Tom, 
Dick and Harry to help them out; they 
had the City Clerk and his assistant, 
and clerks were detailed from the Regis- 
trars of Voters and the City Clerk's department, 
and those men went in and were clothed with the 
full powers which the committee had. The com- 
mittee at the State House claimed that the Board 
of Aldermen should have done their own work, 
that they were selected to do it, although perhaps 
they might have called in more competent men 
than themselves. This recount was made by the 
committee after three or four days'service, late at 
night, by one Alderman and one clerk detailed 
from the office of the Registrars of Voters. Now, 
I say beyond that, and I understand it is in evi- 
dence and can be produced, that the main dis- 



crepancy they found was in Precinct 3, and that 
this Alderman and clerk made a discrepancy of 
ten from what the ward officers found. 1 am al-o 
informed that the clerk in that precinct was an 
accomplished and professional bookkeeper, a per- 
son entirely qualified to make that return. I 
understand that that gentleman is willing to 
make his affidavit, or go before the commit- 
tee and testify that he believes his return 
was correct, and that Mr. Scollard had ten more 
votes in that precinct. I say there is reason why 
this Council should defend its own rights, and if 
we have a returning board to grant certificates of 
election, we are not to have a returning board 
forced upon us to judge of the qualifications of 
members of this body. One point Mr. Wharton 
made was that the petitioner put in three grounds 
upon which he asked for a recount and two of 
them were abandoned. Well, sir, I do not know 
his counsel, I was not at the hearing and I have 
no more interest in the case than any other mem- 
ber of this body. But I can see at a glance that 
one of the grounds upon which he claimed a re- 
count was that there was a discrepancy between 
the check list and the total ballots cast. Now, 
sir, unless a recount is made he cannot substanti- 
ate that claim. I am also told that if the case is 
gone into he is prepared to prove that one 
man's name is upon the check list who did 
not vote, although it is perfectly true 
that under the rule of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, it should be also shown that the 
person voting on that name voted for the sitting 
member, and not for the contestant. Still, is it 
not sufficient to justify the Council in looking 
over the ballot and having a recount ? I do not 
propose to detain the Council any longer. I have 
not the faintest idea how the recount will turn; 
but it seems to me it is a matter which will plague 
the inventors if you reject the principle I am now 
advocating. The time may come — and I utter this 
warning, because I see it has just taken place in 
the State of Maine — when the majority of only one 
in a party may find it desirable to override the 
minority by counting in one or two other mem- 
bers of their own party. If the aidermanic re- 
count is to stand, and you abandon your privilege 
of being judges of the election of your 
own members, you can never tell where you 
may be hereafter. I have already stated I have 
no interest in this matter more than other 
members. I have been led to bring this matter 
forward and express my views because two years 
ago this Council unwisely refused to entertain a 
petition in regard to the election of a member. I 
hope my good friend from Ward 10 [Mr. Wheeler] 
will excuse me for referring to his case. But when 
he took his seat in 1878 his election was contested 
on the ground of a technical error in the use of 
the voting list. There was no other legal candidate 
running against him, and the Committee on Elec- 
tion made a report of leave to withdraw. I was 
interested in the subject and inquired of one of the 
prominent lawyers in the council, a Republican, 
why he allowed such a report to stand, and he 
said the reason was nobody in the Council raised 
any objeetion to it. He knew as a lawyer that the 
Council was doing wrong, and he sat by feeling it 
to be none of his duty to call the attention of the 
Council to it. I venture to say that he was cor- 
rect in his view of the law, and 1 am now correct 
in my view of the law, because ten days after that 
report of leave to withdraw there was a death in 
the Board of Aldermen, and prominent gentlemen 
in this city felt it was not safe to have an election 
for Alderman under the old law. I happened to be 
interested in drafting the new law, and helped to 
carry it up to the Legislature. There it was intro- 
duced under a suspension of the rule and passed, 
in order that a new Alderman might be legally 
elected. I then made up my mind that if any man 
came here with the faintest show of incorrectness 
in the return, I would stand by the losing side. I 
believe it is the duty of this Council, whenever 
there is a reasonable doubt, to throw the doubt in 
favor of the contestants. If a niau is elected, it 
cannot hurt him to have the ballots recounted 
over and over again. The chairman of the com- 
mittee has made allusion to the fact that the re- 
coil nting may knock off some pasters from the 
ticket. I would ask him whether Republican paste 
is any weaker than Democratic paste. I think 
they are all furnished from the same box, 
and all likely to stand. But beyond that, as it 
affects the intent of the voter, I want you to ask 
from your own experience if there were a hun- 
dred stickers cast, whether every one of those 
stickers was put in intentionally, whether every 



3C> 



OOMM.ON COUNOIL, 



man who pasted a ballot did it intentionally and 
knowingly? The tact Is, when you come down to 
it, it is hard to distinguish what the intent 
Of the majority was. 1 think that argument 
of Mr. Plimpton can be dismissed as going into 
too floe a region for us to follow. The only thing 
we can do is to stand by the law. I don't care 
whether there are lun acore of pasters in the box; 
it is one of the results ot using pasters in accord- 
ance With the law. We are to look at the law and 
the machinery tcir its execution. 1 ben ihe Coun- 
cil to remember that this is the only tribunal to 
which the petitioner can appeal, ana that every 
thing said about the Board "I Aldermen does not 
affect this question. Mere is a man coming within 
one vote ot an election, who presents in a per- 
fectly proper and respectful manner a petition 
to have 'he ballots verified by a committee 
of this body, and not by an Alderman and a clerk, 
Mr. Swift of Ward 9— It is perfectly clear that 
this Council has the right to examine and pass 
upon the returns <>l the election of its own mem- 
bers. But it Is equally clear that this is not a case 
where we ought to exercise that power. This 
vote was tirst returned i>y the ward officers, then 
a recount was petitioned for ami given, as the 
law provide-, and made by the Hoard of Alder- 
men, or by their committee. The gentleman from 
Ward 12 hies to throw discredit upon this re- 
count by calling the committee of the Board of 
Aldermen a returning board. Hut they are a 
board which has been generally respected in their 
counting oi votes, and i do not think the gentle- 
man from Ward 12 would he willing to make 
any charge- oi Improper action against the 
gentlemen who made the recount. If he 
were asked the question directly I think he would 
say that he would trust those gentlemen, and 
I certainly think the members of this Council 
would lee'l BO. The law provides that When a 
recount is made by the Hoard of Aldermen it 
shall be taken a- the true count. It does not pre- 
vent ns from looking into the < lection ol our own 
members when we wish to. We have a right to 
do that. Hut it does certainly make the return of 
the Hoard of Aldeiinen Strong evidence of the 

truth ol ihe tacts reported, and unless some evi- 
dence is brought on the other side to impeach 
that return, there is no reason why it should he 
disturbed. If there were any reason for suspect- 
ing hand or mistake, wc ought to go into this 
matter. Hut the petitioner, after bt ine allowed 
time to produce evidence, has laiied to produce a 
single piece of evidence either ol fraud or mistake 
in this election. The ward returns which he 
brings are. of course, different from tne amended 
returns, and are more favorable to Mr. Bowker 
than the amended returns. The ward returns 
give Mr. bowker thirteen plurality, and the 
amended returns give him one. I don't see that 
this impeaches his standing. The gentleman 
from Ward 12 stated there was evidence m exist- 
en. i' affecting the validity of the count. If there 
was, why (lid not the petitioner produce it? 
He had six days to produce evidence, and 
employed able counsel, it there was Buch evi- 
dence j the petitioner and his counsel did not 
choose to produce it, and I think we are justified 
in the conclusion that no evidence upon which 
the Council might properly rely was m existence. 
The onl\ real ground on which he claims we 
should recount the vote is. there was only one plu- 
rality. Now 1 cannot see that that is any ground at 
all. A plurality of one is as good as a plurality ot a 
thousand, flic only reason given for this recount 
- lo me to be a reason why we should not 
i t it. It is perfectly true that pasters do fall 
oil ballots. La8t year when the returns for ballots 
for (lie School Committee were recounted, there 
w ei e found to be a great number id pasteis Fallen 
i nd it was impossible to say where they came 

from, ot course the smaller the pluralit] the more 

eh. line there is of the result being atleeted 

by the i ailing oil' of pasters. The pasters are as 
likely to fall off from one side as the other, but 
still "the liai ility to error i«no less great. Though 
the error may I c on one side or t lie other the chan- 
ces are the i ew count will not be as accurate as the 
count formerly taken. I'm these reasons, it seems 
to tne we ought to refuse t he petitioners recount in 
tbiscase. If there were any grounds to suspect 
fraud, or grounds upon which we could reasona- 
bly sii-pi i t a mistake, I should be in favor of 
granting a petition lor a recount: but I d< n't see 

that there i- the slightest evidence or thai the peti- 
tioner has made out a piima facie case. That be- 
ing the tact, it seems to me every motive of expe- 



diency and propriety should urge us to refuse his 
petition. 

Mr. Wheeler— 1 ask the privilege of making a 
single statement, as reference has been made 
by the gentleman from Ward 12 to my elec- 
tion case, and he intimated that the Council did 
not deal quite fairly in the matter. It is due to 
the Council of Ists to deny that statement in rela- 
tion to whatever unfairness was done in that mat- 
ter. As the gentleman admits, the ground upon 
which the election was contested was a very 
technical one. Hut the matter was referred to 
the Committee on Elections, who gave every 
opportunity to the petitioner to establish 
his ground. Able counsel were employed, 
and acted in his behalf, but it appeared 
so clear to my own mind what the law 
was upon the subject, that no effort was made, 
and hardly a statement was made either by my- 
self or any one on my behalf, at the hearing. 
The opinion of the City "Solicit or was taken, and 
the Committee on Elections reported unanimous- 
ly in favor ol giving the petitioner leave to with- 
draw. 

Mr. Christal of W'ard 8—1 am not anxious to en- 
ter into this contest from Ward Id. but am anx- 
ious that justice he done to every citizen; and for 
that reason I am in favor of having this go hack 
to the committee for a recount. I cai.not im- 
agine for a moment when we have a Committee 
on I. lections that they have not power to recount 
ballots. If they have* not the power, what is the 
use of having a committee? The whole trouble 
seems to be, there is more law than justice, which 
is usually the case with people who get into the 
hands ot lawyers. Why cannot this man have the 
same privileges as others? 1 move that both re- 
ports lie recommitted, with instructions to re- 
count the ballots. 

Mr. Plimpton — The gentleman from Ward 12 
remarked that Republican and Democratic paste 
are pretty much the same. A gentleman near me 
remarked that the gentleman from Ward 12 was 
probably authontv on the subject, as he was fa- 
miliar with both kinds. 

Mr. Whitmore — 1 have hut just one remark to 
make in this case. It is not attempted to decide 
upon this case. The question before the Council 
is whether they are willing, on the ground of fair 
play, or on the" broader ground of respect to their 
own rights, to order this recount? For myself, I 
can see no good reason why any gentleman can 
object to having the ballots recounted. No mat- 
ter whether the majority is one or a hundred. It 
will be all the better after a recount, or after fifty 
times counting. If you reject this appeal, you re- 
ject the only appeal the petitioner can make. The 
contestant has no rights anywhere else. We do 
not say he was thrown out wronglully, but we be- 
lieve there are good reasons for asking for a re- 
count. 

Mr. Lauten of Ward 14— One statement was 
made by the gentleman from Ward 12 which I 
should iike to understand before it goes to the 
world at large, and that is that the Board of Al- 
dermen had assistance in counting the votes. I 
don't know how the gentleman knows it, hut if 
there is any one here who know sit, I should like 
to have him make a statement how he knows it. 

Mr. Christal's motion to recommit, with in- 
structions, was declared lost. Mr. Christal 
doubted the vote and called for the yeas and 
nays, which were declared not ordered. Mr. 
Whitmore doubted the vote and called for a 
rising vote. 

Mr. Whitmore was excused from acting as 
teller for the first division, and Mr. Cronin was 
appointed in his place. 

The yeas and nays were ordered— 19 for, 35 
against. 

The roll was called, and the motion of Mr. 
Christal to recommit, with instructions, was lost 

\ eis 27, nays 38: 

Yeas — Messrs. Anthony, Hrintnall, Christal, 
Cronin, Denney, Devine, Devlin, C. F. Doherty, 
Donahue, lai well, 1'itzpatriek, Folan, Hart, Ken- 
dricken, Kidney, lane. McLaughlin, McNamara, 
Morrison, Murphy, O'Dowd, Rogers. Sibley, D. J. 
Sweeney, Sr., Sweetser, W aid, Whitmore— 27. 

Nays— Messrs. Austin, Bailey, Barry, Bigelow, 
Blakcmore, Hrimhecom, Hrown, Child, H. B. 
Clapp, II. Clapp, Coe, J. Doherty, Dudley, Fisher, 
Freeman, Hancock, Healy, Hilton, Hollis, How- 
ard, Lauten, Lovell, Maguire, Nason, Perkins, 
Plimpton, Pratt, l*rav, H. N. .Sawyer, N. Sawyer, 
Swilt, Taylor, Tucker, Viles, Welch, Wharton, 
Wheeler, Williams— 38. 



J A N ITAR Y 22 



1880 



37 



Absent or not voting— Messrs. Bowker, Green- 
ough, Hosley, Parkman, D. J. Sweeney, Jr., Wy- 
man— 6. 

Mr. Parkman of Ward 9 was excused from 
voting on the question, previous to the roll call, 
in both cases, he having paired with Mr. Sweeney, 
Jr , of Ward 2. 

The question next came upon substituting the 
minority fortne majority report. 

On motion of Mr. Ward the yeas and nays were 
ordered. 

The Council rejected the motion to substitute — 
yeas 24, nays 41: 

Yeas— Messrs. Christal, Cronin, Denney, Devine, 
Devlin, C. F. Doherty, Donahoe, Farwell, Fitz- 
patrick, Folan, Hart, Kendricken, Kidney, Lane, 
McLaughlin, McNamara, Morrison, Murphy, 
O'Dowd, Rogers, Daniel J. Sweeney, Sr., Sweet- 
ser, Ward, Whitmore— 24. 

Nays — Messrs. Anthony, Austin, Bailey, Barry, 
Bigelow, Blakeniore, Brimbeeom, Brintnall, 
Brown; Child, H. B. Clapp, H. Clapp, Coe, J. 
Doherty, Dudley, Fisher, Freeman, Hancock, 
Healv, Hilton, Hollis, Howard, Lanten, Lovell, 
Maguire, Nason, Perkins, Plimpton, Pratt, Pray, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Sibley, Swift, Taylor, 
Tucker, Viles, Welch, Wharton, Wheeler, Will- 
iams — 41. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Bowker, Green- 
ough, Hosley, Parkman, Daniel J. Sweeney, Jr., 
Wyman — 6. 

The report of the coirmittee (leave to withdraw) 
was accepted. 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Kidney of Ward 6 submitted the following, 
which, with the accompanying documents, was 
ordered printed and specially assigned to next 
Thursday at 8 P.M.: 

The Committee on Assessors' Department, to 
whom was referred among the unfinished busi- 
ness of last year the ordinance to amend an ordi- 
nance in relation to the assessment and collection 
of taxes, having carefully considered the subject, 
beg leave to submit thefollow'ng report: The pro- 
posed amendment provides for the election of 
principal Assessors for a term of three years, in- 
stead of for one year, as at present. It is the 
opinion of the committee that i& some respects 
the change is desirable. They appreciate the im- 
portance of retaining experienced officers on the 
Board of Principal Assessors, where experience is 
of the greatest value. Under the present system 
of annual elections, the policy has always been to 
retain the oldest and most experienced officers, 
and changes have seldom been made, and then 
only for good reasons. The effect of the proposed 
amendment is merely toprovide by ordinance for 
continuing a well-established custom. |The 
committee believe that if by doing so 
any improvement can be made in the 
Assessors' Department, the experiment (for they 
regard the proposed change in the light of ex- 
periment) should be tried, and they, therefore, 
recommend that the amendment be adopted. 
The committee have tlso considered the expe- 
diency of electing the First Assistant Assessors 
for a term of years, and believe that it is 
not expedient to do so. These officers 
are not required or expected to possess that 
thorough knowledge of all matters relating to 
taxation which is essential in a Principal Assess- 
or. On the contrary, it requires but comparative- 
ly little experience to qualify a practical person 
to till the position satisfactorily, and it has been 
the custom to reelect such persons to the position. 
One great advantage of a yearly tenure of office is 
that, if by chance an incompetent person is elect- 
ed, he can be dropped at the end of a year and his 
place filled by a more capable person, which 
could not be done if the officers were 
elected for a term of years. The com- 
mittee believe that it is desirable to fur- 
ther amend the ordinance so as to give the prin- 
cipal Assessors more control over the Second As- 
sistants, and submit an amendment providing 
that the Second Assistants shall perform such d.i- 
ties as may be required of them by the principal 
Assessors. The committee respectfully recom- 
mend the passage of the accompanying ordi- 
nance, covering the proposed amendments. In 
other respects its provisions conform to those of 
the present ordinance. Respectfully submitted. 

Charles H. B Breck. 

George E. Bell. 

George L. Thorndike. 

John a. Kidney. 

John Taylor. 

P. James Magcire. 



Minority Keport. 
The undersigned, members of the Committee 
on Assessors Department, beg leave to say 
that, while they fully concur with the recom- 
mendations of the majority of the committee 
in relation to electing the Principal Assessors 
for a term of years, they also believe that the 
same principle should be applied to the First As- 
sistant Assessors, and for similar reasons. These 
officers perform duties which require not only ex- 
perience, but also great judgment and knowledge 
of real and personal property. They are expected 
to be thoroughly conversant with real estate in 
all parts of the city, and to be capable of forming 
an intelligent opinion in regard to the changes in 
values which take place from year to year. The 
principal Assessors must necessarily rely upon 
them in a great measure, and It is important that 
they should be capable and discreet men, in 
whom the public will have confidence, and whose 
opinions will be respected. The undersigned be- 
lieve that if the term of the First Assistant Asses- 
sors is increased to three years, men of ability 
will seek the position, who would not be willing to 
devote the necessary time merely to hold it for 
one year, and that the longer term will be an addi- 
tional incentive to the incumbents to fit themselves 
for tne duties of the position. The undersigned 
further recommend that the Second Assistant As- 
sessors be nominated by the Board of Principal 
Assessors and First Assistant Assessors. Among 
the reasons in favor of this change, they assert 
that the board of Assessors are better qualified 
to select competent men for the position 
than a committee of the City Council, 
which is liable to change from year to year, and 
which is apt to be subject to local influences. 
The undersigned, therefore, respectfully recom- 
mend the passage of the accompanying ordi- 
nance, which embodies their recommendations. 

George H. Wyman. 

Dudley R. Child. 

Minority of Committee. 

RULES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 submitted the following 
(City Doc. 14): 

The Committee on Rules and Orders of the 
Common Council, to whom was referred certain 
proposed amendments to the Rules and Orders, 
having considered the subject, beg leave to sub- 
mit the following report: 

The committee have carefully examined the 
proposed amendments, and selected such as in 
their opinion it is desirable to adopt, either 
wholly or in part. They do not deem it expedient 
to recommend the adoption of amendniems which 
merely change the phraseology of existing rules, 
unless some manifest advantage is to be gained 
thereby. Neither dj they consider it advisable to 
adopt rules relating to "questions that are of in- 
frequent occurrence in the transaction of the 
business of the Council. They are of the opinion 
that it would be impracticable to frame a code of 
rules which would cover all questions of parlia- 
mentary law, and believe that it is sufficient to 
provide for the ordinary business of the body, 
trusting to the judgment and discretion of the 
presiding officer, ana the rules of parliamentary 
practice, to meet the extraordinary questions 
which occasionally rise. 

The committee believe that the rules relating to 
the care of the Council Chamber and adjoining 
rooms should not be incorporated into the rules 
which relate to legislative business, and they are 
therefore offered as a separate oraer. 

The committee recommend tne adoption of the 
following amendments: 

Amend section 5 by adding the following: 

All vacancies upon committees shall be filled in 
the manner of original appointment; and mem- 
bers so appointed shall take rank according to the 
date of their appointment. 

Amend section 18, as printed on page 58 of the 
Municipal Register for 1879, by inserting before 
the word "entitled," in the fourth line, the word 
"originally"; and by striking out the words "be- 
fore such vote." 

Amend section 35 by striking out the word 
"standing." 

Amend section C6, as printed on page 67 of the 
Municipal Register for 1879, by inserting after the 
word "meeting," in the third line, the words 
"either immediately after the announcement of 
such vote, or under'the seventh clause of section 
41." Also, by inserting after the word "member," 
in the third "line, the words "who voted with the 
majority." Also, by inserting after the word 



38 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



"meeting," in the fifth line, the words "except 
the final meeting of the year, or that preceding 
any adjournment of the Council for over two 
week-. " 

Amend section 08 to read as follows: 

"All officers receiving any compensation from 
the city oi Boston, who are primarily elected by 
the City Council, shall he chosen in this branch 
by ballot. All confirmations of the Mayor's nomi- 
nations shall be by a yea-and-nay ballot." 

After section "O'insert a new rule, to read as fol- 
lows: 

"Section 71. All bills tor refreshments or car- 
riage hire, incurred by the Common Council, the 
standing committees of the Common Council not 
having charge oi any appropriation, or individual 
member- of The Common Council while engaged 
in the discharge of official duty, shall give the 
names of the persons inclining the same; and the 
President of the Common council is authorized to 
approve such bills after they have been approved 
by the committee or certified to by the members 
inclining the same; provided, that the President 
shall not approve any such bill unless it is pre- 
sented to him before" the end of the month next 
succeeding that within which the expense covered 
by BUCfa bill was incurred." 

The committee herewith submit a copy of the 
amended Rules and Orders, the amendments be- 
ing printed in italics. 

Edwih Sibley, i 

Daniel J. 9v beney, ; Committee. 

llKNKV F. COE, ) 

Mr. Sibley moved that the subject be specially 
assigned to the next meeting of the Council, but 
gave way to allow Mr. Swift the floor. 

Blr. Swift— I see on the printed list one of the 
amendments introduced at the last meeting 
which has not been adopted by the committee; 
but which seems to me a very useful one. It is 
the one to go at the end of rule 66 in regard 
to reconsideration, and 1 have been reminded 
that this meets a case which occurred to me iu 
the Council last year. An ordinance was before 

the Council, and a proposed amendment was re- 
jected. Alter that the ordinance itself was spe- 
cially assigned to the next meeting ol the Council 
at eight o'clock. A motion to reconsider the vote 
rejecting the amendment was filed with the clerk. 
Under t ne existing rules the notice of motion to 
reconsider and rlie subject may come up at a dif- 
ferent time. It the assignment is called for be- 
fore the motion for consideration is reached ill 
regular order, and if the ordinance to which the 
amendment is rejected is passed or defeated, the 
amendment would he no longer in order, so that 
the reconsideration could not be practically voted 
on. It is equally so if the assignment oomes up 
after the reconsideration, so that unless some ex- 
pedient ia resorted to at the time to bring the 
matter- together, the opportunity will not he af- 
forded of acting on the reconsideration. Of 
course it can be done by specially assign- 
ing the general subject to the time 
when the reconsideration is in order, but 
that is a clumsy arrangement. It seems 
to me this amendment can do no harm, and 
this i- a conditio.! of thing- winch is likely to oc- 
cur at any time. The amendment is only to add 
these words, so that when there is a motion to re- 
consider an amendment, it may come up and be 
discussed at the same time as the matter to 
which the amendment is offered, l oiler this as 
an amendment to the rule, and ask that it be 
specially assigned to the same time as the con- 
sideration oi the report. 

Mr. Swift's amendment is as follows. To add at 
the end of Rule 66: 

"Whenever a matter has been specially as- 
signed, a notice as above specified, to reconsider 
any vote affecting the provisions of such ordi- 
nance, order or resolution, shall be considered 
whenever such special assignment takes effect." 

Mr. Whitmore— In the hasty examination which 
I have been able to give of the report of the com- 
mittee, as near as I can judge they have adopted 
about three-fourths of the suggestions which I 
submitted to the Council before. There are 
about twelve lines in regard to other rules which, 
for some mysterious reason, the committee have 
not reported. I offer those as an amendment in 
order that they may be considered at the same 
time. I do this' because this document is out of 
print. They are matters of form, and I move that 
they be considered at the same time with the re- 

Eort. When they come to be looked into it will 
e seen that they are not likely to create much 
discussion. 



The amendments offered by Mr. Whitmore are 
as follows: 

"6. Substitute for Rules 45 and 68 the follow- 
ing: 

"All officers receiving any compensation from 
the city of Boston and county of Suffolk who are 
primarily elected by the City Council, shall be 
chosen in this branch by ballot. Nominations of 
such officers shall oe made by nominating com- 
mittees, whose reports shall lie over for one week 
before action is taken thereon. All confirma- 
tions of the Mayor's nominations shall be by a 
yea and nay ballot. 

7. Rule 46. Add as follows: "No motion shall 
require to be seconded, except an appeal from the 
decision of the Chair." 

8. In Rule 4'J, line 6, for the word- "to postpone 
to a day certain," substitute the words "to spe- 
cially assign to s. certain hour." 

Also strike out the last four lines, and insert a 
new rule as follow-: 

"These several motions shall have precedence 
in the order in which they stand arranged. They 
shall not be applied to each other, except that an 
amendment may be amended, and the time speci- 
fied for a special assignment may be amended. A 
substitute for a bill or a section of a bill shall be 
deemed an amendment. The previous question 
may be demanded upon an amendment, and that 
motion shall be decided without debate." 

11. For rule 53 substitute a new draft, as fol- 
lows: "Debate on the (-all for the previous ques- 
tions, or on a motion to lay on the table, or to 
take from the table, shall not exceed ten minutes. 
In such debate, however, the merits of the main 
question shall not be discussed.'' 

12. Add to rule 62, as follows: "The question 
shall be put as follows: Shall the decision of the 
Chair stand as the judgment of the Council '." 
And it shall be deemed to be decided in the affirm- 
ative unless a majority of the votes given are to 
the contrary.'' 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5—1 have no objection to 
these matters, although in regard to the matter of 
reconsideration 1 see no trouble with the rule as 
it now exists. A member moves a reconsidera- 
tion, the tune come- to consider the general ques- 
tion and he loses the force ol his motion. Well, 
it is dead. At the same time, if that member 
asks for a suspension of the rules I think it should 
be granted. When the rule is suspeuded he re- 
ceives all the benefit he would have if he had 
acted upon it at first. Then the gentleman from 
Ward I Bays his amendments are not of much 
importance. That is precisely the conclusion the 
committee came to. I hope those amendments 
will be looked over and that the motion to assign 
will be carried. 

Mr. Sibley's motion to assign prevailed, and the 
amendments of Mr. Swift and Mr. Whittemore 
were specially assigned to the same hour. 

ARNOLD ARBORE'J I M. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21 submitted the following: 
The Joint Special Committee on Public Parks, 
to whom was referred among the unfinished busi- 
ness of last year the communication oi the Park 
Commissioners in relation to the Arnold Arbore- 
tum, having considered the subject, beg leave to 
submit the following report: It will be remem- 
bered that, in their fourth annual report, the 
Park Commissioners represented that they were 
of the opinion that the authorities of Har- 
vard University were ready to cooperate 
with the city in opening the Arboretum 
to the public. An order was passed requesting 
the commissioners to confer with the corporation 
of Harvard College in relation to the subject, and 
report thereon to the City Council. The commis- 
sioners reported, under date of November 14, 
1879. that having conferred with the representa- 
tives of the college, they believed it would be for 
the interest of the city to petition the General 
Court for such legislation as would enable the 
city to acquire the right to use the arboretum 
for park purposes, and at the same time not inter- 
fere with the terms of the Arnold bequest. The 
Arnold Arboretum is situated on what is known 
as the Bussey estate, in West Roxbury, and com- 
prises about 120 acres. It is easily accessible, be- 
ing within five minutes' walk of the Forest Hills 
station on the Bostoi & Providence Railroad. It 
is the result of a bequest by the late James Ar- 
nold of Providence, for the purpose of encourag- 
ing the study of arboriculture. By the terms of the 
bequest the money was to accumulate until it 
amounted to $150,000, and the interest on that sum 
was then to be expended for the purposes named. 



JANUARY 22, 1880. 



39 



No part of the sum can be expended for any other 
purposes than the cultivation of trees and shrubs. 
It is now proposed that, in order to give the pub- 
lic an opportunity to enjoy the use of this beauti- 
ful estate, the city shai) enter into an agreement 
with Harvard University, by which the property 
shall be taken under the park act, for a 
nominal sum, say one dollar, and then 
to lease to the University, also for a 
nominal sum, such portions as may not 
be required tor driveways, etc. By this arrange- 
ment the university will continue the improve- 
ment and embellishment of the estate, defraying 
the cost from the income of the bequest, while 
the only expense to the city will be the cost 
of such driveways and paths as it may deem 
expedient to lay out from time to time for 
the convenience of the public, unless it 
should hereafter be thought desirable to pur- 
chase additional land not connected with the ar- 
boretum, for the purpose of carrying out the 
park scheme. The committee agree with the 
Park Commissioners, "that as no such extraordi- 
nary opportunity was ever before within the 
reach of a city," and they would recommend that 
early action ue taken to carry out the plan sug- 
gested by the commissioners. To that end they 
respectfully recommend the passage of the fol- 
lowing order. 

For the committee. 

Charles E. Pratt. 

Ordered, That his honor the Mayor be requested 
to petition the General Court, at its present ses- 
sion, for the passage of an act authorizing the 
city of Boston to enter into an agreement with 
the president and fellows of Harvard University 
by which the Arnold Arboretum, sd called, may 
be opened to the public. 

The question was upon giving the order a sec- 
ond reading. 

Mr. Pratt— I think the report states the facts in 
the case so well that scarcely anything need be 
said in favor of the order; but for the benefit of 
those who were not here last year I will merely 
say, in brief, that in opening any negotiation it is 
for the city of Boston not only to have the gift of 
a park, but the gift of its care afterwards, with- 
out the expense of superintendence. Such a de- 
sirable arrangement does not occur to a city more 
than once in a century. The land contains about 
120 acres very near the Forest Hill Cemetery, on 
the Hoston & Providence Railroad, is finely lo- 
cated, beautiful and picturesque in its surface, 
and is to be under the special care and training 
and adornment of Harvard College, with a very 
intelligent direction in regard to the bearing of 
trees of such variety and elegance as can be made 
to grow iu this climate. That is the end sought. 
Every one will see if such an arrangement can be 
given to the public for the study of arboriculture, 
it will he very desirable. The order does not ask 
for the outlay of a cent, or for parting with a par- 
ticle of the power thq City Council has, but mere- 
ly requests the Mayor to petition for power to 
make such an arrangement if the city shall here- 
after see fit. 

Mr. Wheeler — Has any estimate been made 
what the probable cost will be to the city, pro- 
vided the proposed contract should be made with 
the college? 

Mr. Pratt— The details of the plan have no 
been worked out so far as I am aware. This land 
now lies bounded on three sides by streets adja- 
cent to what is part of the Bussey estate. Jt is 
not necessary that the city spend anything. We 
merely request the Legislature to give us power 
to do something; and when we have that power 
will be the time to consider whether it is wise to 
do it. It seems to me we should have the power 
to make the lease of the land under certain condi- 
tions in return for the land. The amount to be 
expended would be limited to what is necessary 
to lay out driveways through the land, and such 
paths as might be necessary *'or the public to 
have the benefit of the use of the grounds. The 
city would go as far in that direction as it should 
think wise. I don't imagine the expense could be 
very heavy. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 
Sent up. 

TOPICS IN THE MAYOR'S ADDRESS. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 submitted a report from the 
joint special committee to report what disposi- 
tion should be made of the various topics in the 
Mayor's address, recommending the passage of 
the" following: 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address 



as relates to water be referred to the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Water. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to parks be referred to the Joint Special Commit- 
tee on Public Parks. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to public schools be referred to the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Instruction. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the Public Library be referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Public Library. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to public institutions be referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Public Institutions. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the City Hospital be referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on City Hospital. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the registration of vital statistics be referred 
to the Joint Standing Committee on City Regis- 
trar's Department. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to inspection of buildings be referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the Fire Department be referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Fire Department. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the Police Department he referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Police. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the Assessors' Department be referred to the 
Joint Standing Committee on Assessors' Depart- 
ment. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the Inspector of Milk be referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Health. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the city charter be referred to a joint special 
committee to consist of two Aldermen and three 
members of the Common Council. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to celebrating the 250th anniversary of the set- 
tlement of Boston be referred to a joint special 
committee to consist of two Aldermen and three 
members of the Common Council, and that said 
committee be requested to consider and report 
in what manner it is expedient to celebrate the 
occasion. 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address 
as relates to a new Court House be referred to the 
Special Committee of the Board of Aldermen on 
the subject of a new Court House. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to public records be referred to the Standing 
Committee of the Board of Aldermen on County 
Accounts. 

The question was upon the passage of the or- 
der. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12—1 think there must 
have been an oversight on the part of the com- 
mittee in regard to so much of the Mayor's ad- 
dress as refers to a new Court House. Instead of irs 
being referred to the committee of the Board of 
Aldermen, I would move as an amendment that it 
be re I erred to the Joint Standing Committee on 
Ordinances. I am happy to state that the entire 
joint committee seems to be in harmony in regard 
to the general subject, and this report would 
seem to be an unnecessary abandonment by this 
Council of any possible right it will have. I think 
gentlemen on the committee will agree with me, 
that we have a strong case, and rather than make 
any waiver of our rights, instead of referring it 
to the special committee of the Board of Alder- 
men, it should be referred to the Joint Standing 
Committee on Ordinances. In the second place, 
in reference to the celebration of the 250th anni- 
versary of the settlement of Boston, I desire 
to know if it is to be presumed tha". this commit- 
tee will report back such an order as will call for 
the appointment of a large committee to take 
charge of the celebration, or whether this com- 
mittee will take charge of it. I think the com- 
mittee is too small, and should consist of eight 
members of the Council with such as the Board of 
Aldermen may join. Very tew persons realize 
how large a celebration will be called for at that 
date. It is probable it will be much larger than a 
Fourth of July celebration. I see that in the pro- 
ceedings of 1830, on the two hundredth anniver- 
sary, Mayor Quincy recommended the appoint- 
ment of a committee, which was clone, and after- 
wards a large committee was appointed to tTke 
charge ot the celebration. It is a long time since 
we have had such a celebration take place, and we 
may have a large celebration and have the inili- 



40 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



tary out. I would move that it be referred to a 
committee of eight on the part of the Council. 

Mr. Wheeler— I should like a division of the 
question. The Committee en Judiciary have ex- 
amined into the question submitted to thein and, 
as has already been stated, my associates will 
agree with what the gentleman has said. I 
think the Council should not bind themselves to 
the action proposed by the report until they have 
Some report from the Judiciary Committee. At 
present, my own view of a propef disposition of 
the report would be to refer it to the Committee 
on Ordinances. I am not very particular about 
that exact disposition Of it, but would urge strong- 
ly that the action proposed by the report be not 
taken tonight, that we bind ourselves to nothing 
until Borne further information can be given. It 
is very important that the members should all un- 
derstand the question as to the rights of the Com- 
mon Council in I his matter Of Mie Court House. 

Mr. Coe called attention to the phraseology of 
the order in regard to the celebration of the 250th 

anniversary, that It was for a committee to report 
as to how the event shall be celebrated. He 
thought that alter the report a larger committee 
would be appointed. In regard to the Court 
House, he agreed th it the Council should be rep- 
resented on any committee charged with the se- 
lection of a Bite or the expenditure of money. 

.Mr. Whit more withdrew bis amendment in re- 
gard to tin celebration of the 250th anniversary. 

The orders reported by the committee were sev- 
erally- passed, with the exception of the one in re- 
gard to the Court, House, which, on motion of Mr. 
Coe, was laid upon the table. 

I \ Mf.'s m w OF BOSTON'. 

Mr. Coe submitted a report from the Joint Com- 
mittee on Public Library, that the order to print 
beliotypes of Lamb's map of the first division of 

lands 'in I lost on, and to dispose of them by sale or 
otherwise, ought to pass. Report accepted and 
said order passed. A motion to reconsider by Mr. 
Whitmore, hoping it would not prevail, was lost. 
Sent up. 

i ROSSINGB. 
Mr. Pary Of Ward 6 submitted a report from 
the Joint Committee on Health on the order in 
regard to the cleaning of street crossings— That 

on account of the unprecedented inch tuenc\ ol 

the weather it is impossible to keep the crossings 
as clean as in former years, I hat 1 he supei intend- 
ent is doing everything that he can, and that the 
crossings will be kept as dean ad possible. Ac- 
cepted. Sent up. 

[( E DBPABTH • 

Mr. Kidney submitted aTeport 1 'rum the Joint 
Committee on Police on the request of the Police 
Commissioners for authority to pay pensioners 
from the appropriation for Police, recommending 
the ] if an order— That the Board of Police 

Commissioners be and they are hereby authorized 
to expend from the appropriation for Police, dur- 
ing the remaini I Ion ol the present financial 
year, an amount necessary to pay the persons 
who are or may be entitled to receive pensions 
from said department, under the provisions of 
chap. 244 of the acts of 18T8 and chap. 97 of the 
acts of 1879. 

The order was passed to a second reading, and 
on motion of Mr. Kidney the rule was suspended, 
the order read id time and passed. Amo- 

tion to reconsider by Mr. Kidney hoping it would 
not prevail, was lost. Sent up. 

( iiaiwian Si BOOLHi II 
Mr. Lovetl of Ward 1 offered an order— That the 
Committee on Public Buildings be requested to 
consider and report on the expediency of repair- 
ing the Chapman School hOUSO, Passed. Sentup. 

3TrpKRINTENT)ENT OF BTBEETS. 

Mr. Maguire of Ward 19 off cred an order— That 
the: Committee on Ordinances consider the expe- 
diency of repealing ot causing to be enforced the 
portion of the ordinance relating to streets, pro- 
viding that the Superintendent of Streets shall 
keep a record of all his proceedings and a set of 
ks in which shall i>c entered under appropriate 
heads the receipts and expenditures in his depart- 
ment, with the names of all parties who have fur- 
nished mateiials, and of all workmen, and the 
amount paid to each individual, and make a quar- 
terly report thereof to the City Council. 

Read twice and passed. 

Tin: CONTRACT svstk.M. 
Mr. Maguire ol Ward 19 offered an order— That 
the Committee on Ordinances inquire and report 



as to the expediency of providing by ordinance 
that in all future advertisements for proposals 
for work to be done for th€ city under contract, 
It shall be expressly stated that no bids will be 
entertained unless from citizens of this Common- 
wealth; and in case no suitable proposals are 
made by sue 1 ! citizens, then the parties having 
the awarding of the contracts may advertise tor 

Proposals from any one, whether a citizen of this 
Bate or not: all contractors to be bound to em- 
ploy none but permanent residents ol Boston, 
unless in cases where specially skilled workmen 
are required, and such parties cannot be found 
in this City; the parties awarding the contracts to 
be the jiul 

The order was declared rejected on the question 
of giving it a second reading. Mr. Maguire 
doubted the vote, called for a division, and the 
Council was divided. 

Mr. Whitmore said debate was in order, and 
called attention to the fact that tins was merely a 
reference to the committee which he believed to 
be right. 

Mr. Coe asked it Mr. Whitmore was in order in 
speaking while the President was Bolving a doubt. 

The President said he was not. Mr. Whitmore 
said that if it was worth while he should dispute 
that proposition, but that he had got through 
with his remarks. 

The Council was divided. The order was passed 
to a second reading — 28 tor, 24 against — was read 
a secoiui time and put upon its passage, 

Mr. Parkman moved to amend by requiring the 
committee to report what additional assistance 
would be required in the city Clerk's office to 
carry out the provisions of that order. Adopted, 
and subsequently amended at the suggestion of 
Mr. Christal, accepted by Mr. Parkman, by 
unanimous consent, that the committee also re- 
port the additional expense of carrying out the 
order. 

Mr. Lauten of Ward 14 thought this was too 
much of a good thing altogether, and moved to 
lay it, upon the table. 

Mr. Maguire said he hael been asked to olfer 
the order. Many persons outside elesire. it. He 
did nut know that it was legally correct, but de- 
sited to h ivi' it referred to the committee to con- 
sider it. Parties outside are clamorous for it. 
He did not know that he would favor it, but 
wanted it considered. 

Mr. Lauten withdrew his motion. 

The order was declared passed. Mr. Bailey of 
Ward 4 doubted the vote, the Council was divided 
—34 for, 'JO against —anil the oreler was passed. 

Mr. Plimpton ol Ward 21 moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the vote accepting the report of the Com- 
mittee on Elections, hoping it would not prevail. 
Lost. Sent up. 

THE RECENT FIRE. 

Mr. Lauten of Ward 14 offered an order— That 
so much of the order, passed on this date, as re- 
quests the' Committee on the Survey and Inspec- 
tion of Buildings to reptirt to the City Council on 
the construction of the' buildings burned in this 
city on the 28th and 2!ith of December last, and 
whether any change in the building laws is desir- 
able, be rescinded, and in lieu thereof, the In- 
spector of Buildings be directed to submit such 
report. 

Mr. Lauten— I desire that this order of inquiry 
should go in in proper shape. It is due to the In- 
spector of Buildings that it should go direct to 
bun and not through his committee. The other 
part of the order goes to the Fire Commissioners 
without sending it to the committee. The in- 
spector is an officer established by statute, and 
this courtesy is due to him. 

The order was passed. 

IiK.i URATION DAY. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 17 offered an order— That 
there be allowed and paid to the commander of 
each peist ol the Grand Army e>f the Republic lo- 
cated in Boston the sum of 9200, to be used in de- 
fraying the expenses of Decoration Day, or in as- 
sisting the families of deceased or disabled sol- 
diers and sailors, the expense to be charged to 
the appropriation for Incidentals. 

Ordered to a second reading, and laid over. 

PLANK WALK. 

Mr. Donahoe of Ward 15 offered an order— That 
the Committee on Paving of the Board of Alder- 
men lie requested to restore the plank sidewalks 
formerly located on Dorchester avenue between 
the Old "Colony Railroad and Dorchester avenue. 

Sent up. 



JANUARY 2 2, 1880 



41 



Mr. Whitmore desired to know if such an order 
could be entertained upon a subject with which 
the Council had nothing to do, and raised the 
point that it should be in the form of a resolve 
expressive of the opinion of the Council. 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. 

Mr. Welch of Ward 7 offered an order — That 
Feb. 22 next be granted as a holiday to all persons 
employed by the city, without loss of pay, except 
members of the police, fire and ferry depart- 
ments, and others whose services are absolutely 
required. 

Mr. Farkman asked if Feb. 22 was not a legal 
holiday, and the President said it was not so far 
as he knew. 

On motion of Mr. Parkman the order was laid 
upon the table. 

Mr. Maguire of Ward 19 offered an order— That 
his Honor the Mayor be requested to cause bells 
to be rung and flags to be displayed on Monday, 
Feb. 22, 1880, in commemoration of the birthday 
of George Washington; the expense|attending the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for Inci- 
dentals. 

Mr. Whitmore hoped that would go over also, 
as there had been a great deal of discussion in 
regard to ringing the bells, which had been voted 
a nuisance, and this proposition was a step back- 
ward. He moved to specially assign to the next 
meeting. 

Attention being called to the fact by Mr. Healy 
that the 22d of February came on Sunday, the 
order was amended to read Feb. 23, instead of 22. 

Mr. Lauten thought it would be in order to 
have a committee appointed to find out whether 
the 23d of February was a legal holiday. 

The order was specially assigned to the next 
meeting. 

WORK FOR THE UNEMPLOYED. 

Mr. Maguire of Ward 19 offered an order — That 
the Committee on Ordinances consider the expe- 
diency of providing by ordinance or otherwise 
that all laborers to be employed on public work 
shall be selected in proportion to the number of 
unemployed in each ward; such number of unem- 
ployed to be ascertained by reference to a book 
to be kept by the City Clerk wherein he shall en- 
ter the names of every person desiring employ- 
ment and also add the length of time said party 
has resided in this city, whether married or single, 
with the number of his family (if any), whether 
previously in the employ of the city, and if so, in 
what department, and any other necessary par- 
ticulars; and also to consider the expediency of 
requiring all heads of departments and other par- 
ties employing laborers on city work to select 
their employes from among the names entered in 
said book, if they shall be qualified, and requiring 
the City Clerk to report monthly to the City Gov- 
ernment the names of all persons employed, with 
the wards in which they reside, so that the public 
work may be equitably distributed and not be 
monopolized by a few privileged parties. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Pray of Ward 5 offered an order— That the 
Superintendent of Health be authorized during 
the present municipal year, to make contracts, 
subject to the supervision of the Committee on 
Health, for the purchase of such quantities of hay 
and grain, and for such stock and supplies as his 
department may from time to time require. 
Ordered to a second reading and laid over. 

SHOES FOR POOR SCHOOL CHILDREN. 

Mr. Rogers of Ward 22 offered an order— That 
the Overseers of the Poor be authorized and re- 
quested to furnish to such of our public school 
children as are obliged to stay from school for 
want of proper covering for their feet, suitable 
shoes, that they may be enabled to attend school, 
such shoes to be delivered on presentation of an 
order from their school teacher, and the board to 
be satisfied as to the inability of the parents or 
guardians to provide the same. 

Referred to Committee on Overseers of the 
Poor. Sent up. 

Mr. Plimpton of Ward 21 moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the vote requesting the Fire Commission- 
ers to report in relation to the Federal-street tire , 
hoping it would not prevail. 

Mr. Lauten moved to amend so as to include his 
order in regard to the Inspector of Buildings. 

Mr. Plimpton suggested that the two were sepa- 
rate, and the President said Mr. Lauten could 
make his motion separately. 



Mr. Plimpton's motion to reconsider was lost. 
Sent up. 

Mr. Lauten renewed his motion to reconsider 
the order in regard to the Inspector of Buildings, 
making a report concerning the fire. Lost. 
Sent up. 

Mr. Parkman moved a reconsideration of the 
vote by which the order in regard to the Arnold 
Arboretum was passed, hoping it would not pre- 
vail. Lost. Sent up. 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10 offered an order— That 
his Honor the Mayor be directed to petition the 
General Court at its present session for the pas- 
sage of an act incorporating the City Hospital 
Referred to Joint Committee on Ordinances. 
Sent up. 

BADGES. 

Mr. Maguire offered an order that Messrs. 

be a committee to procure suitable 

badges for such members of the Common Council 
as may apply for the same; the cost of said badges 
not exceeding $5 each, to be charged to the con- 
tingent fund of the Common Council. 

Mr. Maguire said this order had been left on 
his desk, and he supposed it was there to be in- 
troduced. 

Mr. Christal moved to strike out the clause 
limiting the expense to $5; also that the commit- 
tee consist of five members. 

Mr. Whitmore called for a division of the 
question. 

The motion to make the committee five mem- 
bers was lost. 

Mr. Coe asked Mr. Christal for reasons in re- 
gard to not limiting the cost, and Mr. Christal 
said he desired to leave it to the judgment of the 
committee. 

Mr. Ward thought this an important matter 
which should lie over, and moved to lay upon the 
table. Lost. 

Mr. Whitmore suggested that the order would 
go over anyway, and as it generally creates de- 
bate, he hoped it would be allowed to be ordered 
to a second reading, and go over to the next meet- 
ing, when the members are fresh and ready to 
debate it. 

The amendment striking out five dollars was 
lost. The order was passed to a second reading, 
and laid over. 

PUBLIC GARDEN POND. 

Mr. Plimpton offered an order— That the Com- 
mittee on Common and Public Grounds be re- 
quested to cause the pond in the Public Garden 
to be kept in proper condition during the present 
season; the expense attending the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for Common and 
Public Grounds. 

Ordered to a second reading and laid over. 

Mr. Maguire moved a reconsideration of the 
three orders offered by him referring certain 
matters to the Committee on Ordinances. Lost. 
Severally sent up. 

Mr. Wheeler moved a reconsideration of the 
order in regard to City Hospical. Lost. Sent up. 

Mr. Coe moved a reconsideration of the order 
by which certain moneys were passed to the 
credit of the School Board. Lost. Sent up. 

Mr. Coe moved a reconsideration of the order 
referring to appropriate committees topics in the 
Mayor's address. Lost. Sent up. 

INDEX OF THE PROCEEDINGS. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12 offered- an order- 
That the Clerk of Committees be instructed to 
prepare, and to print under the supervision of 
the Joint Standing Committee on Printing, a 
classified index of names and subjects to the 
twelve volumes of the proceedings of the City 
Council (1868 to 1879, inclusive); the expense, not 
to exceed $500, to be charged to the appropriation 
for Incidentals. Ordered to a second reading, 
and laid over. 

NEW COURT HOUSE. 

Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10 offered an order— That 
his Honor the Mayor be directed to protest against 
the passage of an act by the General Court at its 
present session, giving full power and authority 
to three persons to take by purchase or otherwise 
so much land as they may deem necessary, with- 
in the city of Boston, for the purpose of erectin°- 
thereou a Court House. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4 moved to amend Mr. 
Wheeler's order by adding the following: 



4,2 



C OM MON COUNCIL 



"And that his Honor the Mayor ask that author- 
ity be granted the City Council to take lands for 
court house-;. 

Mr. Parkinan hoped that order would go over 
until the next meeting, when the Judiciary Com- 
mittee might report on this question, and he 
moved to specially assign. The motion to assign 
•was declared carried. Mr. Whitmore doubted the 
vote; the Council was divided— 22 for, 22 against 
—and the question came upon giving the order a 
second reading. 

Mr. Wheeler— This act has been submitted to 
the Legislature, is a most extraordinary one, and 
I cannot see how any one can look upon it other- 
wise. It proposes to give three persons power to 
take the land and compel the city of Boston to 
pay the expense-, taking the matter entirely out of 
the hands of both branches of the City Govern- 
nient, and it appears to me no one can have but 
one view upon Uie subject. These three persons 
would have the right to take the most valuable 
land in Boston, and we should be obliged to pay 
the bills. 

Air. Whitmore— The gentleman from Ward 9 
had not the faintest idea of the damage he was 
doing when lie made the motion. I don't under- 
stand the Committee on Judiciary will be likely 
to report at the next meeting. It the gentleman 
understood the effect of that motion, I hope the 
Council will see that this is a proper order to pass 
now. 

Mr. Bailey explained the effect of his amend- 
ment to give the matter in the control of the City 
Council. 

Mr. Heal v thought the matter should lie over 
to be considered with the other order from the 
Committee on the Mayor's Address and the re- 
port of the Judiciary Committee. 

Mr. Parkinan said he fully understood the ef- 
fect of his motion. Members did not understand 
the act, and he did not understand it gave gen- 
eral power to take land, but only to choose a 
site. Something has got to be done about a Court 
House this year. 

Mr. Whitmore read a notice that the Judiciary 
Committee at the State House would give a hear- 
ing on this matter on Wednesday next. 



Mr. Bailey— As I understand the bill it author- 
izes the appointment by the Supreme Court of 
three commissioners who are authorized to select 
a site and take the land, and the bills are to be 

g aid by the city of Boston. The City Council of 
oston is the proper body either to select those 
commissioners or take the land, and it was with 
that idea that I offered the amendment. At pres- 
ent if the city could agree with the owner of any 
land eligible for the Court House it can make a 
bargain and buy it. The only effect of this act is 
to grant the City Council authority to take land 
when the owner is not willing to sell. I submit 
that power should be in the hands of the City 
Council, rather than in the hands of three per- 
sons appointed by the Supreme Court or any per- 
son outside the City Council. 

Mi Parkman — 1 do not wish to be understood 
as advocating the act beiore the House of Repre- 
sentatives, lam not certain what it intends to 
carry out. I don't believe a majority Of the mem- 
bers' of this Council are. I desire that this Coun- 
cil shall not rush blindly into u matter on which 
there is no haste. The Council will readily see 
that no State committee is going to decide so im- 
portant a question at one hearing, and it will do 
no injury to the city of Boston by postponing 
Consideration for one week. 

Mr. Wheeler— I reatl the proposed bill quite 
earefully and it gives the three commissioners 
power to take land, it struck me as palpably 
improper to take this important matter from 
both branches of the city Government. 

Mr. Sealy — I think the amendment of the gen- 
tleman from Ward 1 should not be attached to 
the order. It will not be likely to pass the other 
branch. 

Mr. Bailey thought there could be no hesita- 
tion in the mind of any one as to the desirability 
of preventing the passage of the bill proposed. 

On motion of Mr. Whitmore the main question 
was ordered. 

Mr. Bailey's amendment was adopted, and the 
order as amended was passed. Mr. Bailey moved 
a reconsideration, hoping it would not prevail. 
Lost. Sent up. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Sawyer of 
Ward 18. 



. '.' ■ ' 



4:3 



BOARD OF ALDERM EN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
JANUARY 26, 1880. 



Regular meeting at l 1 /? o'clock P. M., Alderman 
O'Brien, Chairman, presiding. 

,Tl liORS DRAWN. 

Thirty-six traverse jurors were drawn for the 
Superior Criminal Court, February term. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

"Weigher and Inspector of Bundle Hay and 
Straw— AV. Foster AA'acle. Confirmed. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings. Bradlev Fertilizer Company, to en- 
large a wooden building on East Swett street, 
near Magazine street. 

To the Joint Committee on Streets. J. Don- 
nelly & Sons, for permission to post bills on 
fences at corner of Eliot street and Columbus ave- 
nue. 

To the Committee on East Boston terries. East 
Boston Trade Association, for a location of a ferry 
Blip at foot of state street. 

To the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. John E. Woods el al., to be paid for land 
taken on Western avenue. 

'/'a /he Joint Committee on Claims. Julia Mur- 
phy, to lie paid ior personal injuries sustained on 
Whitney street, Dec. 26, 1879. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Joseph Gahn, for leave to occupy brick 
stable for six horse- on .Mechanic Street, Charles- 
town; Richard Stoyle, to occ ipy new wooden sta- 
ble for oue horse, al 2s:; Heath" street. Ward 23; 
Devereux & Meserve, to occupy new wooden sta- 
ble for one horse on Fuller street, corner Milton 
avenue, Ward 24. 

To tlir Com in it tee on Lamps. James Fair- 
weatber ei al., for lamps on East Second and P 
stieet-. 

To the Committee on Paving. George Ellis et 
a/., that Boston street be macadamized from 
\\ ashingtOD -treet to Upham's Corner; W. H.AVest 
et al., that Neponset avenue be put in order at 
Pope's Hill; R. Al. I'ulsifer & Co. et al., that Will- 
iam- court be paved with asphalt blocks; Central 
Wharf and Wet Dock Corporation, for the occa- 
sional use of a portion of sidewalk of At- 
lantic avenue under proper regulations; Henry 
Smith et al., for a plank walk from Grove Hall to 
the New York & New England Railroad Bridge on 
Washington street; S. S. Learnard et al., that 
Western avenue be constructed at its proper 
width and graded, etc.; .John Robie et al., that 
St Hills avenue, Sanford, Temple and Cedar 
streets, Dorchester, be put in order; A. B. Vetter 
& Co., for leave to sprinkle certain streets in 
Roxbury; Richard Holmes et al., that Heath 
street be put in order, and that a plank walk be 
laid on the westerly side; Jacob Fottler et «J.,that 
Glen road, from Walnut avenue to Blue Hill 
avenue, be put in order for public travel: 
AV. F. Warren et "'., that Rockland street, AVara 
25, be put in order for travel; Martin Lynch, for a 
plank sidewalk on Hyde Park avenue, and on .Alt. 
Hope street; Trustees of Alt. Hope Cemetery, 
that Back street, between AValkhill street 
ami Ashland street, be graded; C. S. Perham 
et nl., that Temple street, AVest Roxbury, be 
graded and gravelled; Abbott Lawrence et at., 
that Walkhill street, from Hack street to Blue 
Hill avenue, be put in order; Richards Bradley, 
trustee, for leave to connect two buildings on 
Avery street with a foot-bridge or tire-escape; 
Edward A. Macdonald et al., that Metropolitan 
avenue, Ward 23, be gravelled, etc.; E.J.Baker 
et al., that River street, Want '24, may be graded 
and completed to its full width; Thomas F. Law- 
rence, for a crosswalk on Blue Hill avenue, at 
Maywood street; Middlesex Railroad Company, 
for tracks in Park, Common and Adams streets; 
ilso for change of tracks in Charlestown square 
and at junction of Main and Bunker Hill streets; 
Lucius Newell etal., for a crosswalk on Hudson 
street, between Harvard and Oak streets; J. H. 
I'phaiu et al., that boston street, from AA'ashington 
A'illage to I'pham's Corner, be macadamized; .Alary 
Nixon et a?., that Boston street be put in order; 
F. A. Peters el al., that Boylston street, 
Ward 23, be put in order; R. L. Framp- 



ton et al., that Neponset avenue be put in 
order; B. F. Sturtevant et al., that Union avenue 
be macadamized; Patrick Crosby et al., that 
Keyes street be graded, etc.; George AVeber et al., 
that Canterbury street be put in order: J. H. Cary 
et al., that New Williams street be graded ; George 
AV. Goodale et al., that Madison street be put in 
order; AV. E. Abbott et al., that Blue Hill avenue, 
from AVales street to Walknill street, be put in 
order; John Murphy et al., that Seventh street, 
between B and D streets, be macadamized; Ben- 
jamin Jarves et al., that Fourth street, between 
Dorchester and Atlantic streets, be paved with 
granite blocks. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred In concufrence. 

Order for Overseers of Poor to furnish poor pu- 
pils of the public schools with suitable shoes. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Overseers of Poor in con- 
currence. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to re- 

Eoit on expediency of repairing the Chapman 
choolhouse. Passed in concurrence. 

Report and order to allow the Board of Police 
Commissioners to expend Irom the appropriation 
for Police such sums as may be required to pro- 
vide pensions for retired policemen. Order passed 
in concurrence. 

Order for Mayor to petition for incorporation of 
the City Hospital. Referred to Committee on 
Ordinances in concurrence. 

Report of Committee on Health upon the work 
of keeping crosswalks clear of snow and mud. 
Accepted in concurrence. 

Report in favor, also the passage of , the order 
to heliotype Lamb's map of original Boston 
grants. Order passed In concurrence. 

Request of Trustees of Public Library for larger 
provision for the accommodation of the South 
End branch of that institution. Referred to the 
Committee on Public Library in concurrence. 

Report oi Committee on Public Instruction that 
the order proposing the passage of a law to 
divorce from the City Council all control over 
school expenditures ought not to pass. Accepted 
in concurrence. 

Annual report of Superintendent of Public 
Lands (City Doc. 10); annual report of Citj Sur- 
veyor (City Doc. 11); annual report of Commis- 
sioner on Cambridge Bridges (City Doc. 12). 
Severally placed on iilc. 

Request of School Committee for better accom- 
modations for evening schools. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Public instruction in concurrence. 

Report and order for Mayor to ask for an act to 
require the School Committee to confine their ex- 
penditures within the appropriations made by 
the City Council. Order passed in concurrence. 

Order* for Board of Fire Commissioners to re- 
port the occasion, and the cause of extension, of 
the recent fire in Federal street; and order to re- 
scind so much of the order, already passed, as re- 
quired the Inspector of Buildings to make a simi- 
lar report. Passed in concurrence. 

Report and order for Mayor to petition for an 
act to allow the city of Boston to agree with the 
officers of Harvard University upon the case of 
the Arnold Arboretum, etc. Order passed in con- 
currence. 

Order to consider the expediency ot providing 
that in all bids for proposals none shall be received 
from nonresidents of this State— and if proposals 
must be accepted from parties who are non-resi- 
dents, then the contractors shall employ none but 
permanent residents of Boston, etc. Indefinitely 
postponed, on motion of Alderman Slade. 

Order to consider the expediency of providing 
a record to be kept in the City Clerk s department, 
where books shall be kept containing the names 
of all persons desiring employment— the length of 
time they have resided in the city— whether married 
orsingle— the number of children, if any— whether 
previously employed or not — if so, in what depart- 
ment—and to require all departments to employ 
such registered laborers; the City Clerk to report 
monthly to the City Council the names of all per- 
sons employed aud the wards where they live, 
etc., etc., etc. Indefinitely postponed on motion 
ol Alderman Slade, who said— I will say that since 
I have been a member of this Board we have had 
a good many ridiculous orders come before us, 
but I never saw one so ridiculous as this in any 
shape. 

Order for the Committee on Ordinances to con- 
sider the expediency of repealing or enforcing 
the portion of the ordinance relating to streets 



JANUAEY 26, 1880 



4=4= 



■which requires the Superintendent of Streets to 
keep a set of books with cost of materials and ex- 
penditures, and names of parties who furnish 
material, and of all workmen, and the amount 
paid to each, etc., and to report to the City Coun- 
cil. 

Alderman Slade — I believe the ordinance that 
this refers to is complied with. The Superintend- 
ent of Streets keeps the books and accounts 
liere referred to. The names of employes 
are recorded in these books, and are reported 
to the Auditor monthly. I don't believe 
the ordinance ever required these reports to be 
printed and placed before the City Council quar- 
terly, as this order would seein to indicate. The 
Auditor places before us his monthly exhibit, 
■which shows just how much has been expended. 
If any member of the City Council wants to see 
the books of the Superintendent of Streets he 
«an do so. I think the Aldermen have work 
enough to do without bothering themselves with 
these matters. 

On motion of Alderman Slade, the order was 
indefinitely postponed. 

ELECTIONS. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery. A report came 
down nominating Alderman Walbridge and Coun- 
xjilmen Lauten and Brown as trustees of Mt Hope 
Cemetery. Accepted, and an election ordered. 
Alderman Walbridge received 11 votes and Coun- 
cilmen Lauten and Brown 12 each, and they were 
elected on the part of the Board. 

Director for Public Institutions. A. certificate 
came down of the election of John Taylor as Di- ■ 
xector for Public Institutions in place of Paul H. 
Kendricken ctiosen by this Board. A ballot was had, 
Mr. Kendricken received nine votes and Mr. Tay- 
lor three, and Mr. Kendricken was elected in non- 
concurrence. Sent down. 

NEW COURT HOUSE. 

An order came down for the Mayor to enter a 
protest against the passage of a bill submitted 
to the Legislature for appointment by the Supreme 
Judicial Court of threeCornmissioners on subject 
of a Court House site; also to request the Mayor 
to ask for authority to enable the City Council to 
select and take land for a Court House site. 

Alderman Flynn moved to indefinitely postpone, 
and said he should offer the following, which he 
requested the Chairman to read: 

The special committee of this Board to whom 
■was referred the petition of Henry W. Paine and 
others, in relation to a new Court House for the 
County of Suffolk, respectfully represent that the 
power given to the Board of Aldermen by chapter 
306, acts of 1867, to take or purchase land for a 
Court House, has been exhausted, and it will be 
necessary to procure additional legislation before 
this Board can take any action in regard to select- 
ing a site. 

In view of this fact, your committee respect- 
fully recommend that application be made to 
the present Legislature for a renewal of the 
power granted by the aforesaid statute. 

Your committee beg leave to call attention to 
the fact that an act is now under consideration 
■which contemplates the appointment by the Su- 
preme Court of three commissioners, for the pur- 
pose of selecting a Court House site, with power 
to purchase or take land wherever they may deem 
expedient. 

This extraordinary measure, if adopted, will 
give to three persons the power to select a site for 
a Court House, without regard to cost or the 
■wishes of the community, and force the city to 
pay for the same, whether its financial condition 
will warrant the expenditure or not. 

Your committee believe that it is the duty of 
this Board to take such steps as may be necessary 
to oppose the measure, as being contrary to the 
public interests, and to that end would respect- 
fully recommend the passage of the accompany- 
ing resolves and orders. 

For the Committee, 
James J. Flynn, Chairman. 

Whereas, A bill has been presented in the Legis- 
lature giving the justices of the' Supreme Judicial 
Couit authority to appoint a commission of three 
persons, who shall be empowered to select a site 
for a Court House for the county of Suffolk, it is 
hereby 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this Board the 
proposed measure is unwise and inexpedient, in- 
asmuch as it gives to an irresponsible commis- 
sion, not accountable to the people, the power to 
involve the city in a large expenditure, and in- 



crease the burden of taxation, without allowing 
the citizens and taxpayers or their representa- 
tives a voice in the matter. 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this Board the 
measure proposes an unjust and unwarranted 
interference with our municipal affairs and the 
right of local self-government, and it is hereby 

Ordered, That the City Solicitor, in behalf of 
this Board, acting as County Commissioners, be 
directed to appear before the appropriate com- 
mittee of the Legislature in opposition to the 
proposed act, giving the justices of the Supreme 
Judicial Court power to appoint commissioners 
to procure a site for a Court House in the County 
of Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the special committee of this 
Board on new Court House be authorized to apply 
to the General Court, at its present session, for 
the passage of an act authorizing the Board of 
Aldermen, acting as County Commissioners, to 
take and hold, by purchase or otherwise, so much 
land as said Board may deem necessary for the 
purpose of erecting a Court House for the use of 
the county of Suffolk, and for a Court House yard 
for the same. 

The order from the other branch was indefinite- 
ly postponed. 

The resolves and orders submitted by Alder- 
man Flynn were passed. 

Subsequently Alderman Flynn offered the fol- 
lowing; 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address 
as relates to a new Court House be referred to the 
special committee of the Board of Aldermen on 
the subject of a new Court House. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to public records be referred to the Standing Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen on County Ac- 
counts. 

Passed. 

Near the close of the session. Alderman Flynn 
moved to reconsider the vote of the last meeting 
whereby was passed an order for the Mayor to 
petition for an act to give power to the City Coun- 
cil to take land for a Court House site. The re- 
consideration prevailed, and on motion of Alder- 
man FJynn the order was indefinitely postponed. 

TOPICS IN THE MAYOR'S ADDRESS. 

A report came down with an order referring 
the topics in the Mayor's address to the appropri- 
ate committees. Order passed in concurrence. 

The Chairman appointed the following special 
committees named in the order: 

Revision of Charter — Aldermen Viles and 
Slade. 

Celebration of 250th Anniversary of Settlement 
of Boston— Aldermen Flynn and Whitten. 

Sent down. 

Alderman Flynn offered the following: 

Order— That so much of the Mayor's inaugural 
address as relates to harbor defences be referred 
to a joint special committee, consisting of his 
Honor the Mayor, the Chairman and two members 
of the Board of Aldermen, and the President and 
two members of the Common Council; and that 
said committee be authorized to take such meas- 
ures as they may deem expedient to obtain from 
the National Government an appropriation for 
the improvement of the defences of Boston Har- 
bor; the expense, if any, attending the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for Incidentals. 
Passed — yeas 12, nays 0— and Aldermen Flyun and 
Whitten were appointed on said committee. Sent 
down. 

Alderman Flynn stated that it was the inten- 
tion of the Mayor to have sent in a special mes- 
sage on the subject of harbor defences this after- 
noon, but was prevented by sickness. The time is 
gettiug short, and it had been thought best to 
offer this order. 

PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

A report of Committee on Public Instruction 
came down with an order to petition for the pas- 
sage of a law to limit the expenditures of School 
Committee to the appropriations by the City 
Council. Order passed in concurrence. 

There also came down a report of Committee on 
Public Instruction that the order proposing the 
passage of a law to divorce from the City Council 
all control over school expenditures ought not to 
pass. Accepted in concurrence. 

A report came down with an order to provide 
$118,133 for School Committee by transfer of cer- 
tain sums from other appropriations. 

The question was on the passage of the order. 

Alderman Viles in the chair. 



45 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



Alderman O'Brien— Mr. Chairman: As the mem- 
ber of the Finance Committee from this branch, 
I think I ought to say a word or two in relation to 
the present order. 1 intend to vote for it, hut I 
intend to place on record my protest against it. I 
protest against the extravagance of the School 
Board, not only this year, but for a series of years, 
by which millions of dollars have been uselessly 
expended. I say that millions of dollars have 
been expended by the extravagance of the School 
Board, and I think I can present a few facts and 
tigu/es to show the correctness of this statement. 
I also protest against any board or department of 
the City Government coining here at tlie end of & 
financial year and asking tor so large a sum of 
money. 1 believe it is the duty of every depart- 
ment of the City Government — and 1 don't see 
why the School Board should lie exempt from it — 
to live within the appropriation given to them 
by the City Council. The appropriation granted 
to them at the beginning of the present financial 
rear was a liberal one in every sense of the word. 
We appropriated tor then expenses during the 
Current financial ye^r 11,400,000, and I guarantee 
to say that that was from fifty to one hundred per 
cent, more than was appropriated by any other 
town or city in this country with the same num- 
ber of inhabitants and school children. In his 
address to the City Council, in alluding to the ex- 
pense of the public schools the past year, the 
Mayor gave us the following figures, which 1 will 
read lor the information of the Board, because I 
don't believe the citizens of Boston, or even the 
members of the Board of Aldermen, know how 
extravagant an amount is annually asked for 
the public schools, and it is time we should talk 
out plainly on this subject. The expenditures of 
the School Hoard the past year— this is taken 
from the Mayor's inaugural address— were: 

Salaries oi teachers, $1,101,251.95; salaries of offi- 
cers, 164,421.44; incidental expenses, #'-'51,287.22; 
making a total of $1,406,960.61. 

Expenditures by the Committee on Public Build- 
dings— Incidental's, $91, 088.82; schoolhouses and 
lots, 8296,859.10. 

Total expenditure for schools in 1879 is $1,794,- 
908.53. 

I don't believe any city in the country can show 
a record like that. One million seven hundred 
and ninety-four thousand dollars lor the expend- 
itures in one year for schools ! But this is not aH. 
On the 1st of January there was paid from our 
treasury on account of school expenditures— for 
debt incurred on account of schoolhouses — 
000. Present appropriation to make up the defi- 
v in the appropriation for the current year, 
$118,133. So that when we have passed this appro- 
priation we shall actually have paid from our 
treasury for our schools the past year $2,521,041.53. 

It is true that the present School Board and the 
present City Council are not responsible for the 
expenditures of the 1608,000 I have mentioned. 
That was a debt contracted ten years ago, which 
has just matured. But it ought to i.e placed on 
record thatSn one year— and that is the past year 
— we have actually paid $2,521,000 for the expenses 
incurred in carrying on our public schools. Now 
it gentlemen will refer to page 219 of the Auditor's 
report— and I would advise the members to look 
over that page very carefully in their leisure 
hours, dining the year that they are in the City 
Government— they will see at a glance how ex- 
travagant have been the expenditures For our 
public schools, piul how the School Board have 
run up year after year in their expenses. Take 
the financial year 1853-54; the expense was $11.53 
scholar, it goes on increasing year by year, 
until it reaches $37.11 per scholar, and the last 
financial year, i878-79j it was $28.53 per 
scholar. Now, Mr Chairman, I guarantee that 
the parents Of the children who were in our public 
iolS iii is.">3-54can testily to >hc fact that when 
the School Board expended $11.23 per scholar, the 
schools were equal, if not superior to those when 
the expense has been $28.53 per head. I want to 
Call the attention of the Hoard to sonic other 
facts. In the eleven years from 1854 to 1865, the 
number ol pupils in our public schools was 277,341. 
The average COSt per scholar in those eleven \ ears 
114.10. These eleven j ears covered the period 
when everything was up to very extravagant 
prices. From 1854 to 1800 covered the prices dur- 
ing the war times, and our expenditures for that 
period were .-14.10 per scholar. Well, now, let 
us take the following fifteen years, during most 
of which time we have been at peace, when ths 
expenses of living have been reduced, when the 
necessaries of life have been lower than they ever 



were before within my remembrance, when every- 
thing, every article of provisions, and what we 
eat and wear, were actually lower than they have 
been for years. What has been the result? 
In the following fifteen years, 1865 to 1879, the 
pupils in our public schools have increased to 
590,308, and the average cost per scholar increased 
to $29.48. While the average cost of the eleven 
years, including the period when we were at war, 
and everything was run up to the very highest 
point, the average cost of a scholar in our public 
schools was $14.10; during the past fifteen years 
the average cost of a scholar in these schools has 
been $29.48, or more than double the cost of the 
previous eleven years, and the average increase 
has been $18.38 a scholar. Now, Mr. Chairman, 
the eleven years when the average cost of a schol- 
ar was $14.10 a head, embrace a period when the 
parents of the children in our schools today were 
scholars themselves, and I will guarantee to say 
that those parents will testify almost unanimous- 
ly that when they were in tlie schools they were 
as well conducted as they are now. Asoneof 
those parents, I will go farther, and say that the 
children I now have in the public schools are 
not instructed so well In everything that is 
practical as they were when the cost was only 
$14.10. There is another fact. The School Board 
have not attempted to economize this year. They 
have not given us the least encouragement that 
they meant to do it. They have entered into a con- 
tract for the supply of school books that will en- 
tail an unlimited expense on the city and a heavy 
, burden upon the taxpayers. All a child has to do 
now— and it is very common talk — is to go to 
school for two or three weeks and get a new set 
of books for nothing. These books are forced on 
them. I know a lew bills are sent to the Col- 
lector's Department. But who believes more than 
a very small percentage of them will ever he col- 
lected? There is another fact I want to call the 
attention of this Board to, and that is this: They 
have not only arranged their matters so as to dis- 
tribute books free and force them on the chil- 
dren, but they have gone into the publication of 
books. They are publishing, or have published, 
three volumes of books this year, which will cost 
from six to ten thousand dollars, and which might 
have been postponed for one, two or three years, 
and the schools go on just as well as now. There 
was no necessity for the publication of these 
books, and the School Board have entered into 
this arrangement knowing that their appropria- 
tion was hardly enough to carry them through the 
year. They have actually gone into the publica- 
tion business, that will cost the citizens of Boston 
six to ten thousand dollars, and I suppose these 
books will be forced upon the children without 
pay and without price. The number of scholars 
in the schools in the fifteen years I have referred 
to, was 590,368; the increase per scholar w-as $18.38. 
What does this increased cost amount to? It 
amounts to nothing more or less than waste; 
money thrown away. And what is that 
amount of money "that was thrown away 
by the extravagance of the School Hoard? 
if any Alderman will multiply 590,308 scholars by 
$18.38 increase per scholar, he will find the sum 
of $10,850,963, that has been wasted in these years. 
Ten millions of dollars, .Mr. Chairman, or nearly 
eleven millions, wasted in fifteen years! Well, 
now, these eleven millions would have paid for the 
increased water supply from Sudbury River. If 
we had had these eleven millions we might have 

E aid for the improved sewerage scheme. If we 
ad had these eleven millions we could have 
bought the West Etoxbury park, and also estab- 
lished a water park in South Boston, and then 
had a balance lett. This is what we have lost by 

these extravagant expenditures of the School 
Department. When a scheme is presented be- 
lore us like an additional water supply, improved 
sewerage, the purchase of the West Etoxbury 
park, or the South Boston water park, we feel 
too poor to go into it, and one reason we feel so 
poor is the extravagant expenditures of our de- 
partments, particularly the School Board of 
the city of Boston. I might say also 
that the city of Brooklyn with a 
population double that of Boston, only expends 
1,092 for schools— only about one-half the 
School Board want this year for the public schools 
of Boston. Baltimore, with a population of four 
hundred thousand inhabitants, and that city has 
increased very largely in population within a few 
vears, expended last year, from January to Janu- 
ary, (699,000, and the amount they ask for 188» 
is only $040,000. Philadelphia, with a population 



J A N TJAR Y 26 



1880 



46 



of eight hundred thousand inhabitants, expends 
about $900,000. Boston, with three hundred and 
seventy-five thousand inhabitants, will expend 
$1,518,133, and the School Board will have hardly 
enough money to come out clear. When this 
matter was under consideration in the Common 
Council, Mr. Henry F. Coe of Ward 23, the chair- 
man of the Finance Committee on the part of 
the Common Council, who is also well known as 
the treasurer of one of the largest corporations 
in the city, made the following very sensible and 
truthful remarks, which are worth repeating, and 
I shall trouble the Board to read vhem, because I 
am afraid, gentlemen, you have n't given the at- 
tention to the matter it deserves: 

"I have been looking over the figures with some 
interest as to the cost of our schools in the last 
few years, and I ask the particular attention of 
the Council to them. For the year ending April 
30, 1879, which is the last financial year, the total 
cost of school expenses, excluding new school- 
houses, was §1,519,000. There were 53,262 scholars, 
including 3562 in the evening schools. For the 
financial year 1853-54 the cost of school ex- 
penses was $252,000, and there were 22,528 schol- 
ars. If the cost for 1878-79 had been the same for 
each scholar as in 1853-54, the schools would have 
cost §598,000 instead of §1.519,000, or §921,000 less. 
This amount, if saved, would have reduced the 
tax rate very nearly a dollar and a half on a thou- 
sand, and taken nearly one-eighth off every man's 
tax bill. In other words, while the scholars have 
increased 137 per cent., the amount of expense 
annually has increased 500 per cent. If it is 
said that 1854 is going back too far, we will come 
forward ten years, to the financial year 1863-64, 
which gentlemen will remember was about the 
time gold was bearing its highest premium, when 
all the costs of living were high. Take 1864— the 
number of scholars was 26,961, and the cost of the 
schools was §465,000. If the cost per scholar had 
been the same in 1879 as in 18 4, the School Board 
would have spent §919,000, instead of §1,519,000. 
This basis of expenditures would have saved the 
taxpayers §600,000, or nearly one dollar on a thou- 
sand. So that from 1864, the number of scholars 
has increased 100 per cent., and the expenditures 
for schools 237 per cent. It is true that the board 
made some saving within the last two or three 
years. They have reduced the cost per scholar 
within the last two or three years, making some 
considerable saving. But they have evidently 
come to the conclusion that they have gone as far 
as they can, for their estimates, as submitted this 
year, 1879-80, exceeded the expenditures of the 
previous year about §138,000. It has been stated 
that they have made two reductions of salaries 
of instructors. They have, I believe, made re- 
ductions at two different times; but when gentle- 
men come to look into the matter, they will find 
that the reductions have been very slight. They 
have adopted a sliding scale of salaries, so that 
when a teacher enters upon his duties he re- 
ceives less salary, but there is a gradual increase 
for five years. Looking at the salaries paid now 
to instructors in the fourth grade, the highest 
amount ever paiS for that grade of teachers was 
§750. The amount paid this year to that grade of 
teachers— those who have been connected with 
the school rive years — is §744, and the amount paid 
those teachers aggregates nearly one-half the 
whole amount paid to the instructors. So there 
has been a reduction of less than one per cent, on 
salaries in that case. Take the highest grade of 
masters, and I think the reduction has been five 
per cent. While the Council has gone on and re- 
duced the salaries in the different departments 
connected with City Hall all the way from fifteen 
to, in many cases, twenty and twenty-five per 
cent., the expenditures in the School Department 
remain as they nave been, within a very small 
percentage." 

These facts are worth considering. We are too 
apt to vote money to the School Board without 
asking any questions. I think their work ought 
to be criticised and scrutinized as well as that of 
every other department of the City Government. 
If any injury comes to our public schools, I be- 
lieve it will be from the extravagance of the 
School Board. They have shown nothing less 
than a system of extravagances for a series of 
years. It is only a few evenings ago when I at- 
tended a meeting of 250 of the prominent mer- 
chants in this city, men representing a business 
of a hundred millions of dollars. Some years ago 
Mr. Philbrick, then Superintendent of Public 
Schools in Boston, was before a committee of the 
City Council, and I asked him why it was, 



if I go down to South Market street, 
and to North Market street, to Commercial 
street, or to any of the streets in 
that neighborhood, I find the men who fill the 
prominent positions as merchants in that 1 >cality 
came here from Maine, New Hampshire and Ver- 
mont years ago. It is a fact that the men who 
were present at that meeting a week or two ago 
came here to seek their fortunes as young men 
from Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. They 
never had the benefit of our public schools. I 
made the remark at that meeting that I had no 
doubt nearly all of the 250 men present did not 
receive more than six months' schooling in a year. 
The collector of the port, Mr. Beard, afterwards 
corrected me and said the men in that company- 
did not receive more than three months' schooling 
in a year, and he was one of them. It is a fact 
that the men who fill these prominent positions 
are not graduates of our public schools. They 
are men who came here from New Hampshire, 
Maine and Vermont, and received but three 
months' schooling in a year. The President of the 
honorable body is a native of New Hampshire, 
and a member of this Board, and he 
had to acknowledge that he came here 
to seek his fortune. One of the gentle- 
men asked the New Hampshire men at that 
table to stand up, and they stood up; then he 
asked the Maine men to stand ud, and they did 
so; and then the Vermont men stood up, and al- 
most every man in that room stood up when one 
of those States was mentioned. I don't mean to 
bring this forward as an argument against our 
public schools, but I believe they go into fancy 
studies too much and neglect many things that 
are practical, and after we have voted thi m four- 
teen hundred thousand dollars in a year, I think I 
am justified— although I shall vote "for the order 
giving the additional amount they ask for— in 
protesting against it. 

The order was passed in concurrence— yeas 12, 
nays 0. 

Alderman O'Brien in the chair. 

BOND APPROVED. 

The bond of Peter J. Hughes, constable, being 
presented duly certified, was approved by the 
Board. 

SPECIAL ELECTION IN WARD TWENTY. 

Notice was received from the Massachusetts 
House of Representatives of a vacancy in that 
body by the failure of an election in the Twen- 
tieth Suffolk District. 

Alderman Tucker offered an order— That a war- 
rant be issued for the meeting of the legal voters 
of Ward 20 in this city, at their several poll- 
ing places within said ward, on Tuesday, the 10th 
day of February, at iy 2 o'clock A. M., then and 
there to give in their ballots for one representa- 
tive to the General Court from the twentieth dis- 
trict of Suffolk County, to fill an existing vacancy 
in said district. The polls to be kept open until 
four o'clock P. M. Passed. 

Subsequently Alderman Tucker offered an order 
— That such of the laborers for the city of Boston 
as are residents and legal voters in Ward 20 be 
allowed sufficient time in which to vote at the 
special election ordered in that ward on the 10th. 
day of February next. Passed. Sent down. 

LAND DAMAGES. 

Alderman Flynn submitted orders to pay for 
land taken and damage occasioned by laying out 
streets as follows: 

Ann Hallahan or Hallihan, trustee, §3850,widen- 
ing of Commercial street; John M. Way, §295, 
relocation of Columbia street, between Washing- 
ton street and Blue Hill avenue; Robert Cndman 
and James C. Melvm, trustees, and Edmund 
Quincy and Henry P. Quincy, trustees, S33,0u0, 
extension of Mercantile street from Clinton to 
South Market street: John M. Way, §50, reloca- 
tion of Blue Hill avenue; heirs of Lucy D. Scales, 
§225.75, relocation of Washington street, at Brigh- 
ton, between Cambridge and Market streets. 

Severally passed. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Breck submitted a report from the 
Committee on Licenses granting licenses to eight 
newsboys. Accepted. 

HACK AND WAGON LICENSES. 

Alderman Breck offered an order— That the 
Committee on Licenses consider and report upon 
the expediency of amending section 12 of the 
Regulations of this Board relative to carriages, so 



4.7 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



that transfers of hack and wagon licenses may 
he signed by the clerk of the Hoard authorized to 
gran: such "licenses. Passed. 

TREATMENT OF THE POOR. 

Alderman Walbridge offered an order— That the 
Committee on Printing be authorized to reprint 
City Document No. 36, of 1878, at an expense not 
exceeding $300, to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Printing. Passed. Sent down. 

I Mux KAI1.W x-i . 

Alderman Walbridge offered an order— That 
the Committee on Paving inquire and report 
whether or not the Cambridge Railroad Company 
or the Union Railway Company are running more 
cars per hour upon their new location in this city 
than the terms of said location permit. I'assed. 

0ONTEAOT FOB WATEH PIPES. 

Alderman Thorndike submitted a report from 
the Committee on Water, on request of the Water 
Board, recommending the passage of an order — 
That the Boston Water Hoard be authorized to 
contract for the delivery of the cast-iron pipes 
required lor the ordinary use of the Water De- 
partment during the next financial year: the 
amount of said contract, not exceeding $80,000, to 
be charged to the appropriation to be made for 
the financial year 1880-81, to he divided ;is follows: 
$66,520 to the Cochituate department and $13,480 
to the Mystic department. Passed. Sent down. 

CHELSEA BRIDGE. 

Alderman Woolley submitted a report from the 
Committee on Bridges on the order from last year 
in regard to Chelsea Bridge, recommending its 
passage in a new draft as follows: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor lie request- 
ed to petition the General Court at its present 
session for authority to widen Chelsea Bridge 
from the present line of solid rilling at the Mystic 
River Corporation's wharf to the northeasterly 
draw, and to relocate the draw piers of said draw. 
Passed. Sent down. 

fiki.-ai.akm WIBES. 
Alderman Woolley submitted a report from the 
Commit tee on Kite I department on the part of the 
Board of leave to withdraw on petition ol Gold 
and stock Telegraph Company, I >r leave ^;o 
attach a wire to the fire-alarm telegraph poles on 
Brighton avenue. Accepted. 

SOCIAL t \\\ i.ii'.i: \i;v. 
Alderman Tucker submitted a report from the 
Committee on County Accounts, on request of 
proprietors of the Social Law Library, recom- 
men ding the passage of an order — That there be 
allowed and paid to the proprietors of the Social 
Law Library, under the provisions of section 10, 
chapter 33, of the General Statutes, and chapter 
25 ot the acts of lsii:?, the sum of $1000, said sum 
to be charged to the appropriation for the County 
of Suffolk. Passed. 

PROPOSED l'VUKS AT WB81 BOXBUB1 AND SOUTH 
BOSTON. 

Alderman Breck submitted the following : 

The Joint Special Committee on Public Parks, 
to whom was referred, among the unfinished busi- 
nees ol last year, the communication of the Park 
Commissioners in relation to the West Roxbury 
park, having considered the subject, beg leave to 
report that in their opinion it is desirable that im- 
mediate measures should be taken to secure the 
land required for the purpose, and they would re- 
spectfully recommend the passage of the follow- 
ing order : 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he 
hereby i< authorized to borrow, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee on Finance, for the pur- 
chase i if not less than tour hundred acres of 
land for a public park in West Roxbury, substan- 
tially in accordance with the plan submitted by 
the Park Commissioners in City Document No. 42 
of 187t;, tlu' sum ot $860,000, the bonds or certifi- 
cates oi debt to be issued in negotiating said 
loan to lie denominated on the face thereof, "The 
Public Park Loan," and to bear such rate of in- 
terest anil be payable at such periods as the Com- 
mittee on Finance may determine; and the Park 
Commissioners are hereby authorized to expend 
said sum for the purpose aforesaid. 

The order was read once and laid over. 

Alderman Flynn gave notice that when the 
order came up he should offer an amendment, 
that at least ii50,000 be added for a park at South 
Boston Point. 



WOODEN BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Caton submitted a report from the 
Committee on the Survey and Inspection of Build- 
ings, with an order for a permit to William L. 
Marks to enlarge a wooden building in the rear of 
Cambridge street, Ward 25, near the Roston & 
Albany Railroad. Order passed. Sent down. 

PAVING BEPOBTS AND OBDEBS. 

Alderman Slade submitted the following from 
the Committee on Paving: 

Order giving notice to the American Union 
Telegraph Company to remove the telegraph 
post placed by Said company in the sidewalk on 
Dorchester avenue, in front of the Mechanics' Na- 
tional Rank, to the sidewalk at the intersection of 
Dorches er avenue, Broadway and Division 
street. Passed. 

Schedules of cost of edgestones and sidewalks 
in sundry streets, with orders for the assessment 
and collection ol the same. Orders passed. 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of 
Sewall-Day Cordage Company for orosswalks on 
Parker street. Accepted. 

Order to grade St. Botolph, Albemarle, Black- 
wood, Cumberland and Durham streets, as re- 
cently laid out by the Hoard of Street Commis- 
sioners over land of the Huntington-a venue Asso- 
ciates, between the Providence Railroad and 
Huntington avenue; the estimated expense of 
§400 to be charged to the unexpended balance of 
the appropriation for grading West Chester park, 
etc. 

Alderman Slade said there were several streets 
laid out north of the Providence Railroad which 
were not continuous with those on the south side, 
and the owners have agreed to make them par- 
allel with the streets on the other side, and this 
order is to move the gravel. 

The order was passed. Sent down. 

BOXBUBY (ANAL. 

Alderman Slade offered an order— That the 
Committee on Improved Sewerage continue the 
work ol abating the Roxbury Canal nuisance, as 
authorized by an order passed July hi, lSTS, and 
that said committee be invested with all the 
powers and duties recited in said order. Passed. 
Sent down. 

LAMP DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Breck submitted the following from 
the Committee on Lamps: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Lamps be 
and he is hereby authorized, under the approval 
of the Committee on Lamps, during the municipal 
year )s«0, to contract for and purchase the oil, 
lamps, posts, brackets, cocks, burners, tops, lan- 
terns, tools, horses, harness, stable supplies, and 
such other articles as shall be lound necessary for 
carrying on the Lamp Department; also to em- 
ploy such number of men as may be necessary; 
the cost thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for Lamps. Passed. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Lamps he and 
they are hereby authorized to visit Providence, 
New York, Philadelphia and other cities, for the 
purpose of examining into the systems and meth- 
ods in like departments elsewhere, at an expense 
not exceeding three hundred and fifty dollars; 
the same to be charged to the appropriation for 
Lamps. Passed. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Lamps be and 
they are hereby authorized to cause an addition 
to be made to the building used for a repair shop 
at a cost not to exceed $700; the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for the Lamp De- 
partment. Passed. 

BONDS FILED. 

Alderman Viles submitted a report from the 
Committee on Police on the part of the Board, 
that no action is necessary on the petition of 
Patrick Doherty to be released from the bond of 
James M. Walsh, constable, said Walsh having 
filed a new bond. Accepted. 

SEWERS. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following from 
the Committee on Sewers: 

Ordered, That $9.98 be abated from the assess- 
ment levied upon John B. Witherbee, for a sewer 
on IJurroughs street, on account of over estimate 
of land; that $20.55 he abated from the assess- 
ment levied upon Neil Jacobs's heirs, for a sewer 
in North square, and that the same amount be 
assessed upon Robert Kemp; that $41,78 be abated 
from the assessment levied upon F. J. Ward, for 
a sewer in Ward street, and that the same amount 
be assessed upon Fanny Nathan. Passed. 



JANUARY 26. 1880 



48 



REPORT OF PROBATION OFFICER. 

The annual report of the Probation Officer (City- 
Doc. 13) was received and sent down. The work 
of the year was as foilows: 

Number of persons bailed and placed on pro- 
bation 636 

Numoer done well, and discharged by court 272 
Number sent to their homes out of the city, 

cases laid on file 78 

Number sent to sea, cases laid on rile 18 

Number sent to charity homes, cases laid 

on file 9 

Number surrendered for violation of condi- 
tions made by court 43 

Number left the city, and defaulted for non- 
appearance 12 

Number now remaining on trial for reforma- 
tion 106 

536 

Days in attendance at the Superior Court 98 

Days in attendance at the Central Municipal 

Court 363 

Days in attendance at the outer district courts.. . 105 

Visits to the city prison (each morning) 417 

Visits to the h' mes of persons on probation 649 

Visits at my office of persons on probation 684 

Amount of bail furnished for persons on 

probation 828,040.00 

Amount of costs paid at the expiration of 

probation 969.62 

Amount of expenditures in sending persons 
out of the State 40.15 

Of the 536 persons placed on probation, 271 were 
of American and 265 of foreign birth; 359 were 
males, 177 females; 174 were under twenty-one 
years of age; and, as far as known, about ninety- 
five per cent, were first offences. 
For stationery, postage stamps and telegraph- 
ing #19.61 

For car fares to the outer districts 11.32 

For sending persons out of the State 40.15 

For officer's salary 1,500.00 

#1,571.08 
COUNTY BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Slade offered the following from the 
Committee on County Buildings: 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be and they are hereby authorized to cause 
such repairs and alterations to be made as may 
be needed in the Court House, County Jail and 
Probate Building, also in the Municipal Court 
rooms in the Highlands, Dorchester, West Rox- 
bury, Brighton, Charlestown, East and South 
Boston; provided said repairs and alterations 
shall not exceed the sum of §5000, on any one 
building during the municipal year; the expense 
therefor to be charged to the appropriation for 
tne County of Suffolk. Passed. 

Ordered — That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be authorized to provide the necessary fur- 
niture for the Court House and Probate Building; 
also for the Municipal Court rooms in the High- 
lands, Dorchester, West Roxbury, Brighton, 
Charlestown, East and South Boston; the expense 
therefor to be charged to the Appropriation for 
the County of Suffolk. Passed. 

STABLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following from 
the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board: 

Reports that leave be granted to occupy stables 
by E. E. Rice, on Oriole street, corner of Nasby 
street, and Mrs. Percy P. Nichols, on street lead- 
ing from Tileston street. 

Severally accepted. 

PAY OF DECEASED EMPLOYE. 

Alderman Viles offered an order— That there be 
paid upon the order or receipt of Stephen L. 
Lewis and Hannah L. Dennison, son and daugh- 
ter of Sarah R. Lewis, who died Dec. 18, 1879, the 



sum of $66.66, the amount of salary due the said 
Sarah R. Lewis from Nov. 20 to Dec. 20, 1879, as 
janitress of Police Station No. 2. Passed. Sent 
down. 

AUSTIN FARM BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following: 
Office of the Board of Directors for ; 
Public Institutions, 

Boston, Jan. 24, 1880. 

To the Honorable the City Council of the City of 
Boston: Gentlemen — The Board of Directors for 
Public Institutions respectfully report that the 
appropriation of $12,000, for the erection of an 
addition to the main building at Austin Farm has 
been expended, and that an additional amount 
will be required. 

The expenditures have been as follows, viz. : 

Carpenter's contract #5,735.00 

Bricks, mason work, excavating cellar, and 

stone steps 3,431.78 

Plumbing 959.68 

Labor employed in grading, preparing 

grounds and general work 591.02 

Paint stock and painting 491.37 

Lumber 30099 

Drain pipe 293.01 

Advertising and printing specifications 82.75 

Moving carriage house 76.00 

Iron bars 27.90 

#12,988.40 
The amount required to complete the building 
will be as follows, viz: 

Steam heating #2,400.00 

Estimated extra work on carpenter's con- 
tract 450.00 

Miscellaneous expenses 150.00 

#3,000.00 
The actual cost of the building is $13,944.50; the 
excess being for work of grading, preparing 
grounds around the building, laying drains, mov- 
ing carriage house, and some extra plumbing 
work. The cost of constructing the building 
therefore exceeds the appropriation to the 
amount of $1944.50, which includes the expense of 
erecting a fire-prool wall between the old and new 
buildings, and the extra cost of indirect steam 
heating instead of direct as estimated. The ca- 
pacity of the building has been enlarged consid- 
erably over that originally intended, and room 
has been provided in this addition for one hun- 
dred inmates. 

The Board of Directors respectfully request the 
City Council to transfer the sum of $3000 to this 
appropriation; and suggest that as the House of 
Correction appropriation is ample for the wants 
of that institution, the amount can be spared 
from that appropriation. 

Very respectfully, 

Samuel Little, 
President of the Board of Directors. 
Referred to Committee on Public Institutions. 
Sent down. 

FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Viles offered an order— That two 
members of the Board be appointed to examine 
the annual accounts of the Treasurer of the 
Franklin Fund. Passed, and Aldermen Viles and 
Tucker were appointed said committee. 

CARE OF PUBLIC RECORDS. 

Alderman Viles offered an order— That the 
Committee on Public Buildings consider and re- 
port on the expediency of providing iron doors 
for the office of the Citv Registrar, so as to con- 
form to chapter 29 of the General Statutes, which 
requires public records to be kept in tire-proof 
safes. Passed. Sent down. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Woolley. 



49 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 29, 1880. 



Regular meeting at 1\L o'clock P. M., Harvey N. 
Shepard, President, in the chair. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Reference to the Committee on Public Institu- 
tions of a request of the Hoard of Directors for 
an additional appropriation of $3000 for the addi- 
tion to the main building at Austin Farm. Con- 
curred. 

Report of leave to withdraw on the petition ol 
the Gold and Stock Telegraph Company, for leave 
to attach a wire to the Fire Alarm telegraph poles 
on Brighton avenue. Accepted in concurrence. 

Report and order for a permit to be given to W. 
L. Marks to build in rear of Cambridge street, 
Ward 25. Order passed in concurrence. 

Order to reprint City Document 36, 1878, at a 
cost not to exceed $300. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to pay heirs of Sarah R. Lewis $66.66, be- 
ing her salary from Nov. 20 to Dec. 20, 1879, as 
janitress of Police Station 2. Ordered to a second 
reading. 

Order to grade St. Botolph and other streets at 
an estimated cost of $4000. Ordered to a second 
reading. 

Order to report on the expediency of providing 
iron doors for the City Registrar's Office. Passed 
in concurrence. 

Order to allow city laborers of Ward 20 time to 
vote at the special election to be held in that ward 
on the 10th of February. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for the Committee on Improved Sewerage 
to continue the work of abating the Roxbury Ca- 
nal nuisance, and to have the powers and duties 
recited in the order of July 16, 1878. Ordered to a 
second reading. .... 

Notice came down of the appointment of Alder- 
men Viles and Slade on the Special Committee on 
( i'y Charter. The President appointed Messrs. 
Parkman of Ward 9. Kendricken of Ward 20 and 
Pratt of Ward 21 on the part of the Council. 

Notice came down of the appointment of Alder- 
men Flvnn and Whitten on the committee on, 
the subject of celebrating the 250th anniversary 
of the settlement of Boston. The President ap- 
pointed Messrs. Healy of Ward 10, Sweeney, Jr.,of 
Ward 2. and Sawyer of Ward 24 on behalf of the 
Council. M . .. 

Report and order to petition for authority to 
widen Chelsea Bridge from the Mystic River Cor- 
poration's Wharf to the northeasterly draw. 
Order passed in concurrence. 

Report and order, to contract for cast-iron 
water pipes, at an expense of $66,520, for the Co- 
chituate Department, and §13,480 for the Mystic 
Department. Ordered to a second reading. 

PREVENTION OF WASTE OF WATER. 

Mr. Greenough of Ward 9—1 would like to move 
a suspension ot the rule at this time to enable me 
to introduce an order. The reason 1 do so is this: 
It is an order for a petition to the Legislature, 
and is the result of a conference between the 
Water Board, the Water Registrar and the Com- 
mittee on Water this afternoon, and is intended 
to prevent the waste ol water in the city. The 
reason I ask the suspension at this time is, that 
we may be here late this evening, and may ad- 
journ before we get to water; and if the order for 
the petition is not put in tonight it cannot reach 
the Legislature in time to be received at this ses- 
sion, it will not take the Council five minutes to 
settle it tonight. 

The rule was suspended and Mr. Greenough ol- 
fered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ted to petition the General Court for the passage 
of an act authorizing the City Council to pass an 
ordinance regulating the use of water furnished 
to an j building or buildings, by the application 
of meters to the main service pipe, with a view 
to making the owners, lessee or tenant of such 
building liable for the quantity of water so fur- 
nished. _. _. 

The order was passed to a second reading and 
put upon its passage. w__,^ 

Mr. Greenough— 1 do not think the order should 
be put upon its passage without some accom- 



panying statement, which I will endeavor to 
make as brief as possible. The fact of the matter 
is just this: Boston is throwing away pretty near- 
ly half its water supply. When the "water supply 
was first put in it was estimated that we should 
use forty-five gallons per consumer per day, 
and now we are using about seventy-tive gal- 
lons per day. That has got to be stopped. I have 
some figures here which are worth considering by 
the Council, and which have been prepared 
today by the Water Registrar. The total con- 
sumption of the Cochituate service this year has 
been in round numbers eight billions and a half 
of gallons. That is taken from the record kept at 
the reservoir. They know how much has 
gone in; they estimate how much has gone 
out by the difference between the amount which 
has gone in, added to quantity in reservoir, 
and deducting amount remaining in reservoir. 
This makes the total average of the Cochituate 
service daily of twenty-three million gallons. The 
only way they can get at the leakage is this — 
There have been thirty thousand houses which 
have paid four hundred and eight thousand dol- 
lars, and at two cents a hundred gallons that 
amounts to about two billion and a naif gallons. 
Nineteen thousand business buildings have paid a 
hundred and seventy-three thousand dollars, 
which amounts to eight hundred and sixty-nine 
thousand gallons. For city purposes there have 
been used seventy-five thousand dollars' worth, 
amounting to three hundred and seventy-four 
million gallons. The meter takers have paid two 
hundred and sixteen thousand dollars, amounting 
to nine hundred million gallons. That figures up 
a total paid for of four billions and a half 
gallons, leaving a total of four billions gal- 
lons unpaid for last year. Now, what does this 
actually mean? It means that if we had not 
wasted' all this water, we should not have been 
forced to put in a new supply for a series of 
years. It means also that tne lack of head for 
which many of our manufacturers and others are 
suffering can and ought to be stopped. It means 
also that people who are using no more than they 
pay for are also paying for what other people 
waste, and that if all that water was paid for, the 
price to the water consumer would be just about 
half what it is today. Now, the next question is, 
What are you going to do about it? Various 
methods have been adopted in other cities for 
stopping this leakage. One way is to submit all 
the houses to a rigorous inspection before the 
water is turned on. That is not done in Bos- 
ton, the law requiring the water to be put on 
no matter what the condition of the fixtures is. 
The next thing is to put on meters, which the 
Water Registrar is authorized to do if he sees 
fit — that is, he can put on one meter to each 
consumer. But in many buildings, if he put on 
one meter to each consumer, of which there may 
be seventy, it would necessitate the expense 
of about twenty-five dollars apiece, and there 
will be the risk of freezing, as they must be kept 
in a warm place. The large buildings are the 
places in which most waste occurs. It is the de- 
sire of the Water Board and the Water Registrar 
that they shall be authorized to put on one meter 
in each building, and hold the owner for the 
water consumed. The owner then will look after 
his tenants and see that they do not waste the 
water. Were it not for detaining the Council, I 
could give the members many instances where 
the quantity is known to be ten to fifteen times 
as much as would be used through a meter. It 
was concluded to ask the Legislature for permis- 
sion to take this step. I would say, in conclusion, 
that if any gentleman doubts the advisability of 
this step he will have ample opportunity to de- 
bate it when the question comes up on the pas- 
sage of the ordinance. I therefore hope it will be 
passed tonight. 

The exact figures in the statement referred to 
by Mr. Greenough are as follows: 



JANUARY 29. 1880. 



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The order was passed. 

Subsequently Mr. Greenough moved a recon- 
sideration, hoping it would not prevail. Lost. 
Sent up. 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 17—1 would ask for a sus- 
pension of the rule that I may introduce an or- 
der. It is quite necessary that it should be intro- 
duced tonight, or it will be too late to go to the 
Legislature. It is an order in relation to the City 
Hospital. There is a hearing advertised for Fri- 
day afternoon, but if this order is postponed un- 
til after that time, we shall be a few days behind 
in getting to the Legislature. For that reason I 
ask leave to introduce it now. 

The rule was suspended and Mr. Perkins offered 
the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court for the passage 
of an act to incorporate the Board of Trustees of 
the City Hospital. 

The question was upon giving the order a sec- 
ond reading. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12— X don't wish to show 
any lack of courtesy to the gentleman, but I really 
must say it puts the committee in a very peculiar 
position. The committee have been instructed to 
consider this subject, and have given notice of a 
hearing tomorrow. I don't see why we should go 
on with the hearing in the matter provided the 
Council, tonight, without any argument or report, 
choose to entertain this order and pass it. I think 
the gentleman is in error in supposing it is neces- 
sary to have the order passed tonight to 
enable us to get the subject before the 
Legislature. Everybody here knows it is 
perfectly easy to get a member of the House to 
put in an order requesting the committee to con- 
sider the subject, and then as soon as the commit- 
tee report to the City Council, in case they recom- 
mend it, if the Council should concur in such a 
request, the Mayor can go on and use the influ- 
ence of the city of Boston in aid of any order that 
has been put into the Legislature. It seems to me 
it puts the Committee on City Hospita! in a very 
embarrassing position. We have asked for infor- 
mation, and have advertised a public hearing; 
and now the matter is to be taken out of our 
hands. For that reason I hope the gentleman 
will not press it. 

Mr. Christal of Ward 8 — I coincide with my 
friend from Ward 12. I think it places the com- 
mittee in a very unenviable position. I think it 
is an injustice to them. It takes from them the 
action that belongs to them. It is, rather, taking 
a step that is uncalled for, and as the committee's 
report will be very important in this matter, I 
would move that the order be assigned to the 
next meeting at half-past eight o'clock. 



Mr. Perkins — I hope this matter will not be as- 
signed. It is one of considerable importance, and 
should be passed tonight. The members of the 
Council know that one-fifth of the members of 
the Legislature can stop the passage of such an 
act if they see fit. If we pass this order tonight, 
we shall be able to get action upon it by the Board 
of Aldermen next Monday, and save so much 
time, so as to get the subject before the Legisla- 
ture before the time for introducing new business 
expires. I think there will be no doubt about its 
passage. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4—1 don't know as I exactly 
caught the remarks of the gentleman from Ward 
12, and perhaps I may repeat what he said: but 
it strikes me the gentleman can accomplish his 
object in another way. If he is anxious to get 
this into the Legislature he can get some member 
from Boston to offer an older and send the sub- 
ject to a committee; and then if we have the 
committee's report here and concur in the meas- 
ure, the Mayor can go up and use his influence in 
favor of it. If we pass this order now, it will com- 
mit the city to the measure before we hear the 
report of the committee. I hope the gentleman 
will get some member of the Legislature to offer 
an order for the Judiciary Committee to consider 
it, and that will leave the" Council free to form its 
opinion on the subject after a careful hearing to- 
morrow. 

The motion to assign prevailed. 

HARBOR DEFENCES. 

An order came down for the appointment of a 
Joint Special Committee on the Portion of the 
Mayor's Address relating to Harbor Defences; the 
committee to have authority to take measures to 
obtain from the National Government an appro- 
priation for the improvement of such defences. 

When the order was read the first time, among 
the papers from the other branch, Mr. Whitmore 
of Ward 12 asked to have that matter passed un- 
der the forty-first rule. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 — When the Committee on 
the Mayor's Address considered this subject it 
was understood in committee that the Mayor was 
to send in a special message — 

Mr. Whitmore— I rise to a point of order. The 
forty-first rule provides that any paper of this 
kind, likely to give rise to debate, will be passed 
in its turn, to come up again after the finishing of 
the papers in the same class. I think any debate 
is out of order unless the programme has been 
gone through and this paper come up a second 
time. 

The President— The Chair would rule that as a 
matter of parliamentary practice the order will 
not go over unless it is to give rise to debate. 

Mr. Whitmore — I propose to debate it. 

The order was laid over. 

After the action on the order in regard to City 
Hospital the President took up the order in re- 
gard to harbor defences again. 

The question was upon giving the order a sec- 
ond reading. 

Mr. Whitmore — Mr. President, I moved to have 
this matter taken out of the routine papers be- 
cause I knew the matter of the balloting would 
take the attention of the Council first. This or- 
der as it stands seems to me to be defective in 
tw r o respects. In the first place, in its form. It 
provides that the Mayor shall be a member of a 
special committee, and I think, with all deference 
to the other branch, we have no right to appoint 
the Mayor upon a special co umittee of the City 
Government. In the second place, it will be no- 
ticed that the order, besides appointing the 
Mayor as chairman of the committee, and mak- 
ing the Chairman and two members of the 
Board of Aldermen members of the committee, 
calls for only two members of the Common Coun- 
cil in addition to the President. This commit- 
tee is in that respect very different from 
the usual committees which are appointed, 
the rule being that there shall be three members 
of the Hoard' of Aldermen and five members of 
the Common Council, or two members of the 
other branch and three members of this branch. 
If it were desirable to appoint this committee at 
all, the Council will do well to insist upon the 
custom of having five members of this body to 
three of the other branch. But my main objec- 
tion to this order is, it is unnecessary, and I think 
I may say it is almost unprecedented. I hope the 
committee will lie able to give son. e explanation 
of the necessity of appointing such a committee 
as this. On the face of it, it is almost impossible 
to conceive what good can be gained by tue ap- 



51 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



pointuaent of the committee, unless they are 
to go to Washington as a special lobby to get e 
special appropriation for the harbor defences. W'u 
have two representatives in 'Washington from the 
city of Boston, and 1 can sec DO reason for the ap- 
pointment of a special lobbj agent to go there. 
Unless there is sonic good reason for the appoint* 
nieiit of the committee, I hope the Council will 
put itself upon record against raising a Special 
lobby in favor of this appropriation. Beyond 
that I object to it because it provides that the ex- 
pense, if any, shall be paid from the appropria- 
tion for Incidentals Now, sir. 1 claim that we are 
entitled to know what this is. If there is to be 
any expense, we are entitled to know what 
it 'is. if this is simply to be a proper rep- 
resentation to Congress on the subject, there 
will be no expense beyond a few postage 
stamp-. \ot only do we not know what the 
expense to be incurred is, but there is to be no 
limit to it. I hope we shall not only not appoint 
a lobbying agent to go to Washington,' but that 
we shall not do it with no limit to the expense 
whatever. It may be this is all a fanciful idea of 
mine, but if it i-, tic older is very unfortunately 
drawn. I would move to strike out the two lines 
relating to the expense. IT it is not to be a lob- 
bying agent, there will be no expense about it. I 
do 'not propose to establish a committee to go oh 
to Washington as a lobbying agent with the city 
treasury behind them. I hope that whoever in- 
troduced this order will give some reason for it. 

\li. (He ot Ward H;i— If the gentleman from 
Ward 12 had examined the subject he would have 
seen that this was not a report of the committee 
on the Mayor's address, but was introduced as an 
independent order b) the Alderman from South 
Boston. The Committee on the .Mayor's Address 
had nothing to do with the introduction of this 
order. I am inclined to agree with him in regard 
to the point he makes as to the constitution of 
the committee. The order provides for three 
Aldermen and only three members on the part of 
the Council, which is certainly contrary to cus- 
tom. I understand, however, '•hat in the judg- 
ment of those conversant with the facts, some 
steps should lie taken at once, inasmuch as there 
i9 an appropriation upon trie subject pending in 
Washington. 1 do not intend to make any amend- 
ment in regard to changing the order, but wished 
to call attention to the constitution of the com- 
mittee, so that it will not be a precedent here- 
after. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4—1 hope the Council will 
treat this matter as if it was one that if should 
take action on, and that no feeling of pique or 
that our rules have been disregarded will deter 
us from action. I agree with the gentleman on 
my left and the gentleman opposite, and wire it 
n<it that time is prosing I would go for having 
the committee differently constituted. But it 
there is any necessity Fortfie passage of this order 
or the adoption of any means to secure an appro- 
priation from Congress for the object sought to 
be attained, I think we ought to take the neces- 
sary steps and waive all claims we might have for 
further representation upon that committee, i 
believe there is an imperative necessity for taking 
this action in regard to our harbor defences. Any- 
body who has read tlie report of the Naval Com- 
mittee in Congress showing the condition of our 
navy at the present time, and will bear in mind 
the condition of the harbor defences we have 
now, will .-ay at once that the city of Boston is 
most insufficiently protected in case of invasion 
by war from any quarter. Now, sir, as has been 
said by the gentleman on my left, a bill relating 
to this subject is pending in Congress; the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations are making tip their fig- 
ures, [f this matter is ol such moment that we 
should request the Mayor to go to Washington to 
represent the ease before the proper committee, 
I should be most heartily in favor of sending him 
there and paying bis expenses by the city. I, for 
one, have no fear that any committee ot this City 
ninient on which is placed the Mayor, the 
Chairman of the Board of Aldermen and the 
President of the Common Council, will spend 
money foolishly. I think we can trust them to 
spend whatever money is necessary to accomplish 
the object desired. Now, sir, suppose money is 
to he spent in paying the expenses of the Mayor 
and the committee to go there. We admit that 
the matters we have before our Legislature are 
so important that we appoint a special committee 
to be there every day and represent the interests 
of the city; and not only that, hut we appoint a 
special attorney to be at the State House, and pay 



his expenses to the amount of $3000 for that ses- 
sion. Yet when a great and important matter 
like this, when the interest of the city, is brought 
directly before us, we hesitate about sending a 
representative to Washington, in the person of the 
Mayor and a committee of both branches, to look 
after this matter. Now, sir, I am looking 
at the worst feature which the gentleman oppo- 
site has seen fit to present, 'faking the judgment 
of the committee, and relying upon them' to decide 
what should be done, I say this City Council ought 
to be ready to back them Up in what they may de- 
cide to do. I don't think there is a matter in the 
Mayor's address that dBBerveS more vigorous 
treatment than this very subject. 1 hope; the or- 
der will be passed immediately, as it cauie from 
the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Healy of Ward 10 — I agree with the gentle- 
man from \Vard 4 that an emergency exists which 
calls for us to disregard what may seem an in- 
fringement of custom. It is very well known that 
the seaboard cities of this country are protected — 
if we may use the term — by old-fashioned ord- 
nance. The countries of Europe have been en- 
gaged in perfecting ordnance which will pierce 
Ship armor, and then, again, in turn they have 
been perfecting ship armor which will stand an 
attack from this improved ordnance. While 
they have been doing this, we have been 
doing nothing, partly on account of the 
reaction after the war and partly on ac- 
count of the hard times since. When the war 
ended, there were five ordnance factories in this 
country. Three of them have been shut up for want 
ot patronage. I find there are only two now, one at 
West I'oint, and one at South Bo-ton. I tind that 
the factory at West I'oint does not produce the 
largest kind of cannon, such as is now made in 
European countries; that the South Boston Iron 
Company is the only company in the country that 
can produce this heavy ordnance, the fifteen-inch 
guns. If we are called upon to engage in war 
with any foreign country, the demand lor cannon 
is not one that can be supplied at a moment's no- 
tice. It is not like furnishing the Government with 
shoes, muskets or loaves of bread. The capacity 
of the South Boston Iron Company,] understand, 
by working day and night with skilled workmen, 
such as were employed in the war times, is about 
two cannon a week of the large pattern. The lathe 
moves so si >wly that if you increase- your force of 
workmen tenfold, you do not at all accelerate the 
manufacture of cannon. I pon a sudden call for 
ordnance, we could get but one hundred cannon 
a J ear of the large kind. There would be a neces- 
sity lor spending a very large sum of money upon 
the foundery a West I'oint—up among the hun- 
dreds of thousands— and a delay of months would 
ensue before it could be put in a condition to cast 
this heavy ordnance. So that if the various com- 
plications which may arise should involve us 
in a war, we cannot have the modern ordnance at 
a moment's notice, asjwotild be demanded. Some 
think that the harbor can be defended by tor- 
pedoes, but in a late number of the Army and 
Navy Journal that subject is discussed by General 
Hancock, General Abbott, and others who know 
■what they are talking about, especially the mem- 
bers of Che engineer Corps. They say the ad- 
vantage of torpedoe- is simply to prevent the 
rapid passage of a hostile fleet through a 
channel. But if the torpedoes are out of the 
range of the guns, they are useless, and that heavy 
ordnance Is needed for the defence of the coast. 
If this be so, and our seaboard States are in this 
defenceless condition, as authorities say they 
are, it seems to me we should not stand on a 
point of punctiliousness' with the other branch. 
I understand that if it had not been for the 
Mayor's illness a message would have been sent 
to the Board of Aldermen on the subject last 
Monday. The Board of 'trade of New York is 
moving m this matter, and all the cities along the 
seaboard are alive to the subject. As the gentle- 
man from Ward 4 said, it seems hardly probable 
that the gentlemen who are to be on the commit- 
tee will involve the city in any useless expense. 

Mr. Whitmore — I am very "glad I opened this 
discussion, because we have received a great deal 
of information, sonic of which docs not bear upon 
the point at issue. I did not know it was neces- 
sary to be instructed upon the defenceless condi- 
tion of the seaboard cities and the lack of facili- 
ties for manufacturing ordnance, although it may 
be well to know it. Nor do I think it is necessary 
to throw away all the courtesy due this body and 
dictated by common precedent. I agree that if 
we desire to procure an appropriation it might be 



J"A N UAEY 29 



1880 



52 



-well to send on a lobbying committee with the 
purse of the city of Boston behind them. But 
there has been no attempt to show any such neces- 
sity. It will be seen that this order is drawn up 
in such a way that so much of the Mayor's ad- 
dress as relates to harbor defences be referred to 
a committee, and after hearing the gentleman 
from Ward 10, it seems to me we have not much 
more to learn on this subject. The other part ot 
the order is to provide for a lobbying committee. 
Now, sir, no necessity or emergency has been 
shown requiring us to give this matter up to 
a commitree. The Mayor has not sent in 
any communication on the subject, nor have 
we any reason to infer that Congress will not do 
its duty. Still less have we any reason to believe 
that our public-spirited representatives in Con- 
gress are not as wide awake and ready to attend 
to their public duties as any three Aldermen who 
may be ^ent on to Washington. But my main ob- 
jection is to the indefinite power given to the 
committee. The committee will remain a com- 
mittee for the remairder of the year, and under 
this order they cin draw any amount they olease 
from the appropriation for Incidentals. I hope 
■we shall not give them any such power as this. 
Besides, gentlemen, we must consider this fact — 
The Mayor has quite a considerable contingent 
fund. I venture to say it is more than he will 
spend during the year, or that the committee will 
spend for this purpose. His Honor told us in the 
Committee on Ordinance;? last year, that in 1877 
in an emergency he did employ counsel at the 
State House and paid the expense out of his own 
fund. I know that in an emergency of this kind 
the Mayor would send a representative to Wash- 
ington and pay for it out of his special fund. So 
I do not see any reason for giving away our 
power. Lastly, I think the matter might 
be left in the Mayor's hands. I shall call 
for a division of the order, and in the first place I 
will move as an amendment that the Mayor be 
authorized to take such measures as he may deem 
expedient, instead of appointing a committee. I 
do not see why we should go through all the ma- 
chinery of a joint committee, but "think we had 
better let the Mayor have all the powers that the 
joint committee would have. As I said, unless 
this is to be a lobbying agent, or a picnic commit- 
tee, the Mayor can send an agent to Washington 
and we can give him all the authority it is neces- 
sary for the committee to have. I move to amend 
so that his Honor the Mayor shall have this pow- 
er, and I ask for a division of the order. 

Mr. Parkman of Ward 9 — The gentleman from 
Ward 12 seems to have a mean opinion of a Demo- 
cratic Congress at the present time when he as- 
sumes the only way to get an appropriation is to 
send on a lobbying committee. I do not have any 
such opinion of Congress. Moreover, it seems to 
me that the appointment of the Mayor at the head 
of this committee will be very apt to bring about 
the object we desire. The Mayor has been secre- 
tary of the National Democratic Committee and 
can* no doubt bring about the result we desire. 
Therefore I hope the order will be passed in its 
present form. 

Mr. Whitmore— The gentleman has unnecessari- 
ly brought politics into this matter. If it is as he 
says, what is the use of sending this committee ? 
If it is an extraordinary measure, the Mayor can 
explain it, and if he exhausts his contingent 
fund, the Council will replenish it at once. What 
I object to is the unlimited means and time. If 
there is to be a sum expended, let us mention it. 
I do not see why they should have an indefinite 
control of an unlimited amount of money. 

Mr. Parkman— I would say that the gentleman 
from Ward 12 first implied the necessity for using 
money in Congress. 1 wish to say I do not see any 
necessity for the use of it. 

Mr. Bailey of Ward 4— During the few meetings 
we have had this year, I have had occasion to 
appreciate very highly the acquirements of my 
friend from Ward 12, but I do l.ot know that I 
have fully appreciated them until tonight. I have 
all alonglooked upon him as the conservator of the 
rights and privileges of the Common Council. I 
have looked upon him as the bulwark of our liber- 
ties. I have seen him at the State House asking for 
those rights and seeing that they were maintained. 
I have seen him very indignant at the idea of the 
Aldermen building a new Court House without 
consultation with the Common Council. Yet to- 
night 1 have seen him here advocating the giving 
up of our power to protect the harbor defences of 
Boston. That is what I understand him to say. 



He does not want the committee to go on a jun- 
keting expedition; he does not wish a committee 
of the Common Council to determine anything 
about it, but wants the Mayor to do it all. The 
desire he shows— first, to save a few dollars' ex- 
pense, and, second, to give to the Mayor all the 
powers of the Common Council in relation to our 
harbor defences — is certainly very remarkable. I 
do not want the Common Council to be debarred 
from having something to say about this matter. 
Those who have lived in this city for many years 
know something about the harbor and how it 
should be defended. I will go so far as that. I 
think a few words from my friend opposite will 
be a good thing to have. If it is necessary, I 
think he would be willing to go to Washington at 
his own private expense and urge the improve- 
ment of our harbor defences upon Congress. I, 
sir, would be very glad to have him go, and the 
city pay his expenses. I don't want to see this 
order changed. I want to see the committee 
clothed with full power and the means to support 
the dignity of the occasion. I am willing to trust 
that committee to take all necessary and proper 
measures t<» accomplish an object which eTen the 
gentleman himself acknowledges to be a good 
one, and which must be looked after. That ob- 
ject being so desirable, it does not become this 
Council to refuse to trust his Honor the Major, 
the Chairman of the Board of Aldermen, the Pres- 
ident of the Common Council aud members of 
both branches witli the little expense necessary 
to carry it out. 

Mr. Whitmore's amendment to confer the pow- 
er upon the Mayor alone was rejected. 

Mr. Whitmore's amendment to strike out the 
part relating to expense, and .charging the same 
to Incidentals, was lost. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Whitmore — I move to substitute for the 
words "the expense, if any," the words "the ex- 
pense, not exceeding $5000." I would like to see if 
we have any limit to the expenditure. 

Mr. Bailey — I have simply one word of objec- 
tion to that amendment. I do not want the com- 
mittee to even presume that this Council intends 
they shall spend such a sum of money. If such 
an amendment as that is adopted, and the order 
passed, the committee will take it for granted 
that the Council are willing they should spend 
that amount. 1 think we had better leave it to 
their discretion. 

Mr. Whitmore — I offered the amendment in 
good faith, for this reason: I think the gentle- 
man misunderstands the practiceof the City Gov- 
ernment in past years. It is not the rule to give 
committees indefinite authority to spend money. 
Expenditures are always limited, and then we 
know how much we have mortgaged our revenues 
for. I am willing to put it at $5000, which is an 
extravagant limit. If any member puts in an or- 
der lor printing, the cost is not to exceed $500 or 
$1000, or whatever it is. It is not because the 
Council think anybody is going to do anything 
rash, but because we should put a limit upon the 
expenditures. I have put the amount large, not 
supposing for a moment it is going to be anything 
like it. But there ought to be a limit, if it is a 
hundred thousand dollars. 

Mr. Whitmore's amendment to limit the amount 
to $5000 was lost. 

The order was read a second time, and on mo- 
tion of Mr. Bailey the rule was suspended, and 
the order passed— yeas 60, nays 6. 

Yeas — Messrs. Anthony, Austin. Bailey, Barry, 
Bigelow, Blakemore, Bowker, Brimbeconi, Brin't- 
nall, Brown, Child, H. Clapp, Coe, Cronin, De- 
vine, C. F. Doherty, J. Doherty, Donahoe, Dudley, 
Farwell, Fisher, Fitzpatrick, Folan, Freeman, 
Greenough, Hancock, Hart, Healy, Hilton, Hollis, 
Hosley, Howard, Kendricken, Kidney, Lauten, 
Loveli, Maguire, McLaughlin, McNamara, Nason, 
Parkman, Perkins, Plimpton, Pratt, Pray, Rogers, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Sibley, D. J. Sweeney, 
Sr., D. J. Sweeney, Jr., Swift, Taylor, Tucker, 
Viles, Ward, Wharton, Wheeler, Williams, Wy- 
man — 60. 

Nays — Messrs. Chrlstal, Morrison, Murphy, 
O'Dowd, Welch, Whitmore— 6. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. H. B. Clapp, 
Denney, Devlin, Lane, Sweetser — 5. 

Mr. Bailey moved a reconsideration, hoping it 
would not prevail. Lost. 

The President appointed Messrs. Bailey of 
Ward 4, and Coe of Ward 23, on the part o'f the 
Council. 



53 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



RULES AND ORDERS OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 6 called up the special as- 
signment ti>r 8.30 1*. M., Tiz., The report of the 
Committee <>n Proposed Amendments to the 
Rules and Orders of the Common Council, to- 
gether with amendments proposed to those rec- 
ommended in the report. (City Doc. 14.) 

The question was first, upon the amendment 
of Mr. Swift, providing that a notice of motion 
to reconsider an amendment shall be considered 
When the main question, specially assigned, is 
taken up. 

Mr. Swift— It should have been stated that this 
amendment is to he placed at the end of rule 66. 
I do not propose to take up time ii: discussing 
this amendment, i feel no particular Interest in 
its passage, but it seemed right to me to suggest 
it, because l believe it will he very useful, or 
rather it might he very useful. It provides for a 
case where an amendment has been rejected, and 
then the matter to which the amendment is 
offered is specially assigned. It can only apply 
to such a case. The Council can easily Bee that 
it might occur on almost anyque-tioB. it did 
ccur once last year. Unless this amendment is 
adopted, when such a case as this arises it is 
wholly unprovided for. An amendment may he 
rejected on a close vote, and the subject after- 
wards assigned, and it would be necessary to 
Suspend the rules to enable a member to move a 
reconsideration of the amendment. If it was a 
close vote, it might be impossible to obtain a 
suspension of the rules, because a two thirds 
vote would be necessary. As this is a case that 
might arise at any time, and it could not possibly 
do any harm to put this provision in, I thought 
it would be well to add it to rule 61). 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— These rules have been 
laid before the Council, and I suppose it would be 
impossible to suit every member precisely, as he 
would desire to have "some particular case that 
has been or may arise. In answer to the gentle- 
man from Ward 12, and I mean it with all respect 
to what he has proposed, the committee say they 
'•do not deem it expedient to recommend the 
adoption of amendments which merely change 
the phraseology oi existing rule-, nnle-s some 
manifest advantage is to he gained thereby. 
Neither do they consider it advisable to adopt 
rules relating to questions that are of infrequent 
occurrence in the transaction of the business of 
the Council." Many Of these changes submitted 
at the last meeting do not add one single particle 

to the rules, anil still they don't seem to be of any 
disadvantage. The role seemed to be plain before 
and could be complied with. A president may 
not always decide strictly according to the rule. 
Somuchfor these amendments. Now in regard 
to the amendment of the gentleman from Ward 9. 
A. case happened last year and he was interested 
in it. If a reconsideration is moved it coroes 
up at the next meeting. The member 
moving it may not be there to attend 
to it, but he can move a suspension of 
the forty-first rule, and since I have been a mem- 
ber the generosity of the Council has granted the 
request in nine "cases out of ten. It was done in 
the <a-e referred to. The rule was suspended 
and the gentleman gained his point. I see no 
neces-uy tor establishing a precedent for a case 
that may some up once in awhile so far as I am 
able to judge, I hope the rules will pass as sub- 
mitted. Still, I hope every member on this floor, 
if it takes from now until "the 31st of next Decem- 
ber, will have the pleasure of saying all they de- 
sire to say upon the subject. 

Mr. Swift— When this case happened last year 
the Council, with great courtesy, suspended the 
rule for my benefit. It is not at all likely I shall 
require it to be done again. It is not at all proba- 
ble I shall be placed in the same position again, 
but it may happen to some other member, and it 
will be well enough to provide for this, so that he 
will not have to ask a Suspension of the rules. It 
can easily be perceived that such a reconsidera- 
tion might hAmoved upon a matter upon which 
the Council was about evenly divided, and upon 
which there was a great deal of interest, and 
where it might seem to the Council that it would 
be useless to suspend the rule. In that case the 
member would have his rights preserved by this 
amendment. 

Mr. Whitmore— I do not intend to take up the 
time Of this Council on the question very much, 
particularly as a good deal less than a quorum is 
present. I want to call the attention of the Coun- 
cil, or rather the unhappy few who remain here, 
to the fact that the committee say no changes are 



needed, when in point of fact they have made- 
quite a number of changes and have taken every 
suggestion 1 made except this one section. The 
trouble about it is, Mr. Swilt understands the mat- 
ter because he was a victim last year. When these 
things come up once they always come up again. 
It is no argument in regard to a rule to say you 
can suspend it or do away with it. That is per- 
fectly true, but in that case you do not need any 
rules at all; you can rely upon the common sense 
of the Chair. Any one who reads these rules will 
not fail to recognize the fact that this is one which 
meets a case which will happen. If we don't 
make this rule, some member may be deprived of 
his rights. Last year Mr. Swift desired to move 
an amendment which had been lost by two votes. 
He was enabled to bring the reconsideration up 
by a stretch of the law. It is not a fanciful 
case, but a case which has happened. 
I remember the remark made by my friend 
Nason of Ward 17, going home that evening, that 
it was perfectly wrong to take up with the idea 
of suspending your rules. It would have been 
better if Mr. Swift had suffered by having his 
amendment too late. This idea of Suspending the 

rule because you don't know how to frame it, or 
don't wi-.li to change it when the error is pointed 
out, is unbecoming the dignity of this body. I 
have no interest in this matter more than any one 
else. When 1 have seen a case where I thought 
the rules could • e amended and improved 1 have 
proposed a change. Mr. Swift has been the vic- 
tim in this case, and is an advocate of the change. 
It is a ease not provided lor in the rules or in 
Cushing's Manual. It Is a new principle, and as 
it has come up in this body, we can qnd should 
make it perfectly plain by a few words. It is 
stated by the committee in their report, ami by a 
member on the floor, that they do not intend to 
make any changes which merely change the form 
or phraseology of the rule, no matter whether it 
is grammatical or otherwise; moreover, they 
don't intend to cover all the questions of parlia- 
mentary law, and provide for all the business of 
the body, but intend to trust to the discre- 
tion of the presiding officer. In that case 
1 would a>k "why the committee continue to 
report a provision for the committee of the whole, 
in roles 39 and 40. I think no member here has 
seen the Council gointo a committee ol the whole. 
If it is unnecessary to provide for a case that has 
occurred once, why provide for a committee of 
the whole which the Council never go into. 
Moreover, why should there be any objections to 
formulating a rule which is not provided for in 
Cashing, and which is, 1 think, as necessary as 
any ruiesVe have. I think the gentleman from 
Ward 9 has given good reasons why it should be 
adopted. 

The amendment of Mr. Swift was adopted. 

The question next came upon the amendment 
of Mr. Whitmore to substitute for rules 45 and 68 
a rule providing for elections of salaried officers 
by ballot, the nominations to be made by com- 
mittees, and all confirmations of the Mayor's 
nominations to be by yea and nay ballot. 

The question was put, and the amendment was 
declared rejected. 

Mr. SS'hitiuore— I doubt the vote, which will 
give me the right to debate the question, but I 
will also state that I was on the floor and ad- 
dressed the Chair before the question was put. 

The President — The gentleman is out of order. 
The gentleman has no right to debate a question 
while the Chair is solving a doubt. 

Mr. Whitmore — I appeal from the decision of 
the Chair. 

The appeal not being seconded it was not enter- 
tained. 

The Council was divided — is for, 29 against — 
and the amendment was lost. 

The question next came upon Mr. Whitmore's 
amendment to rule 46, providing that no 
motion shall require to be seconded, except an 
appeal from the decision of the Chair. 

Mr. Bailey — Is the rule now that it shall be sec- 
onded ? 

The President— There is no rule. 

Mr. Whitmore— I desire to call attention to the 
fact that from the statement in Cushing it is very 

8 lain that every motion must be seconded, and 
ushing's Manual is one of our rules. 
The I'resident — Will the gentleman please read 
the section of Cushing which requires it? 

Mr. Whitmore— I have not a copy here and shall 
have to call for one. Fending that matter, how- 
ever, I desire to withdraw all amendments I have 
offered. It is useless to press them. 



JANUARY 2 9, 1880 



54, 



Mr. Bailey— I object. 

Mr. Whitmore— I desire also the privilege of 
making a personal explanation at this time, be- 
cause 1 have — 

Mr. Bailey — I object to withdrawing the amend- 
ments. I propose to vote for some of them. 

Mr. Whitmore — I desire to make a personal ex- 
planation for this reason: At the last meeting of 
the Council, as the matter stands on the report, 
the Chair was engaged in solving a doubt, as he has 
already done this evening; and after I had made 
some remarks and taken my seat the question 
was raised whether I was in order or not. The 
Chair rules that I was out of order, and I regret 
to state that in the report of the proceedings it 
stands on the records that I made a remark that I 
should have controverted the subject, which I am 
willing to confess is not the remark I should have 
made to the President and was not intended as 
anything personal to him. It was a jocose re- 
mark, which I did not expect would have been 
caught so easily by the reporter. I should 
have said, at that time, if I had gone on, that I 
should dispute the decision of the Chair when- 
ever an occasion occurred, because of a cer- 
tain section of Cushing, 1641, which seems 
to be so entirely adverse to the President's 
decision that I should have quoted it 
and referred him to it. Therefore I beg to with- 
draw the remark of the other evening, and read 
the section- 
Section 1614. "When a question is taken by the 
voices, and the Speaker has declared that the 
ayes have it, or the noes have it, as the case may 
be; if his decision is called in question, that is, if 
any member rises and says that the noes have it or 
the ayes have it, contrary to the opinion expressed 
by the Speaker; this entirely does away with the 
effect of the Speaker's decision, and makes it 
necessary to ascertain the sense of the house by a 
division. The question is then again open for 
debate, until the numbers which are the result of 
the division have been announced." 

It seemed so plain in that case that it was in 
order for me to debate, that I should have read 
the section instead of making the remark I did. I 
will further add that if it had been possible to 
have got a second on the appeal this evening, I 
should have submitted this same section that the 
right to debate a question, after a doubt is raised, 
is one of great importance to members of the 
Council. 

The amendment under consideration was lost. 

The question next came upon the proposed 
amendment to rule 49 to strike out the words "to 
postpone to a day certain," and substitute the 
words "to specially assign to a certain hour." 
Lost. 

The question next came upon the amendment 
to the same rule, 49, providing that the several 
motions named in the rule shall have precedence 
in the order in which they stand arranged, etc., 
and that "the previous question may be demand- 
ed upon an amendment, and that motion shall be 
decided without debate." 

Mr. Bailey moved to amend by striking out all 
before the last two lines, so that it would read, 
"the previous question may be demanded upon 
an amendment, and that motion shall be decided 
without debate." 

Mr. Bailey — I hope that amendment will pre- 
vail. I moved to omit the rest of it simply be- 
cause the general parliamentary rule now is that 
a substitute for a bill is an amendment; but I 
think the last part is an entire innovation from 
parliamentary law, and, so far as I am informed, 
it has never been in use anywhere. But if gentle- 
men will pause for a moment they will see it is a 
good rule to adopt. Suppose an ordinance is un- 
der discussion, after having debated it here an 
hour and a half, and much interest is manifested 
in it, an amendment is proposed and discussion 
ensues upon that amendment, somebody gets 
tired and moves the previous question. We are 
all so tired that we vote to order the previous 
question, which not only cuts off a discussion 
upon the amendment, but upon the entire ordi- 
nance; whereas, if this rule is adopted, a member 
may demand the previous question upon that 
amendment, and the adoption of it will simply 
cut off discussion upon the amendment, and after 
that has been settled we can go on and debate the 
ordinance. It seems a good rule, and I hope it 
will be adopted. 

Mr. Bailey's amendment to Mr. Whitmore's 
amendment was adopted, and the amendment a9 
amended was adopted. 

The question next came upon the amendment of 



Mr. Whitmore to rule 53, limiting debate on the 
previous question to ten minutes, but providing 
that the merits of the main question shall not be 
discussed. Adopted. 

The question next came upon the amendment 
of Mr. Whitmore to rule 62, providing that in 
cases of appeal the question shall be put as fol- 
lows: "Shall the decision of the Chair stand as 
the judgment of the Council ?" etc. 

Mr. Whitmore — I did not intend to interfere in 
any of these rules, but as this one belongs to the 
Chair I might seem lacking in courtesy if I failed 
to second the motion I had already made in his 
behalf. Last year when a member was in the 
chair— not myself— the question was put and it 
resulted in a doubt. Under the rule as it stands 
the decision of the Chair was lost, owing to the 
way in which the question was worded. The next 
morning I met Speaker Wade,who adverted to the 
fact and said it was something unprecedented in 
his experience or reading. It was understood 
that the Chair had the affirmative, and the ques- 
tion is always put, Shall the decision of the 
Chair stand as the deci*ion of the 
Council ? and the Chair has the benefit of all the 
affirmative votes. But in tne case which hap- 
pened last year the Chair had his decision over- 
ruled. Had it been put the other way it would 
have been sustained. As I believe the Chair 
should be sustained in all doubtful cases, I hope 
the Council will adopt this amendment, as in 
cases of doubt it is better to maintain the au- 
thority of the Chair. 

Mr. Sibley — I see no objection to that amend- 
ment, if it makes it any plainer. I thought it 
was very well before; but as the gentleman has 
explained it I hope it will pass. 

The amendment was adopted. 

The report of the committee as amended was 
accepted, and the rules as amended were adopted. 

The question next came upon adopting the 
order reported by the committee, regulating the 
use of the rooms in charge of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

Mr. Bailey moved to amend by striking out the 
provision that visitor* should be exempt from 
the privilege of smoking in the anteroom, so that 
no smoking would be allowed. Lost. 

The order was passed. 

Subsequently Mr. Sibley moved to reconsider 
the votes by which the rules were adopted, hoping 
it would not prevail. Lost. 

The President— Before the Chair proceeds with 
the unfinished business, he would say in refer- 
ence to the objection made to the ruling of the 
Chair by the gentleman from Ward 12— and the 
Chair is sorry to see the gentleman is not in his 
seat at this time— the Chair decided that debate 
is out of order when he is engaged in solving a 
doubt, and the gentleman from Ward 12 has 
quoted a certain section from Cushing's larger 
work. The Chair would call the attention to rule 
64, which reads as follows: 

"If the President is unable to decide, and any 
member doubts the vote, the President shall 
cause a return of those voting in the affirmative 
and negative without further debate on the 
question." 

ASSESSORS. 

Mr. Kidney of Ward 6 called up the special as- 
signment for eight o'clock, viz., majority and 
minority reports' and ordinances on the assess- 
ment and collection of taxes. (City Doc. 17.) 

Mr. Kidney said there was considerable busi- 
ness on the docket, and at the request of mem- 
bers who desired further time to look into the 
matter, he moved the subject be specially as- 
signed to the next meeting, at eight o'clock. 
Carried. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to supply furniture for public buildings, 
and to make necessary repairs on, and cause to De 
kept in order, the City Hall and the police sta- 
tions and engine houses. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to supply furniture for, an# cause to be 
repaired and cleansed, the several school build- 
ings. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to purchase supplies, instruments, draw- 
ing materials, and to incur other necessary ex- 
penses for the City Engineer's Department. 
Passed in concurrence. 

Order to make like purchases and incur like 
expenses for the City Surveyor's Department. 
Passed in concurrence. 

Order to contract for filling all or part of Com- 
monwealth avenue extension, when the owners of 
land abutting on the extension shall agree to the 



55 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



simultaneous tilling of the lands within the 
bounds of Beacon street, West Chester park and 
the Boston & Albany Railroad. Passed in con- 
currence. 

Order to prepare and print an index of names 
and subjects to the twelve volumes of proceed- 
ings of the City Council at a cost not to exceed 
Amended on motion of Mr. Sweeney. Sr.. of 
Ward 2 by making the expense not exceeding 
$1000 and to be changed to the appropriation for 
Printing. Passed as amended, sent up. 

Order to contract daring the present year for 
the purchase of hay, grain, stock and supplies for 
the Health Department. Passed. Sent up. 

i i.i:< riONS. 
Trustees of Mi. Hope Cemetery. A certificate 
came down of the election of Alderman Wal- 
bridge and (ouneilnien Lauten and Brown as 
trustees Of Ml. Hope Cemetery. On motion of 
Mr. Fisher of Ward 24 an election was ordered. 
Committee — Messrs. Fisher ol Ward 24, Howard 

Of Ward I, and Hancock ol Ward 1. On motion 
of Mr. Maguire of Ward 19, the usual recess was 
taken while the committee were out. 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary for a choice 30 

Alderman Walbridgo had 59 

Councilman Brown had 58 

Councilman Lauten had 58 

One ballot for Directors for Public Institutions not 
counted. One blank. 

Messrs. Walbridge, Brown and Lauten were 
elected in concurrence. 

Director for Public Institutions. A certificate 
came down of the election of Paul H. Kondricken 
as Director for Public Institutions, in place "I 
John Taylor chosen by this Council. An election 
was ordered. Committee— Messrs. Wyman of 
Ward 21, Coe Of Ward 23, and Dennev ol Ward 12. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley of Ward a. the usual 
recess was taken while the committee were out. 

Whole n uni her of votes 64 

Necessary for a choice 33 

John Taylor had .. 38 

Paul II. Kcndricken 20 

Mr. Taylor was elected in non-concurrence. 
Sent up. 

Trustees Public Library. The Council took up 
as unfinished business the election of trustees of 
Public Library. Committee— Messrs. Healy of 
Ward 10, Fitzpatrick of Ward 8, and Dokerty of 
Ward?. 

On motion of Mr. Christal of Ward 8, the usual 
recess was taken while the committee were out. 

Fifty-eight ballots were cast, of which Alder- 
man O'Brien had 57, and Councilman Pratt 58, 
and Joseph A. 'I'ucker 1. 

Messrs. O'Brien and Pratt were elected in con- 
currence. 

Directors of Bast Boston Ferries. The Council, 
under unfinished business, proceeded to am elec- 
tion for Directors of East Boston Ferries. Com- 
mittee— Messrs. Anthony of Ward 19, Hlakemore 
of Ward 23, and Swift of Ward 9. 

On motion of Mr. Pray of Ward 5, the Council 
took the usual recess while the committee were 
out. 

Fifty-tive ballots were cast, of which Alderman 
Breck received 54, Councilman Brintnall 55, and 
Councilman Hancock 54, and Isaac Rosnosky 1. 

Messrs. Breck, Brintnall and Hancock were 
elected in concurrence. 

DECORATION DAY. 

Under unfinished business the Council consid- 
ered the order to allow (200 for each poet of the 
G. A. R. for Decoration Day expenses and relief 
of families of deceased or'disabled soldiers and 
sailors. 

Mr. Greenough— I would like to ask, for infor- 
mation, how many posts there are in the city? 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 17— There are twelve posts 
of the Grand Armv located in Boston— numbers 
7, 11, 15, 23, 28, :!-', 68, 92, 113, 125, 134 and 149-which 
will make ui appropriation of $2400. 

Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10— Is the gentleman who 
submitted this order satisfied that these funds in 
every case go in the direction which they purport 
to go ? I know that has been a question when this 
matter has come up before. 

Mr. Perkins— In reply to the gentleman I would 
say that last year there was a special committee 
appointed on this subject to investigate the whole 
matter and consider whether it was advisable to 
appropriate this sum for the X. P. Banks Army 
and Navy Corps. They went into the subject very 
thoroughly and were entirely satisfied that so far 
as the Grand Army of the Republic is concerned 



ated. 
g any 



every dollar of it was properly appropri 
'I hey reported unanimously against giving 

money to the Banks Army and Navy Corps on ac 
count id its condition. It was in the hands of a 
very tew. who acknowledged that they had mis- 
appropriated the money, but in the case of the 
Grand Army they reported there was no doubt 

that every dollar of it was properly used 

Mr. Christal of Ward 8— J hope" this order will 
not pass, it semis to me that two hundred dol- 
lars to pay for Decoration Day expenses is a use- 
less expenditure ol money. I think t he time his 
arrived when we should do away with any display 
in this matter, and it seems to me it is reviving 
Old quarrels. It is reminding people of what has 

Fassed, and I think it should not go anv further. 
t was said last year that sonic of rh'is money 
went to ( ; i and A liny posts composed ol only ten or 
twelve members and which had passed out of exist- 
ence except on paper: Whether that is true or 
not, 1 am satisfied that the amount given lor that 
pui pose is a useless expci. dit me of money, and I 
think the thing should be Stopped at the present 
moment. I am not in favor of that order. 

Mr. Perkins— It is hardly necessary to reply to 
the gentleman from Ward 8 in such remarks. I 
hardly think any gentleman in this Council will 
echo the sentiments expressed by him. It he will 
lookback to the time when this country was in 
trouble, he will find that those men volunteered, 
and deprived themselves of all the luxun 
home and friends, went into the armv anil served 
their country, and by their help this nation has 
been saved and remains intact. The appropria- 
tion oi twenty-tour hundred dollars once a year 
is a very small sum to repay them for all the sac- 
rifices and injuries they received in behalf of 
their country. I do not believe this City Govern- 

i it is willing to start in t*ie direction pointed 

out by the gentleman From Ward x. it seems to 
me the gratitude of this city to hose men cannot 
have died out yet. Without any further remarks 
upon the subject, I hope we' shall come to a 
vote. 

Mr. Christal— It does seem to me from the re- 
marks of the gentleman that I have no knowledge 
of the duty performed by th gentlemen, and I 
shall take it for granted that all these parties 
Who participated In the great struggle he speaks 
of exist at the present moment. I fail to see it in 
that light. But the wa\ it stands now is, there 
are only a very few of the (irand Armv existing. 
Twelve posts bespeaks of, and the number in 
each post I have not heard yet, and whv the 
country has done these men justice at time-.' No- 
body doubts it, and the country is doing them jus- 
tice" today, and nobody doubts "that; and nobody 
doubts that these men deserve a great deal of 
cre<lit for the patriotic manner in which they 
went forth to save the country. But the time has 
come when these things shouid be forgotten; and 
the time has come for Boston to put its foot down 
and say we have had enough of this strife, and 
keep it out. Whether we should make another 
approi riation for this purpose or not, I think 
should be considered. I see no propriety in ap- 
propiiating money for them or any other organ- 
ized faction of the city of Boston. 

Mr. Lauten of Ward 14—1 don't think tne time 
has come to do away with this beautiful custom. 
I don't propose to uiake any further remarks on 
th subject, but it must be' evident that the gen- 
tleman from Ward k did not do any service to- 
wards preserving the country. 

The roll was called upon the passage of the 
order. 

When the name of Mr. Christal was called he 
did not vote. At the conclusion of the roll-call 
Mr. Sibley called for the enforcement of the rule. 
Mr. ( hristal's name was called aud he answered 
"Yes." 

The order was passed — yeas 61, nays 0. 

Mr. Perkins moved a reconsideration, hoping it 
would not prevail. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Buildings was presented. The expenditures 
for repairs, alterations and improvements of pub- 
lic buildings include all the buildings belonging 
to, or hired by, the city (except schoolhouses and 
county buildings), used for the accommodation of 
the City Government and the various depart- 
ments, numbering 131, and the amount expended 
on these for the past year has been S68.912.13. 
The following are the buildings from which rents 
have been received during the past year, together 
■with the amounts, all of which are in charge of 
this department. 



J ANUAE Y 29 



1880. 



56 



Faneuil Hall Market and cellars, $79,390.78; 
Faneuil Hall building;, stalls and cellars under 
Faneuil Hall, $21,625.80; Old State House, $16,000; 
Quincy Hall, $3612.50; Eastern-avenue wharf, 
$3000; bouse 94 Koxbury street, $300; estate 37 
Boylston street, $1575; stable, Charlestown Dis- 
trict, $150; Curtis Hall, $120; wardrooms, $532; 
total, $126,306.08. 

There has been expended on county buildings 
$29,367.03, as follow* : The total number of build- 
ings occupied for school purposes, owned by the 
city, is 168, containing 1296 schoolrooms; in ad- 
dition, colonies are established in six buildings, 
hired for that purpose, furnishing twelve school- 
rooms, making the total number of buildings in 
which school sessions are held 174, containing 
1308 schoolrooms. The expenditures for ordi- 
nary repairs, supplies and furniture for these 
houses lor the past year have been $91,074.40. 
Seven appropriations for new buildings and im- 
provements have been in charge of this depart- 
ment during the past year, the amount of appro- 
priations for such being $498,000, including the 
heating and furnishing of a portion of the same. 
This includes the amounts appropriated by the 
City Council the past year, together with the 
amount carried over from the previous year. 
These are the English High and Latin School) Po- 
lice Station 6, grammar school, Brighton District, 
primary schoolhouse, Charlestown. 

The unexpended balance of the appropriation 
for the repairs of Eastern-avenue wharf, amount- . 
ing to $3500, was set apart for repairing the build- 
ings of the Health and Paving departments, south 
yard; also, for repairs upon the roof and cellars of 
Faneuil Hall Market. The amount expended on 
this appropriation to Jan. 1, 1880, is $872.64. Speak- 
ing tubes and electric bells have been introduced 
in City Hall, by order of the City Council, at a cost 
of $1180.51. 

A comparative statement of the number of 
county buildings, public buildings and school-, 
houses, together with the number of feet of land 
covered by the same, between the years 1864 and 
1880, is given, which shows the number of build- 
ing to have increased in sixteen years 194 build- 
ings and of land equivalent to eighty-four acres. 
The estimated valuation of the several county, 
public buildings and schoolhouses, including fur- 
niture, land, etc., is as follows: County buildings, 
$2,000,000; public buildings, $6,534,364; school- 
houses, $7,996,500; total, $16,530,864. 

The rent of, and in some instances the taxes on, 
the accommodation for the Directors of Public 
Institutions, Registrars of Voters, Inspector of 
Milk and Truant Officers, the City Solicitor, the 
Police Commissioners and the Board of Health, 
on Peuiberton square, amount to $7900, and the 
Park Commissioners in the New England Life In- 
surance Building pay a rent of $850. Rooms are 
also leased in the South Boston Savings Bank 
Building for a branch of the Public Library, 
at an annual rent of $3000; and, for the 
accommodation of the people in the High- 
land District, rooms are leased in the building 
known as Fellowes Athenaeum, for a branch li- 
brary, at an annual rent of $1600. The city also 
assumes the rent of the lower story of building 
674 Tremont street, owned by the Mercantile Li- 
brary Association, the city having the free use of 
their boons for a public library upon the payment 
of the annual rent of $1000. Rooms are hired in 
building No. 39 Court street for the justices of the 
Superior Court, for the trial of jury-waived cases, 
for the sum of $2400 yearly. 

The public pounds are located at Albany street; 
Eagle square, East Boston; First street, South 
Boston; Highland street, Almshouse lot; Alms- 
house lot, Wara 24; Town House lot, Ward 25, and 
South street, Ward 23. 

Boylston Hall, over Boylston Market, is hired 
for a drill room for the scholars belonging to the 
Latin and English High schools. 

Bacon's Hall, Highlands, is hired for a drill 
room for the scholars belonging to the Roxburv 
High School. 

Sent up. 

PUBLIC PARKS. 

The fifth annual report of the Park Commission- 
ers was received. Sent up. 

The receipts and expenditures of the depart- 
ment for the year 1879 have been— Balance unex- 
pended Dec. 31, 1878, on Back-Bay Park land ac- 
count, $35,607.80; amount paid for land purchased 
in 1879 and balance unexpended Dec. 31, 1879, 
$35,607.80. 

The Back Bay Park construction account is — 



Balance unexpended, Dec. 31, 1878, $6846.36; 
amount transferred from department approp na- 
tion by order approved March 15, 1879, $1700; ap- 
propriation for the financial year 1879-80, $120,000; 
total, $128,546.36. The expenditures from this 
appropriation on this ac ount to Dec. 31, 1879, 
have been $79,785.44. The Back Bay Park better- 
ment account has for expenditures $742.40, and an 
unexpended account of $48,018.52, which squares 
the above figuring. 

The receipts and disbursements of the depart- 
ment from the organization ot the board, Oct. 8, 
1875, to Dec. 31, 1879, are as follows: The total re- 
ceipts, less income and balances merging, which 
return to the city as revenue, were $662,402.01. 
The total expenditures to Dec. 31, 1879, were — 
Back Bay Park land account, $439,690.90; Back 
Bay Park construction account, $133,873.41; on ac- 
count general plan of parks, §8249.46; park nur- 
sery, Austin farm, $1585.05; Back Bay Park better- 
ment account, $926.80; balance unexpended Dec. 
31, 1879, $78,076 39; total, $662,402.01. 

The appropriations of 1879 for the work on the 
Back Bay Park were — For filling on boundary 
road, south of the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
$70,000; for continuing work on road bv teams, 
$50,000; total, $120,000. On June 2, 1879, proposals 
were advertised for, for filling on the western 
boundary road, south of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, and on June 16 the bid of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad Company was accepted, ana a 
contract made for doing the work and supplying 
the material. 

The work done, under the inspection of City 
Engineer Davis, is as follows: About 20,700 
squares of gravel filling had been deposited to 
Dec. 31, on the marginal road between the rail- 
road and Longwood entrance, and 166,000 square 
feet of road has been constructed to a general 
width of fifty feet, and an average grade of 18.3. 
The filling by carts has amounted to about 38,500 
loads, or 5457 squares. 

The commissioners recommend that the neces- 
sary authority be granted them to secure, either 
by purchase or taking, the estates comprising so 
much of the Charles River embankment, proposed 
in their report of 1876, as lies upon Charles street, 
between Leverett and Cambridge streets, and that 
his Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 
Legislature for leave for the city to occupy the ad- 
jacent space in Charles River within the line 
described, to be used for a public park in connec- 
tion with the said estates. This improvement would 
be for the especial health and enjoyment of the 
dense population living in the northern 
and northeastern parts of the city. The area of 
the estates which it is proposed to take is 268,310 
square feet, o» about six acres, of which amount 
the city now owns 40,000 square feet, occupied by 
the Paving Department. The valuation of 1879 of 
the buildings is $34,100, and of the lands $311,600; 
total, $351,700, of which amount that belonging to 
the city is for buildings, $10,000, and for land, 
$70,000; total, $80,000, leaving amount to be pur- 
chased as by Assessors' valuation, $271,700. 

The residents of South Boston, as well as citi 
zens of other sections, have in various ways dur- 
ing 1879 called attention to the subject of locating 
a marine park at City Point. Such a park in a 
maritime city would seem to be a matter of 
course, provided a location could be had. Fortu- 
nately, the requisite physical conditions, with 
most favorable surroundings, are found to exist 
at City Point. The area within the lines that land 
can be had is 1,763,006 square feet, of which 1,553,- 
844 square feet are fiats, valued by the Assessors 
at a half cent per foot, and 209.162 square feet of 
land, valued at prices varying from six cents to 
thirty-five cents per foot. The total value of the 
area and buildings is $50,600. 

Under the act entitled, "An pet for the laying 
out of public narks in or near the city of Boston, 
1875, chapter 185, sections 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, it became 
the duty of the Board to assess "any benefit and 
advantage," which any real estate may receive 
"from the locating and laying out of a park under 
the provisions of this act, beyond the general ad- 
vantages to all real estate in the city of Boston," 
and, "provided that the entire amount so as- 
sessed upon any estate shall not exceed one-half 
of the amount which said board shall adjudge to 
be the whole benefit received by it." 

The number of estates or lots upon which a bet- 
terment has been assessed is 616, with a total area 
of 15,388,567 square feet, and amounting to the 
sum of $431,972, an average of two cents and eight 
mills per square foot. The assessed valuation of 
the lands comprising these estates was, in 1877, 



57 



COMMON COUNCIL 



$11,143,751; ami in 1879,812,8.55,004; showing an 
increase of $1,711,913, or 15 3-10 per cent. 

The gross amount of the betterment is 25 2-10 
per cent, of the increase in valuation. During 
the same period the reduction in the valuation or 
the refraining land throughout the city was $36,- 
141,013, or 12 8-10 per cent. Hills for assessments 
of betterments have been sent to the city collect- 
or tor collection, the proceeds ot which will, as 
provided in the act, be paid into a sinking fund 
for the payment of the park bonds, issued for the 
purchase of the lands taken. 

Referred to the Joint Special Committee on 
Public Parks on motion of Mr. Pratt of Ward 21. 
BADGES. 

Under unfinished business, the Council consid- 
ered the order for the appointment of a commit- 
tee to procure badges for members of the Coun- 
cil who desire them, at a cost of five dollars for 
each badge. 

Mr Healy of Ward 10 offered an amendment, 
"Provided that members of the Council who de- 
sire shall have the privilege of paying for the 
badges which are furnished them." Lost. 

The order was declared passed. Mr. Healy of 
Ward 10 doubted the vote, and on motion of Mr. 
Wymau of Ward 21, the yeas and nays were or- 
dered. The order was passed — yeas 49, nays 14. 

Yeas— Messrs. Anthony, Bailey, Barry, Bigelow, 
Blakemore, Bowker, Brown, Christal, Coe, Cronin, 
C. P. Doherty, J. Doherty, Donahoe, Dudley, 
Farwel!, Fisher, Fitzpatrlck, Folan, Greenough, 
Hancock, Hart, Hilton, Hollis, Hoslev, Howard, 
Kendricken, Kidney, Lauten, Lovell, Maguire, 
Morrison, Nason, O'Dowd, l'erkins, Tray, Rogers, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Sibley, Daniel J. 
Sweeney, Sr., Daniel J. Sweeney, Jr., Swift, 
Taylor.Tucker, Viles, Welch, Wharton, Wheeler, 
Whitmore— 49. 

Nays— Austin, Brimbecom, Child, H. Clapp, 
Freeman, Healy, Lane, McLaughlin, Parkman, 
Plimpton, l'ratt, Ward, Williams, Wyinan— 14. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Brintnall, Brown, 
Chrlstal, Clapp, Denney. Devine, Devlin, Mc- 
Narnara, Murphy, Sweetser — 10. 

Mr. Lauten moved a reconsideration, hoping it 
would not prevail. 

The President appointed Messrs. Maguire of 
Ward 19, Wyinan of Ward 21, and Brown of Ward 
23 a committee to procure badges. 

SKATING OB PUBLIC GARDEN TOM). 

1 nder unfinished business, the Council consid- 
ered the order for the Committee or. Common to 
keep the Public Garden Pond in condition for 
skating during the present season. 

Mr. Parkman of Ward 9—1 know the Committee 
on Common and Squares is one of the most pow- 
erful committees of the City Council, but I don't 
think it is quite powerful enough to carry out the 
order as it now stands, because they are to keep 
the pond in proper condition for skating, what- 
ever the weather may be, or whatever accidents 
may happen. I should like to amend the order 
by inserting the words "as far as possible." I 
should like to call attention to the fact that the 
appropriation for Common and Public Grounds is 
nearly expended, and the Council need not be sur- 
prised if we come in for an additional appropria- 
tion before the end of the year. 

Mr. Parkman's amendment was adopted and 
the order as amended was passed. Sent up. 
WASHINGTON'S lit It I'll DA V 

Among the assignments for the eveningwas the 
order to ring the bells and display flags on Feb. 
23, in commemoration of the birthday of George 
Washington. 

Mr. Parkman moved to amend by omitting the 
word- "bells to be rang." Declared lost. 

Mr. Parkman doubted the vote, and the Council 
was divided— 17 for, 35 against— and the amend- 
ment was rejected. 

.Mi . Whitmore— If any one can inform me I de- 
sire to know who has authority to ring the bells. 
My impression is that last year the bells were not 
rung mi the Fourth of July because it was in 
charge of the police authorities and was an addi- 
tional cost which they did BOt deem necessary. I 
question whether the order is in such a form that 
the Mayor can cause it to be done. My impres- 
sion is that last year only the Hollis-street bell 
rung, and that at the expense of the society. I 
move that the order be laid upon the table in or- 
der to find out in what way it should be provided 
for. 

Mr. Chrlstal of Ward 8—1 hope the motion to 
lay upon the table will not prevail. I am glad 
there is one patriotic: church in Boston. I believe 
the Fire Commissioners have the ringing of the 



bells. The expense of ringing them on a day like 
that is a very small matter. I hope the gentle- 
man will consider this only one of the means of 
commemorating the birthday of the forefathers 
of our country. 

The motion to lay on the table was lost. 

The order was passed— yeas 52, nays 1. 

Yeas— Messrs. Anthony, Bailey, Hurry, Blake- 
more, Bowker, Brimbecom, Brown, child, Chris- 
tal, H. B. Clapp, One, Cronin, Doherty, Donahoe, 
Dudley, Farwel I, Fisher, Fitzpatrick, Folan, Free- 
man, Greenough, Hancock, Hart. Healy, Hilton, 
Hoslev, Howard, Kidney, Lane, Lauten, Lovell, 
Maguire, McLaughlin, Nason, O'limvil, l'ark- 
man, Plimpton, Pratt, Pray. Rogers, H. N. 
Sawyer, Sibley, I). J. Sweeney,' Jr., Swift, Taylor, 
Tucker, Viles, Ward, Welch, Wharton, Wheeler, 
Williams, Wyinan— 53. 

Nays— Mr. Whitmore — 1. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Austin, Bigelow, 
Brintnall, H. Clapp, Denney, Devine, Devlin, c. 
F. Doherty, Hollis, Kendricken, McNamara, Mor- 
rison, Murphy, Perkins, N. Sawyer, D J. Swee- 
ney, Sr., Sweetser— 17. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10— Petitions of Paul- 
ine Nuremberg to be paid for injuries through 
defective sidewalk on westerly side of Harrison 
avenue, Jan. 3, 1880; John Donovan to be paid 
for personal injuries received while at work at 
Deer Islaud. Severally referred to the Joint 
Committee on Claims. Sent up. 

By Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10— Boston & Albany 
Railroad Company, for leave to erect a wooden 
building on Devon street, Ward 25. Referred to 
the Joint Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings. Sent up. 

By Mr. Wheeler of Ward 10— Petition of Jno. 
T. Wogan & Co., for the exclusive use of the bill 
board on city land at corner ot Eliot street and 
Columbus avenue. Referred to Joint Committee 
on Streets. Sent up. 

CLAIMS. 

Mr. Swift of Ward 9 submitted a report from 
the Committee on Claims, of leave to withdraw 
on the petition of Deborah B. Pearce, to be com- 
pensated for personal injuries received on Vernon 
street. Accepted. Sent up. 

PENSIONING FIREMEN. 

Mr. Bowker of Ward 10 submitted a report from 
the Committee on Fire Department on the com- 
munications of the Fire Commissioners in rela- 
tion to pensioning aged and disabled firemen, re- 
ferred from last year, recommending the 
passage of an order— That his Honor the Mayor be 
requested to petition the General Court, at its 
present session, for the passage of an act ena- 
bling the city of Boston to pension members of 
the Fire Department, who, by reason of long ser- 
vice or injuries sustained in the discharge oftheir 
duty, may become incapacitated from active 
duty. Order passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Christal moved a reconsideration, hoping it 
would not prevail. Lost. 

PRESERVATION OF CEMETERIES. 

Mr. Healy of Ward 10 submitted the following: 
The Committee on Legislative Matters, to whom 
were referred, as a part of the unfinished busi- 
ness of 1879, the report and orders relative to the 
preservation of cemeteries, and also the order of 
the present City Council upon the same subject, 
beg leave to report that in the opinion of the 
committee no action is necessary on the part 
of the City Council, inasmuch as a bill has been 
introduced into the Legislature, which, if adopted, 
will accomplish the purpose of the orders above 
mentioned. 
Accepted. Sent up. 

FIRE M \ USUAL. 

Mr. Parkman of Ward I) offered an order— That 
the Committee on Fire Department consider and 
report on the expediency of the creation of the 
Office Of Fire Marshal, and also what, if any, ad- 
ditional legislation is necessary. 

The order was read a second time and put upon 
its passage. 

Mr. Chrlstal moved the reference of the order 
to the Fire Commissioners. 

Mr. Parkman said it was a proper order to refer 
to the Committee on Fire Department. No doubt 
they will take the advice of the Fire Commission- 
ers." 
pMr. Christal — I accept. 

The order was passed. Sent up. 

extension OF D STREET, 

Mr. Donahoe of Ward 15 offered an order— That 
his Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 
General Court at its Dresent session for the pas- 



JANUARY 2 9, 1880 



58 



sage of an act to enable the city of Boston to 
extend D street across the Old Colony Railroad at 
grade. 

The order was read a second time and put upon 
its passage. 

Mr. Coe — It seems to me that order should be 
referred to the Joint Committee on Streets. 

Mr. Donahoe — I would like to state in explana- 
tion of that, I believe the subject was brought up 
last year, and I suppose most gentlemen here are 
familiar with it; but I would like to state the 
facts in regard to it. The Old Colony Railroad, in 
passing through South Boston, separates one por- 
tion from the other, except the two parts of Dor- 
chester street and Dorchester avenue. They are 
a mile distant from each other. They propose to 
have D street, half-way between these two points, 
cross the Old Colony Railroad at grade. This will 
bring into use a great deal of land now unoccu- 
pied, and enable people to cross from one point to 
the other without going a long distance. This 
matter was referred to the Railroad Commission- 
ers, on a petition of the city of Boston to cross the 
Old Colony Railroad at grade; but the decision of 
the commissioners was in favor of the com- 
pany. But the South Boston people did not 
wish to let it rest, and petitioned a second 
time. The commissioners have not y«t made 
up their report, but enough has been heard 
to indicate that the report will be against the 
petitioners. The only alternative will be to 
petition the Legislature, and as next week will be 
the last when new business can be brought before 
them, it was thought best to present this order 
for a petition for an act to cross the railroad at 
grade. It is not believed that it would pass the 
City Government unless the street crossed the 
railroad at grade. 

Mr. Coe — It is very evident that this matter is 
one of a great deal of importance, and we should 
not commit ourselves to anything hastily. It be- 
ing of so much importance, I still think we should 
have a report from the Committee on Streets on 
the subject. Unless the Committee on Streets, 
who are familiar with the subject, explain it, I 
shall insist upon my motion to refer to that com- 
mittee. 

The order was referred to the Joint Committee 
on Streets. Sent up. 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 12 offered an order — 
That his Honor the Mayor be requested to peti- 
tion the Legislature at its present session for 
such enactments as will permit the city or Boston 
to delegate to such officers or boards as the City 
Council shall from time to time designate any 
powers of appointing or nominating Assistant 
Assessors or clerks, or of acting as such assist- 
ants or clerks. 

The order was declared refused a second reading. 

Mr. Whitinore moved a reconsideration, and 
was about to speak on the subject, when the 
President put the question to the house. 

Mr. Bailey asked if it was not debatable, and 
the President said he did not see the gentleman 
from "Ward 12 rise. 

Mr. Whitmore— I hope the vote will be recon- 
sidered, for I had no chance to explain it, al- 
though I had risen to do so before the question 
was put. If this matter of the Assistant Assessors 
had not been specially assigned I intended to 
offer this order when it was under discussion. As 
I understand it, the plan proposed by the minor- 
ity will be thrown out on a technicality. At least, 
it was stated before the Committee on Ordi- 
nances, last year, that the power of appointing 
Assistant Assessors could not be exercised by any 
one except as prescribed in the city charter. By 
the city charter we have power to elect As- 
sessors by the Aldermen alone, by the City 
Council, or direct that they be elected 
in the wards. Quoting from memory, I be- 
lieve those are the only provisions. Quoting 
from the minority reportj the question now 
arises whether it might not be desirable to have 
the nominations made by the superior board. 
This power must be obtained from the Legisla- 
ture, and any legislation, if obtained this year, 
must be provided for now. I hope the order will 
be reconsidered, so as to enable the Mayor to in- 
troduce this petition to the Legislature. As the 
discussion goes on we may regret we did not make 
the request of the Legislature for authority to 
make these appointments. I think it is wise to 
obtain all such powers from the Legislature. The 
chances of going to the Legislature are practical- 
ly limited to two or three meetings of the Council 
in the early part of the year. If we wish to make 



any changes in this direction, we must pass this 
order at the present time. We are not obliged 
to exercise this authority if the Legislature 
grants ft. 

Mr. Kidney of Ward 6—1 object to passing this 
order on account of the lateness of the hour it is 
brought in. Early in the evening many members 
asked to have the matter of the Assessors espe- 
cially assigned, which was done. The hour is late, 
and many who were here early in the evening 
have gone home. 

Mr. Bailey— I voted for the order simply on the 
ground that it is asking for authority which I 
think the City Council ought to have. Whether 
we should exercise it is an after consideration. 
The time will soon go by when such an order can 
be offered, and certainly if the report of the mi- 
nority of the committee on Assessor's Department 
is adopted, we should pass this order, and request 
the Legislature to give us power to adopt that 
plan. It suggested itself to my mind that the 
law would have to be changed in case the report 
of the minority is carried out. I think it is ad- 
visable to have the power in our own hands. 

Mr. Kidney— Could not this order be introduced 
by any member of the Legislature from Boston 
without giving it the additional weight of having 
the Mayor petition for it, the same as was stated 
in regard to the order concerning the City Hospi- 
tal ? 

Mr. Bailey— Certainly it could, only in that case 
we were petitioning for an act of incorporation, 
thereby binding us to that course. In this case 
we simply ask for authority to act in a certain 
way in regard to a department, which we now 
have not the power to do. If we had petitioned 
for an act of incorporation of the trustees of th e 
City Hospital, subject to our approval, that would 
have been another thing; but the order was to pe- 
tition for an act of incorporation. In this case 
we are asking for authority to do something which 
we don't know whether we want to do or not. 

Mr. Kidney — Another objection is that we some- 
times get more than we ask for, though I don't 
know whether there would be any danger of that 
in this case. 

Mr. Christal — This matter seems to have devel- 
oped a great deal of debate. It is of considerable 
importance, and one which, if acted upon hastily, 
might make a great deal of mischief. I move to' 
specially assign to the next meeting at nine 
o'clock. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 — I trust that motion will 
not prevail, but that it will be voted down, that 
we shall vote to reconsider and then pass the or- 
der. 

Mr. Sibley— I hope the motion will not prevail. 
This is only going to the Legislature and asking 
for authority. I am not so distrustful that the 
City Council of Boston will abuse their privileges 
to any extent. The City Council will discuss all 
these questions when they come up and decide 
upon them. What my opinion will be when it 
comes up I know not. 

The motion to assign was lost, the reconsidera- 
tion prevailed, and the order was read a second time 
and put upon its passage. 

Mr. Kidney— I merely repeat that I object to 
passing this order on account of the lateness of 
the hour. It was expressly understood early in 
the evening that this matter should be laid over, 
and a great many members have gone home. It 
is an important matter and should not be be acted 
upon hurriedly. 

Mr Christal— It seems to me that under the pas- 
sage of this order as it now stands, some party 
who is unworthy will receive the appointment. 
Under the existing laws the men who receive the 
appointment are familiar with the committee, 
and the committee know whether they are compe- 
tent to fill the position. If this order passes, 
some parties not familiar with the duty will get 
the position. Now, sir, it is not my desire to see 
men get office because they have some distin- 
guished friends in their behalf, but it is my desire 
to see men who are competent placed in that posi- 
tion. I do think it is an injustice to these men 
who have gone from this hall tonight, to pass this 
order. I would like to move the assignment to 
the next meeting at nine o clock. 

The President— The motion is out of order. 

The order was declared passed. 

Mr. Kidney doubted the vote; the Council was 
divided— 40 for and 12 against. 

Mr. Whitmore moved a reconsideration hoping 
it would not prevail. Lost. 

Adjourned on motion of Mr. Plimpton of Ward 
21. 



59 



BOA BO OF ALDERM EN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 2 1880. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock 1'. M., Alder- 
man O'Brien, Chairman, presiding. 

.U'ROItS DRAWN. 

Thirty-six traverse jurors (second draft) were 
drawn for the January term of the Superior Court, 
second session, and thirty-two traverse jurors 
were drawn for the same court, first session. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Licenses. John C. Stiles, 
for leave to run a portion ol his coaches on their 
return trips through Court and Howard streets. 

To the Committee on Lamps. John G. Spear et 
al., that a lamp be located at the corner of Oak 
street and May place; Edward K. Baker ei nl., for 
oU lamps, on Bodwell street, Ward 20. 

To flie Committee on Common and Squares. 
I "avid H. Sheehan, to he paid for services ren- 
dered the city in Department of Common, etc. 

I'n the Committee on Public Lands. Michael 
Donahoe, that a new bond be given for an old 
one given for an estate on Middlesex street. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. W. K. Bart- 
lett to be paid for work done on I'olk-strect 
schoolhonse. 

To the Joint Committee on Survey <nul Inspec- 
tion of Buildings. E. G. Pond, for leave to ereet 
a wooden building on F street, between First and 
Dove streets; Bloody Merrill, for leave to erect a 
wooden building on Columbia street, near Seaver 
street. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Boar J . Petitions foi leave to occupy stables by 
Charles Weschrob, old wooden, two horses, Ger- 
man street, Ward 2.V. Willis T. Emery, old wood- 
en, seven cows and two horses, Ward street, Ward 
20; Patrick Collins, new wooden, four cows and 
one horse, Oakland street, Ward 24. 

To the Committee on Paving, w. u. cavanagh, 
to move a wooden building from First street, near 
L street, to foot of N Street, near ninth street; E. 
!•'. King & Co. et al., that India street, from the 
Custom House to Atlantic avenue, be repaved; 
.James J. Grace, for leave to lay down a new 
street pavement or carriage rail in some street; 
New England Mutual Lite Insurance Company 
et ol., that Avery street be paved with granite 
blocks; Robert G. Seymour etal., that brick side- 
walks be laid on Ruggles street, from Shawmut 
avenue to Cabot street: Josephus Morton et at., 
that Bowdoin avenue and El don street be put in 
order: Stearns A. George, for leave to set tele- 
phone poles on Western avenue, Brighton; Board 
of Fire Commissioners, for leave to set telegraph 
posts on Warren street, Roxbury; Thomas W. 
Bicknell it al., that Harvard, School, Abbott and 
Wales streets be put in order; 1". Ganter et at., 
that Lamartine street, between Centre and Hous- 
ton street, be macadamized; Metropolitan Kail- 
road Company, for leave to lay down a double 
track on Meridian street bridge: S. P. Dexter 
et al., that Hancock street, Dorchester, may be put 
in order, sidewalks laid, etc.; Moses Kimball, 
that the circle in Park square, discontinued 
as a highway, be curbed and that a lamp post be 
placed thereon; Owen Nawn et a!., that Lamartine 
street, from Centre street to Boylston street, be 
graded; George A. Shaw et al., that Blue Hill av- 
enue be graded and put in order from Columbia 
to Walk Hill street; Henry Dudley et al., that 
Albans street be graded and put in order; James 
A. Kiedell et at., that Newbury street lie macad- 
amized and edgestones set from Dartmouth to 
Hereford streets; Central Massachusetts Tele- 
phone Company, for leave to set certain poles in 
the Brighton District; A. W. Hastings et al., that 
Poplar street, Ward 23, be gravelled and put in 
order; G. F. Burkhardt, for leave to project a 
platform upon sidewalk and Parker street, oppo- 
site Longwood avenue; Henry Clay et al., that 
Neponset avenue be put in order from Mill street 
to the bridge; John W. Hollis et al., that Brighton 
avenue be macadamized; Charles E. Turner et al., 
that Saratoga street be put in order near the rail- 
road crossing, and that a plank walk be laid: S. 1'. 
Dexter et at., for increase of light in street lamps 
of Dorchester; Elbridge Torrey et al., for increase 
of light in street lamps of Dorchester; C. F. Swan 
et al., for more light at Dorchester Lower Mills; 



W. O. Taylor et al., for increase of light for street 
lamps ot Dorchester; William Gray, Jr., et al., 
that a four-foot burner be substituted for the 
street lamps of Dorchester; F. Jones et al., that 
Union avenue be put in oraer; Emerson Wheeler 
etal., for crosswalks at corner of Cambridge and 
North Harvard streets, Ward 25; George B. Liver- 
more et al., for crosswalks on Winship street at 
Washington street, Ward 25; George H. Brooks 
etal., that Faneuil street, Ward 25, be put in 
order. 

Alderman Whitten presented the petition of 
Samuel Downer et al., residents in Dorchester, 
representing that Dorchester avenue is, and long 
has been, in a condition unfit for use, and urgent- 
ly requesting that it be put In state of repair 
more suitable tor so important an approach to 
the city. Referred to Committee on Paving. 

r\ I'.CITIVK APPOINTMENTS. 

Superintendent of Faneuil Hall— William F. 
Brooks. Confirmed. 

Superintendent of Faneuil Hall Market— George 
E. McKay. Confirmed. 

Superintendent of Lamps— George H. Allen. 
Confirmed. 

Weigher of Coal— Charles H. Moseley. Con- 
firmed. 

Inspector of Milk— Martin Griffin. Confirmed. 

HEARING ON STEAM ENGINE. 

A hearing was had on the petition of Chadwick 
Lead Works to erect and use a stationary steam 
engine at 173 High street. No objections. Refer- 
red to Committee on Steam Engines. 
the WEST no\i;ri;\ park. 

ruder unfinished business, the Board consid- 
ered the report and order to purchase 400 acres 
for a public park in West Roxbury, in accordance 
with plan in City Doc. 42, 187(5, and to issue bonds 
to the amount of $850,000 to meet the expenses. 
Laid on the table, on motion of Alderman Breck. 

PAPERS I'ltd.M THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Annual report of Superintendent or Public 
Buildings. (City Doc. 18.) Placed on tile. 

Annual report of Public Parks Department. 
(City Doc. 15.) Placed on file. 

Report "No further action necessary," on order 
for better presevation of cemeteries, as an act has 
been passed for that purpose. Accepted in con- 
currence. 

Order for Superintendent of Health to purchase 
supplies for his department under direction of the 
Committee on Health. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for Clerk of Committees to prepare a 
classitied index to the twelve volumes of Pro- 
ceedings of City Council, at a cost not exceeding 
S1000, to be charged to appropriation for Print- 
ing. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Common, etc., to keep 
the pond on the Public Garden in good order for 
skating. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for the observance of Washington's 
Birthday by display of flags anil ringing of bells, 
etc. Passed in concurrence; yeas, 12; Days, 0. 

Report (leave to withdraw) on petition of 
Deborah B. Pearce to be paid for personal in- 
juries received on highway. Accepted in con- 
currence. 

Order for Mayor to petition the General Court 
for an act to enable the city to extend D street 
across the Old Colony Railroad at grade. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Streets, in concurrence. 

Report and order to apply tor an act to enable 
tlie city of Boston to pension members of the Fire 
Department in certain proper cases. Passed in 
■ oncurrence. 

Order for Committee on Fire Department to re- 
port on the expediency of establishing the office 
of "Fire Marshal." Passed in concurrence. 

Order for Mayor to apply to the Legislature for 
an act to enable the city to delegate to such 
board- a- it may determine the powers of ap- 
pointing assistant assessors or clerks, or of per- 
sons acting as such assistant clerks. Indefinitely 
postponed on motion of Alderman Breck. 
DECORATION DAY. 

Aii order came up to allow each post of the 
Grand Army §200 for purpose of defraying the 
expenses of Decoration Day, or assisting the 
families of disabled soldiers and sailors. 

Alderman Flynn— I understand there is a great 
difference of opinion existing today amongst the 
members of the Grand Army Posts as to how this 
$200 should be expended. A great many of them 
think if the money was appropriated for other 
purposes than that of decorating graves, and if 



FEBHLAEY 



2, 



1880 



60 



each post was allowed to use the $200, they could 
do a great deal more good with it in taking care 
of the lame and disabled soldiers, than if they 
spend it in decorating graves on the 30th day of 
May. I have no objection to making the appro- 
priation, but the question arises whether it is not 
better that the money shall be expended in some 
way which will help the disabled soldiers, than to 
decorate graves. 

On motion of Alderman Tucker the order was 
laid on the table. 

SOUTH BOSTON PAUK, 

When the annual report of the Park Commis- 
sioners had been acted on in concuirence, Alder- 
man Breck said— I have received a communica- 
tion from the Park Commissioners containing 
some important information they had not re- 
ceived when the annual report "was printed. 
With your permission, I will read the communi- 
cation in relation to the lands at South Boston 
for a park — 

Park Department, 
No. 87 Milk Street, Post Office Square, ] 
Boston, Feb. 2, 1880. 

C. H. B. Breck, Esq., Chairman Committee on 
Public Parks : Dear Sir — In our annual report — 
Jan. 20, 1880 (City Dec. No. 15)— we say in regard 
to the matter of a marine park at City Point : 
"The Commissioners have thus far been unable 
to secure any terms for the sale to the city of the 
lands and flats referred to, the owners of the 
principal part of the area declining to fix a price." 

Since the report was in print we have received 
offers of several estates within the territory sug- 

§ested for the park, from the owners, as follows : 
amuel H. Russell, representing 987,692 feet of 
flats, valued by the Assessors at one-half cent per 
foot, or $4900, offered for five cents per foot, or 
$49,000; Benjamin Dean and Augustus Russ, 75,000 
feet of land and flats, valued by the Assessors at 
$1900, offered for $25,000; Walter Smith, 84,1000 
feet of land and flats, valued by the Assessors at, 
land, $7500, buildings, $7300, offered for $30,00; 
Henry W. Nelson, 212,500 feet of land and flats, 
valued by the Assessors at, land, $12,500, build- 
ings, $3700, offered for $50,000; the four estates 
aggregating $154,000, leaving two estates for 
which no offers have been received, namely, Pat- 
rick Holley, 29,487 feet of land, valued by the As- 
sessors at $6000; and Robert Scott, 374,274 feet of 
land and flats, valued by the Assessors at $6800. 
The total valuation being $50,600. 
Yours truly. 

C. H. Daltox, Chairman. 

Referred to Joint Committee on Parks. Sent 
down. 

WASTE OF WATER. 

An order came down to petition the Legislature 
tor an act to authorize the jity of Boston to regu- 
late the use of water by metres. 

Alderman Viles in the chair. 

Alderman O'Brien— I not only do not like the 
appearance of this order, but I don't like the 
haste with which it was put through the other 
branch of the City Government. The order was 
presented, the rules were suspended and the 
order was passed with but a very brief explana- 
tion; and after it was passed it was clinched by a 
motion to reconsider, which was rejected. This is 
a very important matter and ought to receive 
more consideration than it did in the Council. 1 
am surprised at the intelligent men up there in 
the Council allowing such an order as that to pass 
with their eyes closed, for, in fact, they did so. I 
do not know of any body of taxpayers in the 
city of Boston who have been more imposed upon 
than the water takers. They have had to pay the 
interest on an imaginary debt; surplus revenue 
that ought to have been placed to reduce the 
water debt has been diverted from it. Well, now, 
what does this waste of water amount to ? Some 
statistics accompanying the report give us 54,220 
water takers in the city of Boston, and of these 
30,028 are houses. What do these water meters 
cost ? The Water Registrar and the gentleman 
who introduced this matter in the Common Coun- 
cil fix the price of these meters at $25 each; but I 
find that $25 is the lowest price at which they are 
sold; that they cost $25, $50, $75, $100 and $175. 
By taking the lowest price, any Alderman can as- 
certain what it is going to cost to put in 54,226 
meters to fix a value on the water consumed by so 
many takers. I believe you will have as the sum, 
$1,345,650. But it would be lair to assume the 
meters would cost a much larger sum than that 
if they were to be attached to every dwell- 



ing. I don't see how you can carry out 
this scheme equitably without attaching a meter 
to every dwelling. You can force it on to one 
house and not force it on to another. If a water 
meter is forced upon my premises, it is my duty 
to have it forced upon my neighbor. I think the 
passage of this order is merely the entering wedge 
to force the city of Boston to buy 54,000 water 
meters, at a cost of $25 each or upwards. Now, 
Mr. Chairman, the three basins we have bruit and 
almost completed to hold the water of Sudbury 
River have nearly cost $750,000, including land 
damages and all expenses. Those basins will hold 
one-quarter of all the water consumed in Boston 
in a year. Well, now, it is a very common remark 
that in some cases the remedy is worse than the 
disease. Here is an example in point. The reme- 
dy proposed to prevent this waste of water is 
worse than the disease. If $750,000 will build 
three water basins on Sudbury River, the nearly 
$1,500,000 these meters would cost would build six 
of such basins, that would hold all the wa- 
ter the city of Boston could consume in a 
year. If this waste of water is to !je pre- 
vented, it appears to me that the expense of do- 
ing it by meters will be far more than if we al- 
lowed the citizens of Boston to use just what 
water they pleased without putting any restric- 
tion upon them. I do not believe in this great 
waste of water. The poor water takers are every 
year threatened more or less by the Water Board 
in regard to this great waste of water, but I be- 
lieve that sins are put on their shoulders which 
don't belong to them. And why so? We have in 
the city of Boston twenty-three urinals, and ac- 
cording to the Water Registrar they would con- 
sume 8640 gallons a day, making 09,000,000 a year. 
The amount charged the Health Department for 
the water consumed by these urinals is a mere 
nominal sum. It is a very small sum. But the 
water consumed by these urinals goes into the 
waste that is attributed to the water takers. It 
is put upon their shoulders. 1 look upon that not 
as a waste, but as a necessity. These urinals 
don't consume any more water than should 
be used to keep them clean and pure. 
But still, in the average presented here, 
the water consumed by these urinals is 
put down as waste by the private consumers. We 
also have fifty-two drinking fountains in the city 
of Boston. They run more or less during the 
year, and consume millions of gallons of water; 
and the city does not get any corresponding re- 
turn from the department. That use of water is 
put upon the water takers, and the remedy is that 
meters shall be attached to each dwelling at an 
expense of $25 and upwards, to prevent this 
waste. I might say that in the summer our foun- 
tains are playing all over the city, and consume 
large quantities of water. I might say the Fire 
Department consumes much water. It is n't 
waste. But if in the measurement ol value, the 
water that is used and consumed or wasted in the 
city of Boston, cannot be accounted for at an av- 
erage expense of two cents per 100 gallons, the 
balance is always called waste, and the poor wa- 
ter takers have to suffer. I believe there is waste 
to a certain extent, and should like to see it 
stopped. But to try to stop this waste by putting 
a water meter on every dwelling at such a large 
expense, does not appear to be right. I will refer 
the Board to the ordinance which I think al- 
ready covers this matter — 

Sect. 27. "The owner and occupant of any prem- 
ises in which water furnished by the city is used, 
who fails to keep the service pipes and fixtures in 
good order, and neglects to repair the same within 
three days after they have become defective from 
any cause, shall be liable to a fine of two dollars; 
and, in case of neglect to shut off the water after 
using it so that it'runs to waste, said owner or 
occupant shall also be liable to a fine of two 
dollars; and, if the fine aforesaid is not paid 
within two days from the time when said notice 
is given, the water shall be cut off from the said 
premises, and shall not be let on again until the 
waste be stopped and the tine paid, together with 
an additional sum of two dollars for cutting off 
and letting on the water; and, in case of a second 
offence during the same year, a fine of four dollars 
shall be imposed, and it not paid as before men- 
tioned, the water shall be. cut off and shall not be 
let cu again until the cause of complaint is re- 
moved, and the fine paid, together with two 
dollars for cutting off and letting on the water: 
and, in case of a third or subsequent offence, the 
water shall be cut off, and shall not be let on 
again except by a vote of the Boston Water 



(11 



HOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Hoard, and the payment of such fine, not exceed- 
ing ten dollars, as the said board may impose." 

Now I think we have ordinances enough on this 
subject. If our Water Board are active and d« 
their duty, I don't see why they cannot prevent 
such a great waste. Hut there is another fact in 
connection with this matter, which is still more 
important for you to consider. If you read the 
papers you will find this: 

"New Ekgland Water Meter.' The stock of 
this company is attracting great attention, and 
has risen this week from 18 to 35, which is now 
bid." 

I Know there is no Alderman at this Hoard who 
has any of that stock in his pocket, and 1 hope 
the departments ol this City Government who are 
urging this matter own no stock in -this company. 
II they do, they ought to be cleaned out. 

"Only a few months ago it was put on this mar- 
ket at" $2 per share. It is said that the city of 
New York has contracted to use the meter on the 
Croton water all through the city." 

Don't you see it is said the citj ol New "York 
has agreed to use the meter on the Croton water 
all through the city? The city ol New York has 
done no such thing. 1 watch the New York pa- 
pers very closely, and have seen no action on 
their part to use the meter. Water meters have 
advanced within the past week, just as this mat- 
ter was considered in our City Council, from $18 
to $35, and I believe that will explain the haste 
with which it has been put through the City Gov- 
ernment, and I don't intend to let it go through 
without my voice being raised for more consider- 
ation. It is too important a matter to be allowed 
to pass, and I would move that it be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Alderman Thoindike— As 1 understand it, the 
Water Commissioners merely wish to place a 
small number of meters in large manufactories 
and tenement houses in this city, where it is an 
acknowledged fact that great waste of water is 
going on. About forty per cent, of the water that 
flows into this city is" wasted, and to such an ex- 
tent that it has reduced the level ol the water in 
the large buildings and stopped business, especial- 
ly in this vicinity. I hold in my hand a petition 
from the Water Board for an appropriation of 
$280,000 for laying a new main, and that is only a 
commencement ol requests from the Water Hoard 
for the same purpose. We shall have to continue 
putting down mains until this waste is stopped, 
it is n't intended that the meters shall interfere 
with the poor men at all. It is for the large 
buildings where the water is allowed to run day 
and night, and which the owners do not pay for. 
They wish to place meters in these large buildings 
and" make the owners responsi Die lor the water 
used. A thousand or fifteen hundred meters i- 
all they ask for. 1 hope the order will pass. 

Alderman Flynn— Have not all the hotels and 
large manufacturing establishments got these 
meters attached? 

Alderman Thoindike— I believe they have not. 
This has reference to laige manufacturing estab- 
lishments and tenement houses. 

Alderman Flynn— I know that almost all the 
hotels and manufacturing establishments have 
them: the Parker House and Tremont House have 
them. 

Alderman Thorudike— That is so; but that ap- 
plied to houses where the owner is responsible for 
the water. This ordei applies to places where no 
one is responsible. There are many places that 
have no meter, and they let the water run this 
cold weather to prevent freezing. 

Alderman fucker— I think the chairman of the 
Water Hoard caiue before the Committee on Wa- 
ter in good faith, and made a fair statement. I 
think the representations made by Mr. Davis 
were straightforward. The fountains, urinals 
and drinking places were all considered, and due 
allowance was made for all those things to which 
the gentleman on my left referred. The object is 
-imply to save a portion of this waste water. As 
the Alderman on my right has stated, a large 
number of the tenement houses in the city have 
no meters. It is very well understood that the 
large hotels and manufacturing places have me- 
ters. It isn't designed to interfere in am waj 
with the poor class of people. It wont reach 
them at all. I don't think a member sitting at 
this Hoard will be reached by it. The object is to 
save as much water as possible. 1 thiuk the chair- 
man of the Water Hoard, or Mr. Davis, 
said it would be necessary to go only 
to the large tenement houses. I think 
the whole matter is got up in good faith, 



and that the gentleman on n y left is on a wild- 
goose chase, when he speaks oi speculation in 
meters. The dealers in meters may have taken 
advantage of it. I don't think this is going to 
press the poor man at all. 

Alderman Caton— If this is left to the discretion 
of the Water Hoard to put meters in every dwell- 
ing house, I should object to it. Hut if," as the 
gentleman on my right says, it is to apply to the 
large manufacturing and "tenement houses, I have 
no objection to it. 

Alderman O'Brien— I will read the remarks of 
the chairman ot the Water Committee on the part 
of the Council in relation to this matter. I know 
when I called upon the department today, to get 
a little information, they appeared to be a little 
alarmed about any opposition toit, and they may 
have modified their views since it was introduced 
in the Council. But the chairman of the commit- 
ter -aid — 

"It is the desire of the Water Hoard and the 
Water Registrar that they shali be authorized to 
put on one meter in each building, and hold the 
owner for the water consumed. The owner then 
will look after his tenants and see that they do 
not waste the water." 

It is the intention of the Water Department. 
I believe they would put a harness on the neck of 
every water' taker, if we allowed them to have 
their own way, and work up any rules and regu- 
lations in that department. I believe it is the 
intention of the Water Hoard and all connected 
with that department to put a meter in every 
building. [ doiit see how they can avoid doing 
it, to be consistent. If this thing is worth any- 
thing, they must be consistent and put it in every 
house. No man will want a meter put into his 
bouse unless his neighbor has one. They must 
treat all alike. If you dole out water through 
meters to one man, you must do so to all, and I 
thought it would be proper for me to call the at- 
tention of the Hoard to the expense that a system 
of metres would incur. 

Alderman Flynn— I don't see the good ol going 
to the Legislature if they have power to put these 
meters in every house how. 1" understand they 
have power to do 80. I also understand that me- 
ters are used in the large hotels and manufactur- 
ing establishments, and I don't see why we should 
ask for any more authority if they are already 
vested w 1th power to put them in. 

Alderman Thoindike— The law at present ne- 
cessitates a meter in every department of a build- 
ing. In a large building' where there were forty 
diil'erent tenants the\ would have to put in forty 
meters. Hut this petition is to allow us to put 
one meter on the outside, and have the owner of 
the building responsible for the whole. 

Alderman O'Brien— 1 meant to have called at- 
tention to one fact in relation to the waste, that 
the committee might have proper consideration 
of the waste by urinals. According to the state- 
ment ol Mr. Davis, these urinals will consume 
about 69,000,000 gallons in a year. For ten of those 
urinals the Hoard of Health paid $293 this last 
year. If twenty-three urinals consume 09,000,000 
gallons a year, at the rate ol two cents per 100 
gallons, that will amount to something like 
$13,800, and ten urinals ought to consume nearly 
one-halt that quantity, lor which the Hoard of 
Health paid $293. All the balance, over and above 
that, is called waste, and is put on the shoulders 
of these private consumers, who are said to be 
the parties who waste the water. There is some- 
thing wrong about this whole business. They say 
there is waste where there is no waste. I don't 
believe in it. If there is waste, it is the city itself 
which is the waster in this business. I believe 
the water i- consumed in a proper and legitimate 
way by our fountains, urinals and tire department; 
and if We take in all that consumption I am satis- 
tied there is not the waste the Water Hoard rep- 
resents. 

Alderman O'Hrien withdrew the motion to in- 
definitely postpone, and on motion of Alderman 
Tucker the order was specially assigned to the 
next meeting. 

Alderman O'Hrien in the chair. 

BOARD OF Hi: VI. I II. 

A communication was received from the Hoard 
of Health requesting an additional appropriation 
■ I >4000 and a transfer of $1000, making *r>000, 
which will he necessary to meet the expenses of 
the department for the remainder of the finan- 
cial year. While the work of the department has 
constantly increased, its expenditures have de- 
creased nearly every year since the establishment 



F KBRUARY 



1880 



62 



of the board. )'.■ i'errecl to Joint Committee on 
Health. Sent cd wn. 

EXTENSION OF D STREET. 

A communication was received from the Mayor 
transmitting the following for such reference as 
the City Council may prefer: 

Boston, Jan. 31, 1880. 
Hon. F. O. Prince, Mayor: Dear Sir— I observe 
in the published proceedings of the Common 
Council an order (referred to the Committee on 
Streets) requesting his Honor the Mayor to peti- 
tion the Legislature for the passage of an act to 
enable the city of Boston to extend D street in 
South Boston across the Old Colony Railroad at 
grade. 

The laws now provide that no new highway 
shall be laid out across a railroad at grade with 
out the consent of tbe Railroad Commissioners. 

There have been two applications made to the 
Railroad Commissioners by tbe Street Commis- 
sioners in behalf of the city of Boston to establish 
this grade crossing. Their report of the first ap- 
plication is already before the City Government. 
In substance it states, that while the necessity of 
the crossing is left to the adjudication of the 
Street Commissioners an examination of the 
premises satisfies the board that a grade crossing- 
can be avoided, and tbat the expense of estab- 
lishing and guarding a grade crossing would not 
be greater than tbe expense of changing the rela- 
tive grades of the railroad and proposed street so 
as to provide for carrying the railroad over the 
street. 

No adjudication has yet been made on the sec- 
ond application, but the explanation given for 
tbe order introduced states "that enough has been 
heard to indicate that the report will be against 
the petitioners." 

It is also stated in explanation that "It is not 
believed that it would pass the City Government 
unless the street is crossed at grade." 1 suppose 
this to mean that while tbe City Government 
might appropriate money to make the street, it 
would not do so unless D street could be extended 
by a grade crossing with little expense to the city. 
There are now two crossings of the Old Colony 
Railroad in South Boston, one at Dorchester ave- 
nue at grade and a second at Dorchester street by 
an overhead bridge. The distance between these 
two crossings is about 2500 feet, and the proposed 
crossing at D street is about midway between 
these two points. 

If there has been shown a necessity for crossing 
the railroad at this point (which is peculiarly for 
the City Government to determine) the question to 
be solved is how this crossing shall be made. The 
Old Colony Railroad Company is now running 
over this proposed crossing nearly one hundred 
times per day, with the prospect of greatly in- 
creasing this number in the future. 

I need not enlarge upon the danger and incon- 
venience of grade crossings in a thickly-settled 
city. The city of Boston has already shown its 
appreciation of the necessity of avoiding them 
wherever possible. It has expended hundreds of 
thousands of dollars to avoid grade crossings on 
the west side of the city, and a very large sum to 
carry Swett street under the New York & New 
England Railroad, and Broadway over the Old 
Colony and Boston & Albany railroads. 

The crossing proposed at D street would be a 
very dangerous one. The proposed street is 
stated by the Street Commissioners as likely to 
become a very important avenue. It is now cov- 
ered by buildings to the very line of the track on 
the east side of the railroad, and, if the street is 
laid out, would be similarly covered on the west 
side in a short time. 

The trains on the railroad could not be seen 
until a person was actually on the roadbed of the 
railroad. A grade crossing would be attended 
with great danger to travellers on the highway 
and to travellers on the railroad. In my judg- 
ment it would be the most dangerous grade cross- 
ing within the city limits except that over Knee- 
land street by the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
which is now soon to be remedied. A grade cross- 
ing at this point is certain, sooner or later, to lead 
to accident and death. Once established it is es- 
tablished for all time. 

I am authorized to say that the railroad com- 
pany will cooperate with the City Government in 
any reasonable arrangement in making a crossing 
that will be safe and convenient both for the pas- 
sengers on the railroad and on the highway, and 
should be pleased to confer with any committee 



of the City Government having authority to act 
in the matter. 

I make this suggestion without fear of any 
probable action of the Legislature, but simply 
with the wish to avoid a contest with the city up- 
on a question where, as it seems to me, the mu- 
tual interests of both corporations would be pro- 
moted by harmonious action. 

Very respectfully your obedient servant, 
Charles F. Choate, 
President Old Colony Railroad Company. 

Referred to Joint Committee on Streets. Sent 
down. 

VITAL STATISTICS. 

A communication was received from the City 
Registrar, giving the following statistics for 1879: 
Births, 10,186; intentions of marrriage recorded, 
3656, for which $11828 were received. Marriages 
recorded, 3146; deaths, 7435. Sent down. 

VACANCY IN SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Notice was received from the School Commit- 
tee of a vacancy in that body caused by the death 
of Dr. Thomas M. Brewer, and proposing a con- 
vention to fill the vacancy on Feb. 10, at 7% P. M. 
Concurred. 

bridges. 

Annual reports of the Superintendents of 
Bridges were received, as follows: 

Charles River Bridge, 8728 vessels. 

Chelsea-street Bridge, 2327 vessels. 

Sent down. 

BOND APT-ROVED. 

The bond ofjSamuelS. Sherman, constable, be- 
ing presented, duly certified, was approved by the 
Board. 

SPECIAL ELECTION IN CHARLESTOWN. 

A precept was received from the Senate of 
Massachusetts giving notice of a vacancy in the 
Second Suffolk Senatorial District and fixing 
Feb. 14 for holding an election. Placed on file. 

Alderman Flynn offered an order — That war- 
rants be issued for the meetings of the legal 
voters of Wards 3, 4 and 5 at their several polling 
places within the voting precincts of said wards 
in which they respectively reside, on Saturday, 
the fourteenth day of February, inst., at 7% 
o'clock A. M., then and there to give in their bal- 
lots for a senator for the General Court now in 
session from the Second District of Suffolk Coun- 
ty, in the place of Eugene L. Norton, deceased. 
The polls to be kept open until four o'clock P. M. 
Passed. 

Alderman Flynn offered an order— That such of 
the laborers for the city of Boston as are resi- 
dents of Charlestown and legal voters there shall 
be allowed sufficient time in which to vote at the 
special election ordered in Wards 3, 4 and 5 on 
the 14th inst. Passed. Sent down. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Sewers (City Doc. 16) for 1879 was received and 
sent down. 
Following is a recapitulation of the work: 

City proper, 4,400 feet $9,691.78 

16 catch-basins, etc. 2,239.67 

South Boston. 2,427 feet 4,297.37 

" 41 catch-basins, etc. 2,755.63 

Charlestown. 702 feet 1.787.81 

" 14 catch-basins, etc. 2,011.23 

Roxbury, 5,132 feet 9.257.97 

24 catch-basins, etc. 2.500.52 

Dorchester, 1.413 feet 2,275.22 

8 catch-basins, etc. 843.05 

West Roxbury, 5,505 feet 10,544.56 

14 catch-basins, etc. 1.708.84 

Brighton, 2,471 feet 3,339.49 

" 5 catch-basins, etc. 492.00 

East Boston, 11 •' " 1,501.43 

f22,110 feet, or 4 miles, 

I costing $41, 104.20 

Tntau 1 133 catch -basins, 

xorais,*; etc., costing.. 14,051.77 

I ,. §55,245.07 

(.Miscellaneous expenses 50,240.29 

#105,486.20 
The whole length of sewers in the city is now 
about 188 miles. 

Assessments have been levied by the Board of 
Aldermen, and bills sent io the Collector, to the 
amount of §23,231.49. The Collector has received 
during the year, on account of the department, 
S35,331.57. 

During the year, 1427 permits have been given 
to construct or repair house connections, and 549 
loads— equal to about 1340 cubic yards of sewnae 
matter— have been removed from the sewers. 



68 



BOARD OF A L E> E R M K N. 



PUBLIC (i ROUNDS. 

The Second Annual Report of the Superintend- 
ent of Common and Public Grounds (City Doc. 20) 
was recorded and sent down. 

The expenditures for ten months have been 
$41,105.43, leaving a balance of $2894.57. 

During the past year many prominent and acc- 
essary improvements have been made, and much 
extra' work done, all within the appropriation. 
Many of the paths on the Common, and nearly all 
in the Public Garden, have been wholly dug 
out, raised, and underlaid with stone anil blue 
gravel. 

Portions of the Public Garden which had set- 
tled down, and had for years been noticeable for 
the pools of water, have been raised, graded and 
sodded over. Flower beds have been made, and 
others rearranged, more in harmony with good 
taste, and for the more effective grouping of the 
plants. Tremont-street Mall, between Park and 
West streets, on which an unsuccessful effort was 
made to grow crass, by which the harmony of the 
mall was injured, and the public needlessly de- 
prived of its use— this part has been entirely re- 
made and restored to the public as a shady prom- 
enade: Other improvements have been made 
beside the ordinary keeping of the public 
grounds. 

A speeial appropriation of 84000 has been made, 
$1800 of which has been for the painting and re- 
pairing of the fences on the Common and Public 
Garden, and the remaining $2200 has been ex- 
pended, as far as it would go, for the necessary 
equipment and protection of the trees in the fol- 
lowing sections ot the city: 

Dead. Pruned. Total. 

Charlestown 10 113 129 

East Boston 5 4TO 475 

Dorchester 12 240 252 

South End 8 163 471 

South Boston 5 tm 146 

Roxburv 9 I!'.' '201 

City i.roper J I 252 276 

Removed by petitions 16 48 04 

Total 05 1,018 2,013 

During the year 1878 o\ er six hundred trets were 
planted, all of which have done well and made 
good growth except about seventy trees planted 
on Orchard Park and Fort Hill square, the Cause 
of which is easily explained. The grounds have 
been filled in with street mud, similar to that on 
Monument Hill, and, as its effect, proved, even 
more Strongly impregnated with salts than that 
which proved so destructive to the trees on Mon- 
ument Hill. 

Four hundred loads of this material were taken 
from Fort Hill square alone and replaced by an 
equal number Of loads of good loam. 

The death of the trees proved so conclusive to 
my mind that early last fall I made an investiga- 
tion of the cause, and found that there were sev- 
eral loads of this poisonous stuff still remaining 
that must be removed before any practical re- 
sults can be obtained in the way of growing trees. 
The roots of the trees last planted were wholly 
destroyed, showing a peculiar blackness indicat- 
ing clearly the cause of their death. 

The grass thickly sown came up green and 
healthy, but was killed as soon as the roots sought 
nourishment from the ground. 

All those trees were planted as carefully as 
those on Chester park and elsewhere in the city, 
of which not two per cent, died, and no cause 
oan be given for their death other than the ex- 
traordinary and most singular death of the trees 
on Monument Hill. 

I desire to state here that the practice of letting 
out some of the public squares by contract has 
been wholly done away with by the committee, 
the wisdom and economy of which cannot be 
more clearly presented than by the following 
comparison : 

Lowell square, i B oollt ra<t— 

Blackstone square, I -* 870 g i,G50.00 

tranklin f 1877 1,050.00 

ImonPark, _J 83,300.00 

Worcester square, ) 

Lowell square. ^ % < 7 1P' tn,ent 8<.7 1 86 
Blackstone square, I g»- ; ■ ; ; ; ' ; *%$ , , 

Franklin V 81,740.66 

Union Park, " 

Worcester square. ) Bal m favor of de p art ., gi ,669.8 t 

And again : 

East Boston Squares— 

By contract, 187C #900.00 

'• " 1S77 000.00 

g 1.800.00 



By department. 1878.... 
1879... 



...8490.12 

373.19 



£809.31 

Balance in favor of department . . £930.09 

The attention of your honorable body is called 
to the items of stock and tools on hand, embra- 
cing equipments Eor the successful carrying on of 
the work of the department. 

In conclusion, permit me to say 'hat if any 
award of merit is due to the department, it be- 
longs entirely to the chairman and his committee, 
for they have exercised the most rigid scrutiny 
with regard to the management, expenditures 
and economy of the department. 

LAND DAMAGES, 

Alderman Flynn, for the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Board, offered orders to pay for 
land taken and damages occasioned by laying out 
streets as follows: Marshall S. Stone, $100, re- 
location of Columbia street, between Washington 
street and Blue Hill avenue; Sally C. Cummings, 
$397, widening of Commercial street and for estate 
in Holden court. Severally passed. 

new site roll PUBLIC l . i i ■■ i ; \ i : \ . 

Alderman Thorndike submitted the following: 

The Joint Standing Committee on Public Li- 
brary, to whom was referred so much of the May- 
or's inaugural address as refers to the Public Li- 
brary, having considered the subject, beg leave 
to submit the following report: The com- 
mittee concur in the opinion that it 
will soon become necessary o increase 
the library accommodations, and that it is 
desirable to secure a site for % building in antici- 
pation of the time when It will be needed. It is 
believed that, when a new building is erected, it 
should be placed upon the Back Bay territory, 
and in view of the fact that land in that locality 
is being rapidly disposed of tor building purposes, 
but few lots remaining unsold which are suitable 
for a library building, it is deemed desirable to 
secure a site while there is yet an opportunity. 
The committee, therefore, believe that the sug- 
gestion of ids Honor the Mayor should be acted 
upon and application made to the Legislature for 
the gift of a Tot of the Commonwealth's land on 
Boy lston street tor library purposes. To that end 
they would respectfully recommend the passage 
of the following order. ' 
For the Committee. 

George L. Thobndike, chairman. 

Ordered— That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court, at its present 
session, for the grant of a lot of land on the Back 
Bay for library purposes. 

Order passed. Sent down. 

si III \ PIPES FOB WATEIt WOUKS. 

Alderman Thorndike presented the following: 
Boston Wateb Boabd Office, I 

Feb. 2, 1880. I 
To the City Council— The Boston Water Board 
desire to renew their request made to the City 
Council Sept. 16, 1879, wherein they asked for an 
appropriation of $240,000, to enable them to con- 
tract for iron pipes for a new main from the 
chestnut 1 1 ill Reservoir to the city proper; but 
owing to the advance in the price of iron since 
that date, the sum of $280,000 should now be sub- 
stituted for the amount asked for at that time. 
Boston Water Board. 
By Leon \ ki> R. Co CTBB, Chairman. 
Referred to Joint Committee on Water. Sent 
down. 

NOMIN vnoNs and ELECTIONS 01 ' in in in i:jis. 

Director for Public Institutions. A certificate 
came up of the election of John Taylor in place of 
Paul H. Kendricken, elected by this Board. An 
election was ordered. Committee, Aldermen 
Flynn and Breck. Mr. Kendricken received 10 
votes and Mr. Taylor 2, and Mr. Kendricken wa» 
elected in non-concurrence. Sent down. 

Reports ot nominations were submitted, ac- 
cepted, and elections proceeded in the usual man- 
ner, resulting as follows: 

By Alderman Breck— For Superintendent of 
Streets, Charles Harris. Committee to Count 
Ballots, Aldermen Breck, flynn. Charles Harris 
had 12 votes and was elected. 

By Alderman Walbrid ge— For Superintendent 
of Public Lands, Robert W. Hall. Committee to 
Count Ballots, Aldermen Walbridge, Caton. Rob- 
ert W. Hall had ii rotes, Joseph Smith l. Mr. 
Hall was elected. 



FfcBR D AE Y 



1880 



64: 



By Alderman Caton — For City Messenger, Alvah 
H.Peters. Corun ittee to Count Ballots, Aldermen 
Caton, Walbridge. Alvah H. Peters had 12 votes 
and was elected. 

By Alderman Caton— For Superintendent of 
Public Buildings, James C. Tucker. Committee 
to Count Votes, Aldermen Caton, Walbridge. 
James C. Tucker had twelve votes and was 
elected. 

By Alderman Whitten— For City Engineer, Jo- 
seph P. Davis. Committee to Count Votes, Alder- 
men "Whitten, Thorndike. Joseph P. Davis had 
twelve votes and was elected. 

By Alderman Thorndike— For City Surveyor, 
Thomas W. Davis. Committee to Count Votes, 
Aldermen Thorndike, Whitten. Thomas W. Da- 
vis had 12 votes and was elected. 

By Alderman Tucker— For Clerk of Committees, 
William H. Lee. Committee to Count Votes, Al- 
dermen Tucker, Bell. William H. Lee had 12 
votes and was elected. 

By Alderman Viles— For Water Registrar, Will- 
am F. Davis. Committee to Count Votes, Alder- 
men Viles and Woolley. William F. Davis had 
twelve votes and was elected. 

By Alderman Viles— For City Registrar, Nich- 
olas A. Apollonio. Committee to Count Votes, 
Aldermen Viles and Woolley. Nicholas Apollonio 
had eleven votes, and there was one blank. Mr. 
Apollonio was elected. 

By Alderman Viles— For Superintendent of 
Sewers, William H. Bradley. Committee to Count 
Votes, Aldermen Viles and Woolley. William H. 
Bradley had eleven votes, Samuel Minot one, Ed- 
ward F. Brigham one. Mr. Bradley was elected. 

By Alderman Slade — For City Solicitor, John P. 
Healy. Committee to Count Votes, Aldermen 
Slade and Breck. John P. Healy had twelve votes 
and was elected. 

Severally sent down. 

By Alderman Slade— For Superintendent of 
Common and Public Grounds, William Doogue. 
Accepted. Sent down. 

Alderman Slade presented petitions handed to 
the committee since the meeting of the Board, 
signed by many citizens of Dorchester and mem- 
bers of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
strongly recommending Patrick Norton for the 
position. On motion of Alderman Slade the 
election was assigned to the next meeting. 

CARE OF THE PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Alderman Viles — I would like to inquire wheth- 
er the Commiitee on Common and Public Grounds 
have given Mr. Reardon a hearing on his offer 
sent to the committee a fortnight ago ? 

Alderman Flynn — The committee have not had 
a meeting since thet petition came in. They have 
not done any business. 

Alderman' Viles — I move that they give Mr. 
Reardon a hearing, and report to the Board next 
Monday. Mr. Reardon says in black and white 
what he can do. If he can save the city $15,000 I 
think he ought to have a hearing. 

Alderman Tucker — Did Mr. Reardon ask for a 
hearing? 

Alderman Viles— Anybody who sends in a peti- 
tion is entitled to a hearing. 

Alderman Tucker— If he does not ask for a hear- 
ing, I would let the committee take their own 
time. 

Alderman Viles — I asked for a hearing for Mr. 
Reardon. 

The Board voted to request the committee to 

§ive Mr. Reardon a hearing and report next Mon- 
ay. 

THE DRAWING OF JURORS. 

Alderman Woolley presented the following: 
To the Board of Aldermen of the city of Boston. 
The undersigned respectfully represent that there 
are gross frauds practised in connection with 
summoning of jurors in this city. It is quite 
common that jurors who are drawn by the Board 
of Aldermen, and sent to the different courts, are 
never summoned by said courts. It has also 
come to the knowledge of your petitioners that 
persons are even summoned by the courts who 
were never drawn at all. As the names of jurors 
drawn'are not published or made known to the 
public, it is possible that those connected with 
the courts, if so disposed, could, without it be- 
coming known to the public, reject every name 
sent them by the City Clerk, and summons any 
of the three thousand persons on the jury list. In 
view of the above facts, we respectfully petition 
that the names of jurors drawn be published in 
the official report. Petitions were presented to 



your predecessors to the same effect, but were 
rejected. 

George J. Moulton, 
552 Eighth street, South Boston. 
P. F. O'Neil, 237 Third street. 
Joseph McClurg. 
W. H. Brown. 
The Chairman— What is the pleasure of the 
Board? 

Alderman Woolley — I hardly know what com- 
mittee it will be proper to refer that to. It might 
be referred to the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters, and I would make that motion. 

Alderman Flynn— It appears to me there are 
very grave charges in that petition, and if proved 
to be true the officers engaged in the transaction 
ought to be discharged immediately, especially if 
they are constables. I move the petition be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Police on the part of 
the Board, with instructions to send for persons 
and papers and ascertain if the charges are true. 
The motion of Alderman Flynn prevailed. 

LANTERNS. 

Alderman Caton submitted a report from the 
Committee on Survey and Inspection of (Build- 
ings, that leave be granted George F.Kendall, 
agent, to project a plain lantern in front of the 
Franklin House, 414 Tremont street. Accepted. 

TELEPHONIC SERVICE. 

Alderman Tucker offered an order— That the 
Committee on County Accounts be authorized to 
establish telephonic communication between the 
office of the Medical Examiner for the Southern 
District and Police Station No. 5, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for the 
county of Suffolk. Passed. 

CLERK HIRE IN THE COURTS. 

Alderman Tucker presented duly-certified cer- 
tificates from the clerks of courts of the amount 
to be allowed for clerk hire during the month of 
January, as follows: 

Supreme Judicial $100.00 

Superior Civil 233 .32 

Superior Criminal 200.00 

Ordered paid. 

THE WINNISIMMET COMPANY. 

Alderman Breck offered the following: 

Ordered— That the order of the City Council, ap- 
proved Dec. 30, 1879, authorizing the mayor to re- 
lease to the Winnisimmet Company the interest 
of the city in certain lands on Brookline avenue, 
be and the same is hereby rescinded. 

Ordered— That his Honor the Mayor be author- 
ized to release to the Winnisimmet company, in a 
manner satisfactory to the City Solicitor, all the 
right, title and interest which the city have in 
certain lauds on Brookline avenue, in the city of 
Boston, now owned by said company under deed 
recorded with Suffolk Deeds, lib. 1381, folio 312, 
and being a portion of the estate which was in- 
tended to be released by two deeds recorded with 
Suffolk Deeds, lib. 1389, fols. 258 and 259. 

Passed. Sent down. 

OIL WORKS LICENSED. 

Alderman Woolley submitted a report from the 
Committee on Lamps on the Part of the Board in 
favor of granting a license to the Maverick Oil 
Company for leave to manufacture and stoie 
petroleum on Chelsea street, East Boston. 

CLAIMS. 

Alderman Breck submitted the following from 
the Joint Committee on Claims: 

Report of leave to withdraw, on petition of 
John Kearns, to be repaid the amount paid for a 
liquor license declared forfeited. Accepted. Sent 
d»wn. 

SUPPLIES FDR REPAIRING BRIDGES. 

Alderman Woolley, for the Committee on 
Bridges, offered an Order— That the Committee 
on Bridges be authorized to contract for such 
lumber as may be required for repairing the sev- 
eral bridges in this city during the year 1880, to 
be delivered at such times and in such quantities 
as said committee may direct. Passed. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Breck submitted reports granting 
licenses to five newsboys. Accepted. 

STABLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following from 
the Committee on Health on the v»art of the 
Board : 

Reports that leave be granted on the usual con- 
ditions to occupy stables as follows: 



65 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Devereux & Meserve, Fuller street, corner Mil- 
ton avenue, Ward 24: Joseph Gahn, Mechanic 
street; Richard Stoyle, 203 Heath street, Ward 22. 

Severally accepted. 

FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following: 
The committee appointed to examine the ac- 
counts of S. F. McCleary, treasurer of the Frank- 
lin Fund, have attendee* to that duty, and report 
that thev And said accounts have been correctly 
kept and the interest duly collected: and the se- 
curities, which were examined by the committee, 
were found in proper condition. It appears from 
the examination that the condition of the fund 
is, at this date, as follows: 

Amount of fund Feb. I, 1870 g230.489.S5 

Interest accrued and collected 9,606.62 

8249,005.87 

The above sum is invested as follows: 
Deposits in Massachusetts Hospital Life 

Office 8246,896.24 

Eight bonds for loans 1 ,430.00 

Provident Institution for Savings 280.87 

Suffolk Savings Bank 487.83 

Cash • -£3 

8249,095.87 
Respectfully submitted. 

? LI A V '-n .I-Vn S } Committee. 

J. A. irCKER, J 

Accepted. 

PROPOSED IUIIDGK TO CHAHLKSTOWX. 

Alderman Bell submitted the following: 
The Joint Special Committee appointed to con- 
sider the necessity of constructing a new bridge 
between Wards 5 and 7, beg leave to represent 



that it will require authority from the Legislature 
to enable the city to construct a new bridge, 
should it be deemed expedient to do so, and, as 
but short time remains in which new business 
can be introduced into the Legislature, your com- 
mittee would recommend that the necessary au- 
thority be obtained, in anticipation of its being 
required. They would, therefore, respectfully 
recommend the passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court, at its present 
session, for the passage ot an act authorizing the 
city of Boston to construct a new bridge between 
the city proper and the Charlestown district. 

Passed. Sent down. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Slade submitted the following from 
the Committee on Paving — 

Report that petition of Lucius Newell, et al., 
for a cross-walk on Hudson street, between Har- 
vard and Oak streets, be granted. Accepted. 

Order granting permission to Central Wharf 
& Wet Dock Corporation to occupy from time to 
time one-half the sidewalk in front of their prem- 
ises on easterly side of Atlantic avenue, to facili- 
tate the discharge of freight from their steam- 
ers, subject to the control of the Police Depart- 
ment. Passed. 

Orders to abate sidewalk assessments of certain 
widows unable to pay the same, as follows: Su- 
san Farren, 75 Liverpool street, $8.33; Mary Camp- 
bell, 11 Everett street, $15.17; Eliza A. Hartford, 
54 Gates street, South Boston, $9.24. Severally 
passed. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Caton. 



VL C 1 I I 



■ 



66 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council* 

FEBRUARY 5, 1880. 



Regular meeting at 7% o'clock, Harvey N. Shep- 
ard, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Reports of city officers. Placed on file. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Reference to the Committee on Streets, of a 
message from the Mayor transmitting a commu- 
nication from the Old Colony Railroad Company 
in relation to the extension of D street. Con- 
curred. 

Reference to the Committee on Health of a re- 
quest from the Board of Health for an appropria- 
tion of $5000 for its department. Concurred. 

Reference to the Committee on Public Parks of 
a communication from the Park Commissioners 
giving the prices for which certain lands may be 
obtained for park purposes at City Point. Con- 
curred. 

Report of leave to withdraw on the petition of 
John Kearns to be refunded the amount paid for 
a liquor license. Accepted in concurrence. 

Order to allow time to city laborers in Charles- 
town to vote on the 14th inst. Passed in concur- 
rence, and a motion to reconsider, by Mr. Whit- 
more of Ward 12, hoping it would not prevail, was 
lost. 

THE WASTE OF WATER. 

A request from the Water Board for an appro- 
priation of $240,000 for an additional main pipe 
from Cnestnut Hill Reservoir to the city came 
down to be referred to the Committee on Water. 

The question was on concurring in the refer- 
ence. 

Mr. Greenough of Ward 9—1 wish to take ad- 
vantage of the presence of this communication 
before the Council tonight, to make a short state- 
ment on some matters bearing upon this question. 
I shall do this in moving the customary reference 
to the committee. While there is, I believe, an- 
other and more potent reason for laying this main 
from Chestnut Hill reservoir to the city proper, 
yet the apparent and pressing cause of its. 
presentation is the waste of water, to which 
I alluded at the last meeting, and to pre- 
vent the increase of which I introduced an 
order which, as probably every member here is 
aware, has been subjected to severe criticism on 
the part of the Chairman of the Board of Alder- 
men, not only tor the matter which it contained, 
but for the manner in which it was put through 
this Council. If that order passes through the 
Board of Aldermen at the next meeting, as I trust 
it will, I hope it will be received into the Legisla- 
ture by permission. But, sir. we have no right to 
count" upon such permission being given; 
and therefore I felt it my duty at the 
last meeting to press the passage of that 
order through this branch. There was no inten- 
tion on my part to withhold any information from 
this Council, or to stifle debate, if any had been 
called for. I fancied 1 had been fortunate enough 
to make a sufficiently lucid statement to this 
body to prevent any debate upon the sub- 
ject. If that order militates against any 
class of men in this city, it is against the 
rich holder of real estate. It is in the interest ©1 
the poor. I confess I was afraid there might be 
some member of this Council who would ue in- 
fluenced by friendship or other reasons, to put in 
a notice of a motion to reconsider, after the ad- 
journment, and prevent that order from going 
to the Board of Aldermen in time to reach the 
Legislature. I therefore clinched the matter 
myself by a motion to reconsider. If it had 
not been the last week when new busi- 
ness could be introduced in the Legis- 
lature, I should not have done so. There 
is another matter I desire to speak upon. The 
Chairman of the Board of Aldermen saw tit to 
suggest that there were other reasons besides 
those publicly brought forward that might ex- 
plain the introduction of that o